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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi, so I'm kinda struggling with my surroundings feeling...off, in lack of a better word. It's like I feel like I'm lost, although I know, of course, that I'm not. If, for example, I'm out driving, I know exactly where I am, but sometimes I feel like I can't recognize my surroundings. for example, I'll be out driving, just down the road, no need to go further, and everything will look extremely unfamiliar. It can feel like I've never been there before, although I know for a fact that "This is Tony's house, this is where his neighbour lives, this is where H.C's grandma used to live" and so on. Anyone else get this? I'm struggling bad with derealization, but my depersonalization appears to have left me alone. So yes, does anyone else get this extreme DR where everything just looks super unfamiliar?

Also, any tips or advice? Please.

Thank you.
 

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To me, this sounds exactly like the DP that I used to have. It was horrible - intellectually recognizing your surroundings but feeling like they don't 'feel' familiar. Maybe you interpret it as DR, or maybe our experiences are slightly different. But yes, it's distressing.

As for tips, my DP would go away over time. Most important is to remind yourself you aren't crazy, otherwise you'll add to your distress. Equally important is avoiding stress/anxiety, drugs, and getting good sleep and probably exercise. I don't know - it kind of depends on what caused the DP/DR in the first place. But they typically come connected to stress/anxiety and their effect on the brain.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
To me, this sounds exactly like the DP that I used to have. It was horrible - intellectually recognizing your surroundings but feeling like they don't 'feel' familiar. Maybe you interpret it as DR, or maybe our experiences are slightly different. But yes, it's distressing.

As for tips, my DP would go away over time. Most important is to remind yourself you aren't crazy, otherwise you'll add to your distress. Equally important is avoiding stress/anxiety, drugs, and getting good sleep and probably exercise. I don't know - it kind of depends on what caused the DP/DR in the first place. But they typically come connected to stress/anxiety and their effect on the brain.
Thank you for your reply. Panic attacks and shit is what triggered my DP/DR. It was the first time too, many years ago. I recovered the first time, but this second time kinda feels worse, despite me knowing what it is this time.
 

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Things are familiar because we have memories of them. If your memory is not functioning up to par, something that should be familiar may seem unfamiliar.

Jamais vu is a temporary feeling of unfamiliarity toward something that should be familiar. It can be a symptom of a focal temporal lobe seizure, similar (but opposite) to deja vu.

Not to say that deja vu has to be a symptom of focal temporal seizure. It can be, however. Following a powerful temporal lobe seizure at 17, my family seemed unfamiliar/alien.

I knew they were my family, but my emotions were stunned by the seizure and I could not ascribe emotional coloring to the images of my loved ones.
 

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When my dpdr was at its worse I experienced a lot of that too. I remember checking my memory several times an hour to make sure I remembered where I was and what familiar things were. It was like my body was in different locations but without me being emotionally aware of it.
The one advice that really helped my DR go away a little is to not question it too much, but to instead trust yourself when it comes to your surroundings. Personally questioning made it worse for me, but by trusting that you know where you are the anxiety that comes with dpdr fades a bit. Like you said you know where you are, you know the fact that a place is a certain place, you're just not emotionally aware of it. That's obviously terrifying as well but reminding yourself that nothing is wrong with your sense of direction might help. With that said I know how difficult it is to calm yourself down when you have these feelings, it took me about 8 months to be able to look past the symptoms and actually use the tips I got. But if you ever feel that way again try to tell your anxiety that you know where you are and having these symptoms doesn't change that!
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
When my dpdr was at its worse I experienced a lot of that too. I remember checking my memory several times an hour to make sure I remembered where I was and what familiar things were. It was like my body was in different locations but without me being emotionally aware of it.
The one advice that really helped my DR go away a little is to not question it too much, but to instead trust yourself when it comes to your surroundings. Personally questioning made it worse for me, but by trusting that you know where you are the anxiety that comes with dpdr fades a bit. Like you said you know where you are, you know the fact that a place is a certain place, you're just not emotionally aware of it. That's obviously terrifying as well but reminding yourself that nothing is wrong with your sense of direction might help. With that said I know how difficult it is to calm yourself down when you have these feelings, it took me about 8 months to be able to look past the symptoms and actually use the tips I got. But if you ever feel that way again try to tell your anxiety that you know where you are and having these symptoms doesn't change that!
You're good at putting words to it. I kinda struggled with that. I listened to the dpmanual audiobooks and try to follow what the guy says there. Seems to work. Keeping busy all the time. ALL THE TIME. Pretty hard to do, but hey, symptoms lessen if I don't obsess over them, so guess the guy got a point. Thank you for the reply, really helps knowing I'm not the only one with this weird-ass symptom.
 

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"you know the fact that a place is a certain place, you're just not emotionally aware of it."

The way I have explained it, is that I recognized I could not depend on my emotions, so I had to rely on my intellect.

Things didn't seem the same, but I knew they were, It was me that was different. I think being able to make that observation may have

saved me from being psychotic. But it required me to become like

that popular Star Trek character Spock. No emotions, just reason and logic. At least until my brain was

able to rewire itself and repair some of the damage caused by my Temporal Lobe Seizure.

50 years after experiencing that seizure, my EEG still shows the pathology caused by it.
 

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You're good at putting words to it. I kinda struggled with that. I listened to the dpmanual audiobooks and try to follow what the guy says there. Seems to work. Keeping busy all the time. ALL THE TIME. Pretty hard to do, but hey, symptoms lessen if I don't obsess over them, so guess the guy got a point. Thank you for the reply, really helps knowing I'm not the only one with this weird-ass symptom.
Yeah keeping yourself busy definitely helps. The first time I actually felt my symptoms lessen was when I got so busy in school that I didn't have time for anything else. Suddenly the DR wasn't the main focus and disappeared quite a lot. But at the same time I now feel sort of emotionally numb, so I guess ignoring it and distracting yourself only works to a certain extend. At some point the anxiety has to be dealt with. But you're definitely not alone! I've had some extremely weird symptoms that make no sense too. Good luck and take care!:)
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Yeah keeping yourself busy definitely helps. The first time I actually felt my symptoms lessen was when I got so busy in school that I didn't have time for anything else. Suddenly the DR wasn't the main focus and disappeared quite a lot. But at the same time I now feel sort of emotionally numb, so I guess ignoring it and distracting yourself only works to a certain extend. At some point the anxiety has to be dealt with. But you're definitely not alone! I've had some extremely weird symptoms that make no sense too. Good luck and take care!
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Thank you. Wish you all the best.
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
"you know the fact that a place is a certain place, you're just not emotionally aware of it."

The way I have explained it, is that I recognized I could not depend on my emotions, so I had to rely on my intellect.

Things didn't seem the same, but I knew they were, It was me that was different. I think being able to make that observation may have

saved me from being psychotic. But it required me to become like

that popular Star Trek character Spock. No emotions, just reason and logic. At least until my brain was

able to rewire itself and repair some of the damage caused by my Temporal Lobe Seizure.

50 years after experiencing that seizure, my EEG still shows the pathology caused by it.
Damn...that's some scary shit. Don't you have any treatment options?
 

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Over time, I did recover quite a bit of my emotional capacity. Around age 50, I stopped having focal temporal lobe seizures.

I had ECT in 2014 for the depression, and that worked wonders for me. I still have the occasional migraine aura, and neurologists now recognize

that migraine is the borderlands of epilepsy. But, they didn't seem to understand that for 40 years. I took SSRIs for 25 years, and I'm

not sure they were very helpful. I took Klonopin during my depressive episodes and it was helpful with my anxiety.
 

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I have this on whole another level,I can't and can recognise everything at the same time.looking at anything is problem these days

mine was triggered due to panic attacks and depression
 
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