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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Wow. Have you seen this? Again it may or may not be pertinent to your situation, but worth a read:

http://depersonalizationrecovery.com/articles/why-do-some-people-acquire-depersonalization-disorder-and-not-others/

So, if what the author says is true, how do we solve DP?

Those that had success in therapy, had this: they found a therapist that was a good fit and they learned to trust them. The trust is the key to recovery. If dissociation is a result of detachment as an infant, the way to re-attach is to build a safe and trusting relationship. This way, you can start taking "risks"- ie, dealing with everyday life situations and interactions and feeling OK to FEEL the feelings around those situations. In therapy you "shake up the status quo" . You learn to get out of your comfort zone in a safe environment.

in DP we are so afraid to live that we build a safe and predictable world around us, shutting out the chaos of life. But to really recover we have to learn to operate in the chaos of life. To try, stumble and fall and get back up. It's a process and can be unpleasant. That's why most people don't want to change- it can be uncomfortable. But it's not intolerable. If you have someone you can trust to guide you through those shake ups, you become more confident. It was impossible for you to jump into life before, if this trauma existed in your youth, because like the article mentioned when people of this trait experienced any kind of stress, their natural reaction was to dissociate. The process= "in infancy when I had pain or fear, no one made me feel safe. Therefore, I can't be ME. Because the "me" will not be safe." And we split off. But if you learn to open up to someone and build trust, there is a chance to say "ok, I can feel happy or sad or mad, and I will be ok because someone makes me feel safe and I don't have to stop being me" until you learn to do this process on your own.

But the key is finding someone that can really rock your world in therapy. I went to many good therapists but had no progress because there just wasn't that deep connection. When I found the right therapist, I remember walking into his office and just feeling a sense of compassion. Like there was depth there to that person. That made the difference.

Well..just my thoughts.
 

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This is definitely applicable to someone who has partially recovered and has a bit of a grip on their condition and wants to put a total end to their DP and never see it return...

Unfortunately I think its not exactly a realistic solution when the person is in the 24 / 7 throws of chronic DP and anxiety....You have to be able to think in some sort of logical head straight manner to process traumas and build trusting relationships with therapists etc....Unfortunately the sufferer of chronic DP has actually lost the ability to trust their own thoughts let alone the advice and opinions of others...

The dury is also out on HH....Alot of people think he is a bit of a fraudster trying to make a quick buck....That may have been his path to recovery but everybody is different and there is no one shoe fits all way out of DP......Lets face it if you have found a holy grail for DP recovery and knowing the hell it is to go through wouldnt you want to share the solution with others just like you for FREE?????

Its kinda like a scientist who discovers the cure for cancer and who could save millions of lives but decides your only gonna be saved if you pay me...

Otherwise known as a "Greedy C**t" .... Pardon my french... LOL
 

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Alot of people think he is a bit of a fraudster trying to make a quick buck....That may have been his path to recovery but everybody is different and there is no one shoe fits all way out of DP......Lets face it if you have found a holy grail for DP recovery and knowing the hell it is to go through wouldnt you want to share the solution with others just like you for FREE?????

Its kinda like a scientist who discovers the cure for cancer and who could save millions of lives but decides your only gonna be saved if you pay me...
It's a really good point. If I found the "holy grail cure" for DP i would just spread it as fast as possible.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Oh, I'm not familiar with the author...why do people think he is a fraud?
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Ah. Ok...saw the website. Not sure on him. He has a lot of good points but some things like the meditation- well, mindfulness stuff was never that helpful for me. But who knows.
 

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Yeah, I find it hard to believe too although some of the points hit the nail on the head but again, this guy wants money. And if this would have been an exercise program to turn fat into rock-hard muscles, I wouldn't have blamed him for trying to make a profit.

But this is someone's psyche!

What has me somewhat hooked is the fact that, while I was reading everything, the first person I thought of was my mother. There is DEFINITELY attachment issues. I never felt truly connected with her. She always left and even though I can't remember the details, something within me stirs when I see here. Don't get me wrong, I care for my mom, she did a lot of good for me but I feel that during my childhood years she was quite absent...

Again I'm doubtful but what if, man...what if this program could work for me?

Am I just a fish falling for the bait and getting hooked? Is he perhaps using target psychology, relying that some will appeal to the content and buy it? Or is there actual truth in his stuff and he's just a dick for making you pay for it?

UPDATE: Guy did have DP and lost a brother. Still dont like the whole paying part though.
 

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Wow. Have you seen this? Again it may or may not be pertinent to your situation, but worth a read:

http://depersonalizationrecovery.com/articles/why-do-some-people-acquire-depersonalization-disorder-and-not-others/

So, if what the author says is true, how do we solve DP?

Those that had success in therapy, had this: they found a therapist that was a good fit and they learned to trust them. The trust is the key to recovery. If dissociation is a result of detachment as an infant, the way to re-attach is to build a safe and trusting relationship. This way, you can start taking "risks"- ie, dealing with everyday life situations and interactions and feeling OK to FEEL the feelings around those situations. In therapy you "shake up the status quo" . You learn to get out of your comfort zone in a safe environment.

in DP we are so afraid to live that we build a safe and predictable world around us, shutting out the chaos of life. But to really recover we have to learn to operate in the chaos of life. To try, stumble and fall and get back up. It's a process and can be unpleasant. That's why most people don't want to change- it can be uncomfortable. But it's not intolerable. If you have someone you can trust to guide you through those shake ups, you become more confident. It was impossible for you to jump into life before, if this trauma existed in your youth, because like the article mentioned when people of this trait experienced any kind of stress, their natural reaction was to dissociate. The process= "in infancy when I had pain or fear, no one made me feel safe. Therefore, I can't be ME. Because the "me" will not be safe." And we split off. But if you learn to open up to someone and build trust, there is a chance to say "ok, I can feel happy or sad or mad, and I will be ok because someone makes me feel safe and I don't have to stop being me" until you learn to do this process on your own.

But the key is finding someone that can really rock your world in therapy. I went to many good therapists but had no progress because there just wasn't that deep connection. When I found the right therapist, I remember walking into his office and just feeling a sense of compassion. Like there was depth there to that person. That made the difference.

Well..just my thoughts.
Topics about therapy like this always reminds me of Good Will Hunting. Ever since I got this DP I'm looking for my Sean Maguire.

I want to do this, talk to a therapist, let out everything. But surprise, surprise, I DO have attachment issues and I don't easily trust people. I also have some narcissism and I can be sometimes very suspicious of people's agenda or motive.

I know that most of this is in my brain but I'm scared to be let down...again, I'm scared to be disappointed.

Heck, I'm not even scared if the therapy sessions don't eradicated my DP. Im more frightened in reaching a higher level of trust and accomplishment and then suddenly be let down by therapists and reveal themselves to be someone else with different/incomplete intentions.
 

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I think the article has some good Points which can be found in other sources / books / guides etc. as well.

The key to recovery from DP is to find someone to trust and who is able to bond with you. From my Point of view the bond is more important, in situations where I feel understood and can connect with my therapiest, the DP starts to lift.

Regarding the costs for the Programm of HH, I agree with eddy. Due to the seriousness of Dp, most sufferers are not able to work. The costs of USD 100 is a joke, he is just trying to make Money as most People are so desparate with this condition, they would try anything to loose the Feeling of DP. Also the guy talks forever about something you can explain in more simple and shorter way.

I have nothing against People who write books about their recovery stories but selling them as a Programm to recover from DP is .......
 
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