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Just wondering...

For me it's anxiety, depression, OCD (as if!), and somatization disorder (again, no way...).

Uni-G :wink:
 
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Hi University Girl always nice to read your posts.

I have had several over the last forty years. The most accurate one which is also my most recent (about five years ago) was "intermittent, transient, stress related dissociative disorder". But I don't believe that can be found in the DSM 4. Prior to that I was diagnosed with "late chronic latent schizophrenia" (which is not in the "book either as far as I know) and the one just prior to that was schizotypal personality disorder. With depersonalization and Panic attacks. There have been others as well, too numerous to list. Once i was even diagnosed as having a "sociopathic personality disorder" . This was often given in those days to people who broke the law regarding illegal drugs. I think it is possible that many diagnosises may have a kind of "political" undercurrent about them.

If I was to venture a self diagnosis I would say i suffer from what used to be called an "inadequate personality disorder" in general I don't feel up to dealing with the trials and tribulations involved with being alive. Also I guess one could say I suffer from a Dependant and Avoidant Personality disorder as well. Of course all these diagnosises are simply words which may or may not be relevant in any case. But sometimes i feel that having a name to call a mental/emotional state may reduce the anxiety, depression or fear, associated with the confusion resulting from not understanding the nature of what one is experiencing. And a sense of specificity may prove helpful to a person in a general sense.

In my case I feel my difficulties in dealing with the world arise primarily as a result from structural defiencies in "ego" development in early childhood, rather than brain chemistry imbalances popular in todays bio chemical medical model.

I do believe however that early trauma in my life has perhaps caused certain areas in my brain to develope, or not develope, in ways which it may not have under different developmental circumstances. But again I suppose that could be said for any human being.

Hope this may prove helpful
john
 

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They say dysthymia, a word I hate because it seems to have no meaning.
 

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Although one so-called mental health professional suggested Asperger's Syndrome -- right I'm autistic.
 

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Asperger's doesn't suggest a form of autism does it? Please correct me if I am wrong.

It is believed that both Newton and Einstein had Asperger's, and in saying this I am suggesting that their genius was due in part to their overly-introspective nature, not that it is "okay" because two serious brains had it. :D

Magneto
 

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recurrent depression since about 14. 'experiencing feelings of dissociation' has been put on the gp record recently.
 

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GAD, Depression and Agrophobia

Ive had BDD as well, and that was bad enough...........

but nothing compared to this.....

My CPN said I had some 'Odd' ideas about things....

hmmm
 
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Diagnosis :

anxietydisorder, depression and depersonalization disorder (psy from the insurances)

my psy : anxiety disorder with elements of DP and depression.

cyn xxx
 

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Magneto said:
Asperger's doesn't suggest a form of autism does it? Please correct me if I am wrong.

It is believed that both Newton and Einstein had Asperger's, and in saying this I am suggesting that their genius was due in part to their overly-introspective nature, not that it is "okay" because two serious brains had it. :D

Magneto
Dalailama, agree here with Magneto, though I don't know you from Adam, and am not saying your Dx is correct. But Asperger's IS becomeing recognized more and more. I suppose one could consider it a "high functioning" autism, but it is more complex than that.

Have you read about Temple Grandin, Ph.D.? She works with animals. Oliver Sacks, M.D./neurologist has written about her. She is more disabled I would say, but is a brilliant woman who has contributed much in her field. I admire her very much.

Again there is a huge spectrum of disorders, and they are on a spectrum from more severe to very high functioning. I recently read an article that many people w/Asperger's have recognized themselves in the current description of the illness, and like us w/DP/DR feel great relief in knowing they are far from alone.

Oliver Sacks' book, An Anthropologist on Mars, discusses 7 unusual cases, and the title of the book refers to his final chapter re: Temple Grandin whom he admires very much.

Again, I certainly am not a psychiatrist or neurologist, but Asperger's is a fascinating illness that doesn't have to be seen in a negative light at all. I am not saying the Dx that doctor gave you is correct, just wanted to reiterate what I've read about the disorder.

You know, I have a much better memory re: all the psych/neurology books I've read than literature! :) Don't know if that's good or bad, or even a tad scary! :shock:

Best,
D -- NOT, I repeat NOT, a diagnostician of any person on this board. It is impossible for me to do that.
 

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P.S. -- Sacks has two quotations at the beginning of his book that I really like a lot:

"Ask not what disease the person has, but rather what person the disease has." -- Attributed to William Osler (neurologist)

"The universe is not only queerer than we imagine, but queerer than we can imagine." -- J.B.S. Haldane

Also, a fascinating read is "Shadow Syndromes" forgot the exact title and author -- about personality traits that are like certain more serious syndromes, such as Asperger's, but are NOT a viable diagnosis per se.

They reflect the HUGE spectrum of personalities we all have, and that we aren't "just one type" of person, but again, my mantra, UNIQUE

Best,
D
 
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"Shadow Syndromes" is by John Ratey, M.D. (who I actually know, long story, don't ask, lol)

He's a brilliant Harvard doc who wrote "Driven To Distraction: re: A.D.D." with Ed Hollowell many years ago. Ratey is SO A.D.D., he takes the morning mail, starts opening it as he walks through the house, and just drops pieces of it as he reads it, lol.....it's a miracle he doesn't bump into walls. Yet, he's a brilliant clinician. Go figure.

The thing that's so intriguing about Shadow Syndromes is that it shows how "normal" all mental symptoms are - the pathology is in DEGREE, not in description.

Healthier people have shades/hints of the distortions that patients suffer from - once an illness or disorder takes over, the symptoms are just exaggerations in intensity and duration of regular human mental experiences.

Peace,
Janine
p.s. I also adore Oliver Sacks!
 
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