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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
This is the collection of pills that I take every day, for (ta-da, my latest diagnosis - Agitated Depression):

20mg Cipramil (Celexa)
3* Omega 3, 6, 9 capsules.
2* 5-HTP tablets (which includes 250 RDA Vitamin B6)
1* Multi-vitamin tablet (All vitamins and minerals, A-Z)
1* Cod Liver oil tablet. (I take this specifically for my heart!)
3* 500mg Valerian tablets (in tea) before I go to bed.

.5 - 2mg of Klonopin, depending on how I feel. Somedays, some weeks none at all.

Now, simple question, do you think this is healthy? I really don't notice any positive benefits, but then again, I'm not completley miserable either. And my hair has a nice sheen to it. I'm not sure that if I stopped everything except the Ciprmail, I would notice any difference. Thoughts?
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
To be honest, I don't really think any of that stuff does diddly-squat, but since my Leaukemia I've gone a bit postal and started shoving all sorts of pills and potions down my neck. I'm meant to take extra-vitamin suppliments because of my platelet count anyway, but the rest? Probably worthless.

Saying that, I reckon if I stopped taking them I might turn to stone, crumble away, and the dust blow away in the wind......
 
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Martinelv said:
3* Omega 3, 6, 9 capsules.
2* 5-HTP tablets (which includes 250 RDA Vitamin B6)
1* Multi-vitamin tablet (All vitamins and minerals, A-Z)
1* Cod Liver oil tablet. (I take this specifically for my heart!)
Where do you get these? I've never known where to get 5-HTP tablets, and I can only find cod liver tablets with multi-vitamins...I already take a multi vitamin and mineral tablet...I know it's not going to do me any harm though.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
You can get 5-HTP, Omega 3,6,9 and Valerian from Holland and Barrats, definately. I think Boots sell them as well, except perhaps 5-HTP. It's quite expensive stuff, but usually includes Vitamin B6 in it.
 

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Dear Martin,
Well, all of these will make a difference in your body, whether or not you notice it. The questions you have to keep in mind are (1) Is it necessary? Am I wasting my money on it? and (2) Does it do me any harm? Does it fit what I have or am diagnosed with? Really, thats a very good, clean list of supplements. Like I said before, if you can stop drinking, you might be on your way to a better life. 5htp WILL increase serotonin. Thats what it will become in its next step of synthesis in your body, whether or not you notice it. Celexa- this brings me back to my post in the freaking out about meds thread. Do you think you are depressed, or do you think you have problems which stem from something temporal lobe related? Honestly, I think you have ADD with temporal lobe problems. I'd be taking Omega 3 ( we get 6 and 9 from fried foods), L-tyrosine for concentration, multivitamin ( it never hurts), cod liver oil ( for the heart) and klonopin or Lamictal. I suspect since you are still having writing binges that you should either up the Klonopin, or look into a full-fledged anticonvulsant like Lamictal or neurontin. What you are on currently, however, while not in my opinion the most efficient combo, is harmless.

Peace
Homeskooled
 

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I've tried different meds...but none of them really did much for me. Right now I take 50 mg of Zoloft and take a complex vitamin everyday. That's it. I hate meds and I feel like they screw us up more than they help us.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
I have absolutely no idea what my 'diagnosis' is anymore. I don't know if I even warrant one. The most common theme running through my numerous different diagnosis is depression, especially agitated (wft?) depression. Nobody has ever mentioned anything else except variations on that theme - not ADD, not GAD, Personality Disorder (not even borderline!!!), or even DR/DP. Depression, I've been told, is at the root of my problems. Which is weird because I never really feel depressed. Not depressed depressed anyway. But I guess depression can manifest itself in other ways. I suppose that because I function at a fairly high level, nobody really takes much notice until I self-destruct.....and then it's...'You're depressed.' Yawn.

But thanks guys. Homeskooled - you're right. Of course all these pills must be doing something to my body, but am I getting what I need out of them? I don't know if I get any benefit from Celexa...I feel like a slave to them. The only reason I take them is so that I don't get withdrawal symptoms! :roll:
 

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yeah first off its 5 didnt go to bed yet and umm full house isnt on effing tv when it should be so im pissed.

Anyway I often question what life is like with out pills, I did actually go cold turkey for a while during the summer I felt suprisingly good, I felt incredibly depressed i guess since i had no zoloft in me for a while. Like so depressed that you sometimes for no reason question how you can go on and live like you feel so incredible helpless, and to be honest i cant understand why I thought that. I guess thats depression for you.

Anyway I just want a quick fix all i want is a med to cure me, I dont want to do work. I try hard, every day I know I put up a fight... but it seems it is never good enough. So I am left with this feeling that I can sit here and hope it goes away or maybe some medicine will react on a chemical lvl and fix everything, or the drug will work on a mental level, and i will think it works like a sugar pill but think postiive. My third is that the drugs will ease the pain. I dont give a flying F if I am on drugs if they make my life easier. Drugs were put out there and there are some people who are so anti-drug or give you a hard time because they make your life easier and thats a pussy way out. Screw them I dont care, none of them will ever know the kind of pain that we go through every day.
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
Orangeaid, I know how you feel mate, I really do.

I constantly battle with "what's the point" questions....every single day. I fantasise about topping myself every day. I'm constantly hungover, constantly tired, constantly miserable, constantly aching, constantly guilty, constantly anxious, constantly unhappy!! Oh, and I feel especially guilty for moaning as I don't have DR/DP anymore. Just an aching sense of futility. But still, I someone get up and go to work. Why? Because if I don't, I'll just whither away in my bed. It's an appealing option, thinking about it as I sit here squinting at my PC in an un-airconditioned office, but one that I can't afford to indulge.

I should be happy, by rights. Got paid on Monday. Rich again. Got a new lady in my life. New flat is a bit of a shit tip, but still, I'm not living with my mummy anymore. I've got no real reason to be miserable anymore. But the happier I should be, the more miserable I get. :shock: Spent last night drinking wine and banging the b'jesus out of a lovely woman, and I felt nothing. Nothing. I laughed and joked and shagged and drank...but, nothing.

Ah, balls to it. :cry:
 

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I hope things get better for you. The fact that you found someone that well you can bang lol is nice. But maybe you can confide in her with some of your emotions or what ever. Maybe you can find something deep with this person, maybe this person will make you happy. I truely believe that all it takes is one person to make all the difference in this world and have a life worth living. I mean of course I don tknow how serious you are, but having such a relationship might really help you out.
 

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fair balls to you for gettin on with life.easy way out would be to crawl under a duvet for the rest of your life.i used to be afraid of meeting women while i went thru similar shit,ie it would be selfish of me to get a women involved with someone with dissociative issues.i mean,how can you possibly have a meaningful relationship with anyone when you think this way and feel empty.but this summer i started being honest about myself,calling my experience depression rather than dp/dr.few ran away,in fact i was surprized by the understanding i got.mental health issues effect every family on the planet,so it would seem anyway.it was a gr8 way to take the pressure off myself,and an encentive to try harder to be 'normal' and not to brood and feel sorry for myself
 

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Martin, maybe you need to get out of you and get in to helping someone else. I'm serious. If all the thrills in life aren't enough for you maybe you need to soften someone else's suffering.

Is this something you would even consider or are you immediately put off by the thought?

It could be like a movie where you do something like this, meet the woman of your dreams who also helps the needy, and the rest of your world becomes a place of peace.

There, go make a movie.
 

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Discussion Starter · #16 ·
Cheers guys.

The more I think about then the more I tend to think that, as Scattered pointed out, that I may have 'Anhedonia' - the inability to 'feel' experiences. Whether this is a symptom of depression, or something else, I don't know. It's strange.

I've really started thinking about this, although I know I shouldn't. Thinking back over my life, I can't ever really remember enjoying anything. Or rather - I can't remember anything other that fleeting moments of pleasure. Not sex, food, love, achievements, nothing. Even when the girl of my dreams told me that she loved me.....hmm. Perhaps I'm expecting too much though. Perhaps it's because I expect fireworks and the earth moving(and I do, even now) which is rare in reality, then I've become conditioned to not feel anything. Perhaps I try to enjoy the 'small things in life', like I've always been told to. Hmm.....

Terri* - I've tried that one. For example - I sent my parents away on Holiday to Thailand. Momentary pleasure when they reacted with happyness and appreciation, but it soon faded. Or when, to get back to obvious, help an old lady cross the road. Yes, my chest puffs out for a moment, but then - eegggh. I also give money to three different charities each month. So what I ask myself. Sigh.

Back on the female theme (apologies to the ladeeez, this isn't meant to be derogatory or sexist in anyway...it's just the truth), well, I'm a bit scared to be honest. In the past if there has been one thing that was absolutely guaranteed to rid me (temporarily) of anxiety then it was women. Now, after two goddam dates, I've completely lost interest and am back to sizzling in anxiety. What next? Heroin? I think I'll be the worlds first person not to get addicted to Heroin because I got bored of it. (Disclaimer etc)
 

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sigh...well I was thinking something more along the lines of working with people against landmines or something huge like that.

alas, you must have that anedonia. :(

can it be "fixed" ?
 

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Discussion Starter · #18 ·
I see where you're coming from. Something life-threatening eh? Why don't you just get on a plane and come over and chase me through the woods with a shotgun. :( Actually, that would be quite kinky. But that's another story.

I don't know anything about it, except for what Scattered posted. I'm going to spend the afternoon obsessively looking up Anedonia up on the internet. Once I'm satisfied that I've 'got' it, then I'll go home and obsessively worry about it there too.

:shock:
 

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It has an "h" in it. Anhedonia. Looks like you've got it. :(

Booking my ticket now to chase you thru the woods. I'm kind of bored myself. :p

Really not funny. Off to find a cure.
 

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Well, looks like it's off to Maudsley for you. Is that where the IoP is? Really, this could be exactly what is happening to you. It "reads" like what is happening to you.

Anhedonia

Written by Colin Brennan, medical journalist

Anhedonia, the inability to gain pleasure from normally pleasurable experiences - a concept first identified in the 1890s - is throwing new light on depression in ground breaking research at the Institute of Psychiatry, London.

Anhedonia was largely ignored throughout the 20th Century in favour of more obvious symptoms of depression, which include low mood, poor concentration, tiredness, disturbed appetite and sleep, feelings of guilt and suicidal thoughts. But since the late 1980s, anhedonia has been recognised as a core symptom of depression, and is also present in schizophrenia and other mental disorders.

It is best described by examples. An anhedonic mother gains no joy from playing with her baby, a footballer is no longer excited when his team wins, a teenager is left unmoved by passing their driving test.

Anhedonia and depression

Not everybody suffering from depression has anhedonia, according to consultant psychiatrist Dr Tonmoy Sharma of the Maudsley Hospital, London. Many people who go into mild depression can be cheered by 'tea and sympathy'. But in severe depression, anhedonia becomes a serious problem.

'It's worse than not being able to get any joy from life,' says Dr Sharma. 'People in this state have an incredibly flat mood. They can't react properly or feel anything. There is no modulation of mood at all. They can't take things forward.' Depression strikes one in every five people at some time in their lives and is a potentially fatal illness through suicide. Anhedonia places a great strain on relationships and is usually accompanied by a loss of sex drive. Anhedonia can continue after depression, but usually it goes away at the same time.

Depression is often called the 'invisible illness'. Victims hide their symptoms for fear of being seen as unable to cope or as miseries. It can be triggered by a sad event like a bereavement, by a physical illness or by imbalances in brain chemistry that come apparently out of the blue. The desire to remove the stigma from depression and to find better treatments prompted Dr Sharma and his team in the Section of Cognitive Psychopharmacology at the Institute of Psychiatry to research anhedonia.

Watching the brain in action

Antidepressant medicines only partially deal with anhedonia symptoms. Dr Sharma hopes to identify specific areas of the brain involved with the problem. It might be that the limbic system, which has already been linked with pleasure, might be shown to work differently in people with anhedonia. Then it would be possible to target this area either with existing drugs, which can be shown to work, or with new medicines or psychological treatments.

Dr Sharma's team is using a new imaging technique called functional magnetic resonance imaging - fMRI - that scans the brain at work. Some differences in the brains of depressives have already been observed. For example, in comparison with healthy volunteers, depressives have smaller hippocampi - the area that deals with emotion - larger white matter lesions and differences in brain metabolism.

A previous study found that when depressed people were shown film clips designed to cause passing sadness, they activated areas of the brain - the left medial prefrontal cortex and the right anterior cingulate gyrus - that were not involved in the reaction of a group of healthy controls. The investigators suggested that this might disconnect the limbic system from the normal prioritisation of emotional importance. In this new study the brains of people with anhedonia are being examined.

In an interview with NetDoctor, Dr Tonmoy Sharma explains his research methods by saying that as he is talking, he is using the brain cells at the front part of his brain. The increase in neural activity in this area means there is an increased need for oxygen. This is delivered by the haemoglobin, which carries oxygen in the blood to all the cells of the body. When this happens, there is a difference in the magnetic properties between oxygenated haemoglobin and deoxygenated hemoglobin as the oxygen is brought to the active area of the brain, which is picked up by the MRI scan.

'We are treading new ground,' he says. 'Instead of just looking at the structures of the brain, we are examining its functioning. We are seeing the changes in the brain as they happen.'

Not only can the activity of the brain be recorded when the person moves or signals the answer to a question by pressing a button, it can also be observed when the brain is active during thinking or planning.

When a rose lover loses the ability to take pleasure even from the most luscious bloom, the researchers hope to be able to discover the normal reaction of the brain to the fragrance of a rose. They will be able to pinpoint the normal reaction, then observe when that's absent.

The search for treatments

The next step is to see what effects medicines and psychological therapy have on the brain. The brain can be scanned after the volunteer has been given antidepressive medicines to see what is happening. There are drugs that can treat depression successfully, but it is not known which drugs react on which parts of the brain. 'This is something that will be exciting to discover,' says Dr Sharma. 'When we know the effects on the brain of pharmacological and psychological therapies for depression, it will help us predict who is going to get depressed and also who is going to respond to treatment and what kind of treatment and who is likely to relapse. We will also be able to monitor the effects of the drugs as we give them.'

In the research, volunteers are shown film clips such as the famous comic orgasm scene from the movie When Harry met Sally, and slides to invoke emotions in people while they are having fMRI scans. If patients with depression and anhedonia show patterns of activity different from those who respond positively to the images, it will provide information on the pleasure responses in the brain and identify abnormalities.

Dr Sharma believes that when it is clearly demonstrated that depressive illness is caused by physical changes in the brain, even if it is triggered by life events or illness, the stigma attached to it will be removed. 'These are important advances that do give new hope for people who have suffered from depression and change our understanding of the illness,' he said.

S
 
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