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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi,

Since I take Paxil, I feel less focused on DP. DR stays, and memory problems, and time distorstions, butI feel more happy. Less afraid of all, even DR.

I cry less, it's OK for me. I wonder if we have absolutely to do a therapy to get rid of DP. Sometimes when I read what Janine say, I am scared because I dont want to do a profound therapy, (cognitive is OK), but a psycho-analytic scares me. I do want to heal completely, but I wonder if others techniques can get rid of DP even thought I don't exorcice my oldest fears. (I still go see a psychologist, and we talk a lot about all) I feel to weak with my personality to go inside me, I feel I analyse myself since 14 months so I just doN't want to think about it anymore. I am tired, very tired. I want relief, not analysis.

Thanks!

Cynthia xxx :D (post-partum depression and DP)
 
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Discussion Starter · #2 ·
Everytime I see that The Scream, I'm convinced you've stolen the missing painting, lol...

Of course analytic therapy is not Necessary for recovery. No. Clearly, it all depends on WHY someone has symptoms in the first place, whether they're dp, dr, anxiety, or whatever.

In my opinion, intensive psychotherapy is an excellent way to try to clear symptoms up - clearly I'm a huge fan of psychoanalysis. For me, I don't know HOW I could ever have changed without something that intense, because I was about as "unmoveable" as anyone could humanly be.

But it all depends on the individual. Naturally, in my own opinion, if the cause of the symptoms is psychologically based, the person will likely need SOME kind of powerful catalyst to allow them to see/learn about themselves (which is the prerequesite for changing - which is one darn good way to make the symptoms disappear)

Also, psychoanalysis is NOT for everyone. Some people do get way too anxious in that situation. But I do personally recommend some kind of indepth psychotherapy even if it seems too "scary" - a good therapist will go at your pace. But I was running from myself fast and furious before the therapy that finally worked for me. FOR ME, there was no way I could have eliminated symptoms when I was running and hiding 24/7.

There are other ways people recover from symptoms, of course. Meds, time, life changes, etc....there are no absolutes.

Peace,
Janine
 

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This may sound odd, or somehow not right, but I am a huge fan of psychoanalysis too. I quit school and drove a truck for 3 years to put enough money away to afford psychoanalysis. That didn't work out, and I have never been able to afford psychoanalysis even if I could find a decent psychoanalyst. I have seen instead a host of therapists, none of which understood what I believed the power of psychoanalysis to be.

I tried self-analysis, the only kind of so-called self-help program that I gave a serious trial, but I couldn't make it work.

I think that developing the techniques of psychoanalysis--basically looking at dreams and free association--may have been Freud's major contribution, much more than any specific theory.

I have thought that only through these techniques, through the juxtaposition of spontaneous thoughts and ideas and dreamed images, can new information be forced into a previously closed loop, helping to destroy it.

I thought way back when that this was my only hope, and I can still think that, although it's getting a little late in the day
 
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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Janine,

Did you have classic Freudian psychoanalysis? And, not to be crass :oops: ,
but how the heck did you afford it? I know how expensive it is and how long and that you need to see the analyst several times a week. I'm sort of familiar with some sub-Freudians like Karen Horney, et al, I'm really curious.

I gave your article to my supervisor yesterday (I work in a community mental health center) and she'd actually heard of it (she's a licenced (there's no spell-check here, is there, dammit!) counselor). But she said that she hadn't run into it much outside of associative disorder.

Thanks for your story -- I just read it.

Susan
 
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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
It is surprisingly affordable. All you need to do is contact one of the good psychoanalytic institutes and say you're interested in working with an analytic candidate = that's someone currently studying the process, and while that sounds "iffy" lol...with analysis, it's not. Those folks already have advanced degrees in psych, or are already psychiatrists, they are in their own analysis and training at the top of their field. A "candidate" in training in analysis is probably more qualified than most therapists who have been practicing for years. Anyway, they cut a deal and cost is low.

My own doctor was a good egg, and like many in big cities, he worked with me on a low sliding scale.

My advice for anyone interested is to find an analyst who also practices psychtherapy - talk to that person, have a consulation or two or three and determine if you're a good choice for analysis. If so, you might work with the therapist for a while in a more conventional talk therapy situation, getting to know each other and learning to feel safe before embarking on classical analysis together.

There really isn't "Classical Freudian analysis" much anymore - I just happen to love ol' Sigmund, grin...and my psychoanalyst was very influenced by him as well. MOstly the difference is that Freudian analysis focuses on "Drive THeory" - conflicts within the psyche and heavy focus on unconscious processes and how they create symptoms. OTher ares of theory are Object Relations (closer to Karen HOrney), Self Psychology (Kohut) and the newer "Relational" that is very focused on how you interact with other people in life.

Let me know if you decide to pursue. I'd be interested.

Peace,
Janine
 
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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Thanks Janine!

I guess I'm not that crazy about Freud and psychoanalysis personally, because I don't reall trust my self-conscious. I did some guided imagery to reduce anger with a hypnotist once and I had a really hard time letting go and following my gut. She finally had to put me into a deep trance and suggest various positive things about believing myself, etc. I find it fascinating from an historical standpoint because of the importance of his work as a springboard for other philosophies like Alder, Pearles, Jung, and Rogers -- even if some were a reaction to him rather than a refinement. Maybe also the sexist thing gets me a little. :roll: What can I say, we all have our prejudices, huh?

But who knows. Cognitives sdid some good as long as I DID them -- you know how that goes. Person-centered is always good, but after a while you feel like you're just talking to a friend. I could go on and on, but I won't. I'm actually kind of interested in trying EMDR, but don't know anyone that does it.

Constantly in search of the next big drug,

Susan
 
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