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Hey guys, first time poster here. Just found this place. If it will be good or not to hang around here and fixate on my DP/DR, I don't know, but it's certainly nice to know I'm not the only one going through it. I've read a few posts and see that many of you mention going to work etc. Personally, I ended up quitting work and dropping out of University, due to my condition, as I couldn't and still struggle to manage being away from my own home/ comfort and away from my ways of distracting myself. How do those of you that hold down a job or other commitments manage to do so, without fear of having an episode, or worse, deal with an episode when you're supposed to be at work, functioning and manage to stay somewhere that you know you cannot leave for the next 8 hours, no matter how you feel, even if you just NEED to escape to your home comforts. How do you cope? What are your strategies?
 

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I've also had to quit university and don't work because of my condition. For me it's not so much about home comforts, but primarily because my cognition has sufferred a massive hit, and prolonged exposure to being back in work makes my condition deteriorate and I simply can't recover. I did go back to try and complete my degree but it was too soon and i couldn't function.

However when I was hit with dpdr in 2014 i was working and had to continue despite heavy HEAVY symptoms. I remember going to the toilet several times a day just staring at the cubicle wall pumping myself up that i could do the entire day. Sometimes when it was quiet Id take a sneaky nap, but also back then the good social environment of work helped to ground me. The work also helped keep me occupied most of the day as it was fairly manual stuff that you could just zone out and do. My main problems then aside from the staring through pinhole vision were constant violent and sexual thoughts and a pervasive feeling of losing control. Honestly back then it was a matter of grit and faith. I told myself multiple times daily I'd be fine and it was just a stage. And i was right (didnt count on my relapse 4 years later). Also i made a point of drinking a lot of water throughout the day to help manage the anxiety. I think at the end of the day when you have heavy dp you're either too ill to work or you simply need to employ whatever grit you csn muster to see you through. I think i became a bad employee though as i was thinking of myself first and foremost most of the time
 

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One thing that did help me was knowing it was just anxiety and so i told myself nomatter how bad i felt it would pass and I'd be able to function again
 

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Hey Hope for Health!,

I've DP and I work from home as a web developer. There's a friend of mine who has DP and she also works from home.

So working from home is definitely possible. But I assume you want to hear from someone who works outside of home.

Anyways be kind to yourself and take care of yourself. If by going to work you keep collecting a lot of unpleasant memories then it would be unhealthy for you.

But it depends on the nature of your condition. I've DP because of a problem in my nervous system and I'm over sensitive to sound, light and other senses.

I went to University and dropped out. I only regret I didn't drop out earlier and accepted my condition. Even after that I tried to commit to other activities such as part-time teaching. Now I wish I hadn't done those because those are very unpleasant memories.

Good Luck!

- Abe
 

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I had to lose my job, wife and family before i could even begin the recovery process. Some people in life or some daily activities hold you back in your recovery by keeping you stressed/anxious (even in a minor way). I don't regret making all those sacrifices because the recovery feeling is sweet and i want to be normal again at all times.
 

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I've been working full time for the past few years I've had the condition. It's a job I can easily zone out with my headphones on and not talk to anyone. I frequently go into this mode but I don't think it's a healthy way to be. I often regret not taking time off work when this condition started. Perhaps I would have recovered a lot faster. Maybe I should consider going off sick long term as my condition at the moment is pretty bad. My job is a soul killer. Just really mundane and repetitive and yet cognitively draining.
 
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