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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I'm seeing things better lately, but there is an excess of floaters that concerns me.
I have heard that Floaters are a symptom of anxiety but I'm not sure.

Does anyone get a lot of floaters?

Thanks,
Santi
 

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The onset of heavy eye floaters commenced shortly after temporal lobe seizures at age 17. That was 48 years ago, and they are still with me. I theorize that even a mild insult to the temporal lobe can damage a neurological process that normally filters the floaters from your consciousness.

We're told they are harmless, but heavy floaters following a bright flash can indicate a torn retinae. That is a medical emergency.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Thanks for the information guys, really helpful:)
I am probably overreacting, will try to ignore them.

Hope you're having a nice week,
cheers(;
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
The onset of heavy eye floaters commenced shortly after temporal lobe seizures at age 17. That was 48 years ago, and they are still with me. I theorize that even a mild insult to the temporal lobe can damage a neurological process that normally filters the floaters from your consciousness.

We're told they are harmless, but heavy floaters following a bright flash can indicate a torn retinae. That is a medical emergency.
Im not sure if mine is that serious, hopefully not but ill keep that in mind, thanks:)
 

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We should probably make a sticky for a full list of DP symptoms. There's a very general one in the "Start Here" subforum.
I disagree. Not all symptoms that patients experience is directly related to DPDR. This sort of generalising is noted as a symptom of dpdr in and of itself by the psychoanalysts [link].

The symptoms of DPDR are very clearly laid down in the DSM [link]. The main characteristics of DPDR are emotional numbing and multisensory disintegration. The former is related to depersonalization while the latter is related to derealization, but both go hand in hand and are to be held accountable to an inhibitory mechanism of the frontal lobe.

Symptoms other than the ones listed in the DSM are not caused by DPDR per se. Tinnitus and visual snow have been recognised in a subgroup of patients but are respected as distinct clinical phenomena, they require different treatment. Memory, attentional and concentration (cognitive) problems are however not distinct features of DPDR, these can be observed in all psychiatric conditions including depression, anxiety disorders, bipolar, schizophrenia, personality disorders et cetera.

Some have "racing thoughts", while others have "blank mind". These have nothing to do directly with DPDR, they are phenomenological characterisations of consciousness. Even healthy patients can experience either of those. It is a spectrum we lay on, and have no control over. Mind-blanking is not recognised as a psychiatric condition, it happens in healthy patients as well [link], while racing thoughts are usually associated with anxiety but neither is "wrong" to have, both are common and normal states of consciousness.

The reason this is so paramount is because of the study I first mentioned [link]. The authors talk about how patients with DPDR associate most of their experiences and symptoms with DPDR, thereby transforming all of their lived experience to DPDR which is thought to be prolonging the disorder, as theorised by the psychoanalysts.
 

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I have a friend who is black. He believes all life experiences are directly related to his skin color. This sort of generalizing can be seen as a symptom of being black, rather than simply being human. Some believe life's parameters are clearly laid down in the bible. Others are not so religious.

My symptoms included emotional numbing, sensory disintegration, racing thoughts, ocular migraines, tinnitus, depression and anxiety. Over 40 years I saw half dozen "psychoanalysts" and several psychiatrists. All had access to the DSM, but I never received an accurate diagnosis. Then, I made my own

diagnosis after finding a case history in a British Neurological Journal that matched my own symptoms in every minute detail.

I was suffering from an rare epileptic syndrome comorbid with recurrent major depression.

I had a neurologist confirm my diagnosis by MRI and EEG. All my symptoms, except the occasional ocular migraine, went away after ECT. My conclusion is that all my symptoms were related. Or, maybe it was all a matter of my skin color?
 

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Everyone has these, but the obsessive nature of DPDR sufferers makes it easier to notice details like these.

Like how someone with hypochondria in terms of heart issues notices every skipped beat, it's nothing dangerous/important so you should just let it go.
 

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I have a friend who is black. He believes all life experiences are directly related to his skin color. This sort of generalizing can be seen as a symptom of being black, rather than simply being human. Some believe life's parameters are clearly laid down in the bible. Others are not so religious.

My symptoms included emotional numbing, sensory disintegration, racing thoughts, ocular migraines, tinnitus, depression and anxiety. Over 40 years I saw half dozen "psychoanalysts" and several psychiatrists. All had access to the DSM, but I never received an accurate diagnosis. Then, I made my own

diagnosis after finding a case history in a British Neurological Journal that matched my own symptoms in every minute detail.

I was suffering from an rare epileptic syndrome comorbid with recurrent major depression.

I had a neurologist confirm my diagnosis by MRI and EEG. All my symptoms, except the occasional ocular migraine, went away after ECT. My conclusion is that all my symptoms were related. Or, maybe it was all a matter of my skin color?
This is exactly my point though... Your condition's symptoms were accurately outlined in the British Neurological Journal, and once you found the name of your condition, you were able to treat it at its root and all the symptoms related to that condition disappeared. So yes, it was a "matter of your skin colour".

If your condition is really DPDR then your symptom clusters must match the criteria for this particular disorder. If you have other symptoms as well, then you are experiencing comorbidity, or otherwise another condition where emotional numbing or feelings of unreality are symptoms(usually other neurological conditions). But if you have an accurate diagnosis of DPDR, then the following applies to you. The definition of Depersonalization-Derealization Disorder is clearly outlined by the professionals (and well accepted by now), why would us laymen have the authority to claim otherwise and say "but I also experience back pain and stomach cramps"? You may experience visual snow syndrome and tinnitus and visual floaters long after your DPDR (emotional numbing and multisensory disintegration) dissipates.

And to my understanding this is a DPDR forum, not one for rare epileptic syndrome comorbid with recurrent major depression.
 

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I have a friend who is black.
Same.

He believes all life experiences are directly related to his skin color.
Why? That doesn't seem too rational.

This sort of generalizing can be seen as a symptom of being black, rather than simply being human.
By whom exactly are all the problems of a black person generalised to be related directly to their skin colour? The premise is completely off, black people are not disabled/diseased/ill persons merely because of their skin colour... In my argument I reference a legitimate study conducted by the leading researchers of Depersonalization-Derealization Disorder that found that patients generalise and often blame their symptoms and life experience to DPDR, even when they are not related concerns. And if you don't even trust science/researchers, then you have a lot of doubt and fear to deal with, this will definitely make DPDR recovery difficult.

Some believe life's parameters are clearly laid down in the bible. Others are not so religious.
The problem with this entire post is that the premise of your argument with the skin colour thing is not analogous to mine, and there is some considerable difference between the substantive nature of the bible and the DSM, as well as in terms of the composition of authors of these texts. The DSM is not perfect, it has its flaws. But it is a much better reference point than the imagination of the patient. I do not doubt that people with DPDR have comorbid symptoms. But they are not central to the disorder. This is of course assuming that you have primary depersonalization.
 

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As a whole, DPSH users who read research are now sending mixed messages about floaters, snow, and so on. You were saying in another post that paying extra attention to these visual phenomena, or even being distracted by them, could be a symptom of attentional problems related to DP.
Because the research isn't clear on this so far. Trials have found the angular gyrus to be a related brain region in tinnitus as well as in DPDR, and this is the region responsible for language, number processing and spatial cognition, memory retrieval, attention, and theory of mind. So there is some speculation on my part in another thread I started about some of the potential revelations of the soon-to-be-released French Trial.

We know from Anthony David's work that DPDR is a result of a mechanism that starts in the frontal lobe. A specific region in the frontal lobe is thought to inhibit limbic structures which has the effect of emotional numbing, and is thought to be mediated by an attentional mechanism, meaning that the feelings of DPDR patients are still there, but not brought into conscious awarenes. But this also has the peripheral effect of altering other attention-based phenomena. In those posts I do not suggest that DPDR is directly associated with those attention-based issues such as visual snow and tinnitus, but rather that it is likely that patients with a sensitive angular gyrus are more likely to develop these conditions. But again, I am just speculating

Then, I believe it was Teal, said that brain regions were targeted experimentally for magnetic stimulation specifically to target visual symptoms. Was he only talking about visual distortions such as flat vision?
rTMS to the TPJ of angular gyurs will likely get rid of the derealization symptoms, though in theory inhibitory rTMS to the rVLPC could also do this. I am not too knowledgeable in the specificities, Mayer-Gross on this forum know a lot more.

I agree there are a lot of people here confusing DP with anxiety, depression, general misery, and sometimes even experiences that are totally healthy and normal. I think it's a real issue for them because it piles on an extra layer of angst and confusion.
And this is exactly my point of contention.

However, what you're now deeming a DP symptom or not a DP symptom seems a bit narrow and inconsistent to me. Maybe you can help me understand this distinction you're trying to make.
I have no reason not to believe the professionals. They are the ones who experiment with this condition, and not me. No one else holds more credibility in this field than someone who devotes their occupation to mental health disorders. What I say is of trivial importance to me, because if I listen to myself I get lost in piles of uncertainty, obsession, and anxiety, and my experience has been that I am not alone in this on this forum in this regard.

And I don't understand why people keep telling Forest this is a DPSH forum. If his symptoms of feeling unreal, numb, or whatever were caused by epilepsy, what's the issue with that? What do we really know about him, anyway, and how he "treated his rare epileptic syndrome at its root?" He's said ECT for depression helped him.
Feelings of emotional numbness and unreality can accompany many many disorders that could be neurological or psychological in nature. My mother has bipolar disorder and has symptom of emotional numbing and feelings of unreality, but that isn't to say that she has DPDR. Same goes for epilepsy, these feelings can most certainly come on. This is exactly why I think that it is important to have a clear definition of the disorder. In finding an answer, we can only refer to the professionals.
 

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Maybe I'm crazy, but I don't think a 100% distinction between psychological and neurological health problems is good. It makes sense to study people who had DP triggered by anxiety or unknown causes as a unique group separate from those who had it triggered by migraine or epilepsy, at least when it comes to treatment, but that's not to say their DP is 100% different.
Their DPD isnt different. But the way you treat it certainly is.
 

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Yeah. So how much research is devoted to figuring out what these disorders actually are, versus developing treatments?
To be able to develop effective treatment you need to know what the disorder i. rTMS seems to be a potentially effective treatment for DPD and is under trialing currently, it definitely seems most promising.

Is it true that schizophrenia is still not understood?
I don't know anything about schizophrenia, but mental health problems are generally not well understood.
 

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The underlying point of my thread - "but mental health problems are generally not well understood." The uncertainty/confusion has not precluded the mental health industry from publishing V DSM manuals of dubious value, (except for

insurance billing purposes.) ,or precluded the pharmacological industry from marketing billions of dollars worth of drugs that provide 5% more relief than placebo. Being a mental health expert is a bit of an oxymoron.

We might close this thread with the following for emphasis:

"mental health problems are generally not well understood."

and when they are, we'll have appropriate diagnosis and treatments that work.
 

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I'm seeing things better lately, but there is an excess of floaters that concerns me.
I have heard that Floaters are a symptom of anxiety but I'm not sure.

Does anyone get a lot of floaters?

Thanks,
Santi
Yes, don't worry about it. It's an extremely common symptom of anxiety and depersonalization. I started seeing them when dp hit me and I've noticed it getting better when my anxiety goes down.
 

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Yes. I had my eyes checked in August with only a slight change to my perscription but a massive change in the way I see.. (at least 10 floaters, tunnel vision, blurry vision, fuzzy, visual snow..)
 

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This is exactly my point though... Your condition's symptoms were accurately outlined in the British Neurological Journal, and once you found the name of your condition, you were able to treat it at its root and all the symptoms related to that condition disappeared. So yes, it was a "matter of your skin colour".

If your condition is really DPDR then your symptom clusters must match the criteria for this particular disorder. If you have other symptoms as well, then you are experiencing comorbidity, or otherwise another condition where emotional numbing or feelings of unreality are symptoms(usually other neurological conditions). But if you have an accurate diagnosis of DPDR, then the following applies to you. The definition of Depersonalization-Derealization Disorder is clearly outlined by the professionals (and well accepted by now), why would us laymen have the authority to claim otherwise and say "but I also experience back pain and stomach cramps"? You may experience visual snow syndrome and tinnitus and visual floaters long after your DPDR (emotional numbing and multisensory disintegration) dissipates.

And to my understanding this is a DPDR forum, not one for rare epileptic syndrome comorbid with recurrent major depression.
What do you mean you may experience floaters "long"
 
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