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Hi guys,

I haven't posted on here in a while but long story short I started experiencing brain fog/spaciness/lightheaded/derealization blah blah after using weed/alcohol.

I feel like my mind has just totally fallen apart, I have no idea how this can be caused by anxiety considering the symptoms last 24/7 and the cognitive deficits are severe. Doctors have given up on me. I've seen so many specialists and everyone just kind of shrugs. No psych meds have helped me. People tell me the brain fog is "all in my head" but it doesn't explain all the memory and executive functioning deficits I have.

In need of some support :/ Ready to call it quits.
 

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Medicine is an absurdly arrogant field, and it always has been. Ever since scientific medicine began, if the doctor couldn't diagnose your problem, then it MUST be psychological or "all in your head". This was true of epilepsy, MS, and many other illnesses before they were discovered to be neurological illnesses.

I truly believe that most people with DP / DR do have neurological problems, especially those like you and me who have admittedly subjective, though severe, problems with cognition and executive memory and function.

I haven't discovered the solution, unfortunately. And even if you were to find a doctor who believes you, there aren't any prescription meds that are universally beneficial, though many people have found at least some relief through trial and error.

I guess my best advice to you would be to look around the "recovery stories" section of the forum for people whose situations resemble yours. It could also be helpful to find a therapist who understands DP, just to have someone non-judgemental to talk to.
 

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Medicine is an absurdly arrogant field, and it always has been. Ever since scientific medicine began, if the doctor couldn't diagnose your problem, then it MUST be psychological or "all in your head". This was true of epilepsy, MS, and many other illnesses before they were discovered to be neurological illnesses.

I truly believe that most people with DP / DR do have neurological problems, especially those like you and me who have admittedly subjective, though severe, problems with cognition and executive memory and function.

I haven't discovered the solution, unfortunately. And even if you were to find a doctor who believes you, there aren't any prescription meds that are universally beneficial, though many people have found at least some relief through trial and error.

I guess my best advice to you would be to look around the "recovery stories" section of the forum for people whose situations resemble yours. It could also be helpful to find a therapist who understands DP, just to have someone non-judgemental to talk to.
Dont forget that DP may also be an overstimulated fight or flight system. Even when we dont feel like there is anyhitng wrong, our hormones could be comepltely out of whck and wouldnt even notice it besides perception and cognitive problmes.
 

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Hi Dolphin, Clinically, dissociative symptoms can be evaluated for their severity along five major dimensions: Amnesia, depersonalization (DP), derealization (DR), identity confusion, and identity alteration. In my experiences (in my capacity as a research colleague for Dr. Marlene Steinberg) many patients who self-identity with having DP or DR will, upon detailed evaluation, exhibit symptoms along one or more of the other major dimensions, such as dissociative amnesia or even some of the others. Diagnostically, this places the person into a diagnostic category beyond mere dp/dr.

As to drug-use origin of the symptoms, it is often the case that the disinhibiting nature of the drugs is what precipitated the reaction, essentially unleashing expression of dissociated emotions that had been under control up until then.

I've certainly seen cases of drug-induced DP/DR that resolved with therapy targeting the hiding of emotions and memories from oneself, usually ones reflecting chronically stressful childhood experiences.

In any event, I know lots of dissociation-aware therapists for whom your symptom cluster would sound quite familiar.
 
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