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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
A lot of people talk about the world not feeling real, and I get that, but with my derealization its both mental and very physical sometimes. Like I just woke up and almost went to the hospital because nothing felt real and I could barely move my body, I was super dizzy, my head felt like it was being pinched. Thats why Im skeptical when people say to just do things anyway regardless of your derealization. When mine is bad it is not all mental, I can really barely walk. I cant see straight. I feel like I have the worst and most intense derealization thats ever existed. (although im sure a lot of people feel that way lol)
 

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A lot of people talk about the world not feeling real, and I get that, but with my derealization its both mental and very physical sometimes. Like I just woke up and almost went to the hospital because nothing felt real and I could barely move my body, I was super dizzy, my head felt like it was being pinched. Thats why Im skeptical when people say to just do things anyway regardless of your derealization.
Yeah, I can relate. I feel like people here construe the whole illness (or symptoms if it's just a symptom of another illness) completely differently. To some people, it seems to be some sort of existential crisis, but to others it's more of a perceptual problem. I'm definitely in the latter camp, in that DR to me is this "drunk", hazy, detached, and sometimes lightheaded feeling that I can't really impact in any way. Sometimes it also gets so bad that I can't do all the things that I normally could. Like right now, I feel pretty lightheaded and disoriented. It feels like it's a symptom of a neurological or another biological illness rather than anything else for me.

I feel like the definition is all over the place, in fact. The way I see it, there definitely should be perceptual abnormalities: for DP, the sufferer should feel detached from the self, and in DR, they should be detached from their surroundings. I don't think obsessing about "am I real? Is anything real?" and stuff like that is enough to constitute DPDR. That's just having obsessive thoughts. If obsessing about one's "realness" is DPDR, without any perceptual problems, then what is the use of the label? Is DPDR nothing but obsessing about a very specific thing? Then how does it fundamentally differ from simply having obsessive thoughts? Boom, we have a redundancy/an overlap. That is why I say thinking certain thoughts can't and doesn't constitute DPDR; you must feel a certain way.

But I think people mean that you can distract yourself from the haziness of DPDR by not thinking about it and occupying yourself with something else. However, like you said, it's pretty hard when it's so bad that you can't get through normal, everyday things as well as you should.
 
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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Sorry it took so long to reply, but your response is very helpful because thats something ive really noticed too. I dont really have "weird existential thoughts" i just feel very drunk and out of it.
 

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I can relate lulu.. the physical symptoms are actually the worst for me. I feel very sick like all over my body and inside my head. Its like my brain is on fire from the inside and i cant even do normal stuff because of it. I cant relate to people who say: just live your life and it will be gone someday.. well i can barely go to the supermarket lol, let alone be able to work.. and believe me, ive tried it all. Its not like i dont push myself to do things
 
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