Depersonalization Support Forum banner
1 - 12 of 12 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
210 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hello everybody I came across d aspartic acid while looking for testosterone boosters and it's very interesting the effect it has on disassociation. It works on NMDA receptors which are essential in learning and excitatory processes in the brain. Interestingly enough dissasociative drugs work in contrast by slowing down NMDA firing in some cases and I found this to be interesting. Also alcohol can work on NMDA receptors which always made me feel a little better. But here is some info on NMDA receptors and drugs.

Some NMDA receptor antagonists, such as ketamine, dextromethorphan (DXM), phencyclidine (PCP), methoxetamine (MXE), and nitrous oxide (N2O), are popular recreational drugs used for their dissociative, hallucinogenic, and euphoriant properties. When used recreationally, they are classified as dissociative drugs.

D aspartic acid is an agonist and really seems to help with the clarity lost in disassociation and its cheap and not illegal. I hope this is of some use.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
210 Posts
Discussion Starter · #2 ·
yes I have and it does. I don't know how it does it but whatever receptors get turned off in DP it seems to turn them back on and I was getting very depressed for a while and that has kind of just gone away. It's remarkable.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
210 Posts
Discussion Starter · #3 ·
I don't want this to go under the radar. Maybe it won't work for everybody but I was standing outside last night at 10 o clock or so looking at the trees and it hit me that everything seemed to be planted on the ground and everything started making sense again not to mention I'm looking forward to things again. And scientifically it makes sense because of the way it works on receptors. The stuffs like 13 bucks for a months supply. Good luck people.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
821 Posts
Interesting. Im not going to jump back into the supplements again yet, am going to give my current ones a try for a while longer. But here is a list of other natural agonists. Check them out, some are cheap:

Some known NMDA receptor agonists include:


Positive allosteric modulators include:


The weird thing about this is that it shouldn't work in that the current theories are that glutamate/nmda system is overactive in DPD. I mean, this could down regulate the nmda receptors or something.. who knows. Keep us updated, very happy for you

Just looked at sarcosine:

Schizophrenia[edit]

Sarcosine has been investigated in relation to schizophrenia. Early evidence suggests that intake of 2 g/day sarcosine as add-on therapy to certain antipsychotics (not clozapine[3]) in schizophrenia gives significant additional reductions in both positive and negative symptomatology as well as the neurocognitive and general psychopathological symptoms that are common to the illness. Sarcosine had been tolerated well.[4] It is also under investigation for the possible prevention of schizophrenic illness during the prodromal stage of the disease. It acts as a type 1 glycine transporter inhibitor and a glycine agonist. It increases glycine concentrations in the brain thus causing increased NMDA receptor activation and a reduction in symptoms. As such, it might be an interesting treatment option and a possible new direction in the treatment of the mental illness in the future. A 2011 meta-analysis found adjunctive sarcosine to have a medium effect size for negative and total symptoms.[5]

Depression[edit]

Major depressive disorder is a complex disease and most currently available antidepressants aiming at monoamine neurotransmission exhibit limited efficacy and cognitive effects. N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA), one subtype of glutamate receptors, plays an important role in learning and memory. N-methyl-D-aspartic acid (NMDA) enhancing agents, such as sarcosine (N-methylglycine), have been used as adjunctive therapy of schizophrenia. Preliminary clinic trials indicated that intake of sarcosine improved not only psychotic but also depressive symptoms in patients with schizophrenia.[6]

Sarcosine is significantly more effective in treating Major Depression (substantially improved scores on the Hamilton Depression Rating Scale, Clinical Global Impression, and Global Assessment of Function) than Citalopram over a 6-week period. Sarcosine was well tolerated without significant side effects.[7]

A post here where people had mixed results from sarcosine/NAC/glycine but seemed to wear off:

http://www.dpselfhelp.com/forum/index.php?/topic/62706-glycinesarcosinenac-trial/
 
1 - 12 of 12 Posts
Top