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Well, not everyone’s endeavors fail. Many people have found their way out of their problem and have shared their “cures” in the recovery section. Whether or not a person recovers from DPDR depends on several factors, including how long he has had it, how severe it is, what the nature (cause or reasons) are for his experience, and what resources he has available to him. Some people find total “cures,” some people find partial recovery, and others find some way to make this experience tolerable or even in some way beneficial for them.

It may be the case that, for some of us, DPDR will never go away, perhaps due to some undiscovered and incurable structural problem, or perhaps because we’ve just gotten “used” to experiencing ourselves this way that we are simply unable to perceive things the way they used to be.
 

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But there are some people who have reached their limits, myself included
I understand that; I’ve certainly gotten to the point myself. So the question then becomes, what do we do about it? Experiment with more meds and supplements? Distract ourselves forever? Take whatever minor positive experiences we have and run with them? Try to make lemonade from some admittedly decrepit, sour-ass lemons? However we choose to handle this is up to us. I wish I had the solution to our problem, but the problem is not just a psychological abstraction, the problem is life itself, and life cannot be solved, it can only be re-solved.
 

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I understand that; I’ve certainly gotten to the point myself. So the question then becomes, what do we do about it? Experiment with more meds and supplements? Distract ourselves forever? Take whatever minor positive experiences we have and run with them? Try to make lemonade from some admittedly decrepit, sour-ass lemons? However we choose to handle this is up to us. I wish I had the solution to our problem, but the problem is not just a psychological abstraction, the problem is life itself, and life cannot be solved, it can only be re-solved.
Let's hope there will be a difference in the future
 

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People don't really wan't to recover.Just look at the reddit group and the facebook group.You post the latest study about dpdr and almost no one discusses it or shows interest.Someone posts the same post about the same "do you also feel like..." for the 100th time and they all post the same crap, nagging, complaining etc.No wonder they lose hope.There are studies being done for this, it's just 99% sufferers don't care about and they don't even bother to just write "derealization/depersonalization" on google news.And do you see the negativity when someone posts a positive experience with medications ? It's like someone cursed them.How do they expect recovery ? Doing yoga poses ? Or listening to so called "gurus" who believe they know the truth now(when in fact they are mentally ill themselves but embraced their delusions) ?
 

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What does an endeavor failing mean? If you think direct effort of any kind to fight dp will work then of course you’ll fail. It’s illusions which fail us, drive us insane and get us nowhere. It’s not depersonalization, that’s just a name for a symptom of ourselves. That’s just common sense. Think circles around it, do this medication or that, this method, accept this or do that. As long as you have a motive driven by reward and punishment you won’t get anywhere. “If I do this will I get that”. You’ll find that whatever you find will not be good enough
 

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My depersonalization has been more or less the same for the past seven years but not all of my endeavors fail. I think mentally ill people's endeavors fail because the average person doesn't understand what we experience and the extra support we need. This is why skilled mental health treatment, social services, and disability support are so important.
 

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I think the question suggests something which is a common hallmark of mental illness, which is all-or-nothing thinking. In this context that is either being very sick or fully recovered - success or failure. It's very common, and very harmful. You look only at where you are and where you want to be, see the great gulf in between, and inevitably become overwhelmed and lose all hope.

Thankfully I've been gradually moving away from that mentality and no longer see things in black-or-white terms of being sick or well, but rather a scale where lots of small achievable improvements in my life, which can seem like the most insubstantial things, all add up over time. In fact, this is how big changes occur: not by a single great action, but from the culmination of many small ones.
 
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