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HEY, don't worry. Mistakes are made by the best. Props to the cops for not taking you down, they must have been compassionate as tbh they could chuck the book at you. (unfair, but sometimes they aren't as understanding)

So you got away with it, learnt a lesson, maybe this will help you get more support, the treatment you need in the first place.

Drug taking is misunderstood by society but it's coming out, with many famous people helping shed light, which every time I seen one in the news, it's sad but it's common, will happen 1 in 3 for depression and anxiety. You didn't take them tablets for any other reason than relief. Now it's time to see a professional about getting that relief (maybe you are already seeing one, i'd tell them it's obviously not working)... this may seem like a huge set back, but take it positively, you are still here, it will be a building block to a brighter future.

On the family side, i know how it is to let people down. If you wanna hear my story (if it helps to not feel alone) i've a dark one, i've nothing to hide, i OD'd last year, so I know all about it, best thing you can do is simply say 'i'm sorry' and ask for help. Once you clear the air, it's done, in this life that's all you can do... once you get forgiveness, forgive yourself and move forward... honestly once you do that, i'd not even consider it as you or a mark. A weak moment, everyone has one... i'd see this as a sign you need to step up your support network, not yourself. (obviously learn from this experience and how medication has guide limits not for boring reasons...)

As for the other worries, the most 'sane' person in the world with a cocktail won't be, psychiatric drugs affect how the brain works, so no matter who you are, you can end up lets say 'not being yourself'. I can think of loads of examples, but an easy one is friends who I was drinking with who were on Acid, usually needed a lot of guidance, no matter how drunk i was, they 'couldn't see the wood for the trees' so we say.

You are back to reality, it was a bad experience, from writing this, you've learnt, time to move on (after an apology, it takes a lot of spirt, but now's the time i'd say to call the family, have a short 5 minute meeting, explaining how you feel, why, and that you are sorry....this happens in life)

All my opinion but based on what i've learnt. Most my biggest regrets were not really what I did wrong, but not owning them and saying sorry when I should have, you, I, no one is perfect, it's an impossible standard and in this case, it simply was not you.

Let it set you free and more importantly, get help, now more services should be open (to shed some positivity). You will be okay and more
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
HEY, don't worry. Mistakes are made by the best. Props to the cops for not taking you down, they must have been compassionate as tbh they could chuck the book at you. (unfair, but sometimes they aren't as understanding)

So you got away with it, learnt a lesson, maybe this will help you get more support, the treatment you need in the first place.

Drug taking is misunderstood by society but it's coming out, with many famous people helping shed light, which every time I seen one in the news, it's sad but it's common, will happen 1 in 3 for depression and anxiety. You didn't take them tablets for any other reason than relief. Now it's time to see a professional about getting that relief (maybe you are already seeing one, i'd tell them it's obviously not working)... this may seem like a huge set back, but take it positively, you are still here, it will be a building block to a brighter future.

On the family side, i know how it is to let people down. If you wanna hear my story (if it helps to not feel alone) i've a dark one, i've nothing to hide, i OD'd last year, so I know all about it, best thing you can do is simply say 'i'm sorry' and ask for help. Once you clear the air, it's done, in this life that's all you can do... once you get forgiveness, forgive yourself and move forward... honestly once you do that, i'd not even consider it as you or a mark. A weak moment, everyone has one... i'd see this as a sign you need to step up your support network, not yourself. (obviously learn from this experience and how medication has guide limits not for boring reasons...)

As for the other worries, the most 'sane' person in the world with a cocktail won't be, psychiatric drugs affect how the brain works, so no matter who you are, you can end up lets say 'not being yourself'. I can think of loads of examples, but an easy one is friends who I was drinking with who were on Acid, usually needed a lot of guidance, no matter how drunk i was, they 'couldn't see the wood for the trees' so we say.

You are back to reality, it was a bad experience, from writing this, you've learnt, time to move on (after an apology, it takes a lot of spirt, but now's the time i'd say to call the family, have a short 5 minute meeting, explaining how you feel, why, and that you are sorry....this happens in life)

All my opinion but based on what i've learnt. Most my biggest regrets were not really what I did wrong, but not owning them and saying sorry when I should have, you, I, no one is perfect, it's an impossible standard and in this case, it simply was not you.

Let it set you free and more importantly, get help, now more services should be open (to shed some positivity). You will be okay and more
This means more than you could know, thank you.
 

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Sounds like the medication has reacted to the alcohol. Don't worry hun we all make mistakes. I was on Citalopram and drank alot of wine, next thing I knew I was running around my house naked trying to kick my husbands face in....I literally went into some form of break down, I was acting very strange & I was acting out of character. We all make mistakes babe. Try not to worry. Xx
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
This is freaking scary. hope you feel better now.
It was very scary. I've never acted like this under any substances, besides a drunken argument here and there. Just goes to show how much medications can change our thinking.
 

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STAY AWAY FROM "ALCOHOL"

It is one of the worst things anybody could do when their mental health is in bad shape....It causes havoc with meds and is a depressant in its own right...

Im guessing you had whats known as a BLACKOUT...Very common for some people when they drink too much and especially when it is mixed with psychiatric medicines...

Does anybody ever even read the labels on medicines..."Avoid alcohol" Its actually written on there for a reason...

You will be ok...Just learn a lesson from it and move on...
 

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I wasn't aware that alcohol and escitalopram (Lexapro) were incompatable. My psych knows I sometimes drink moderately (too much by medical standards), and has never pointed it out.

I haven't noticed any adverse effects from the combo, and I haven't had a drink of alcohol in several months. Prior to my neurological/psychiatric trauma at age 17, I felt I was a fairly normal person. After the change in my personality and mental

health, I desperately wished I were "normal" again. There were so many things in life I wanted to do, as a normal person, that I felt unable to do as a mentally ill person.

But, I certainly didn't want to recover for the purpose of taking psychoactive drugs again.

If I were a medical professional working on dp/dr, and I thought patients wanted to recover just so they could enjoy getting high again, I would find another specialty

while thinking to [email protected] em, let them suffer.
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
I wasn't aware that alcohol and escitalopram (Lexapro) were incompatable. My psych knows I sometimes drink moderately (too much by medical standards), and has never pointed it out.

I haven't noticed any adverse effects from the combo, and I haven't had a drink of alcohol in several months. Prior to my neurological/psychiatric trauma at age 17, I felt I was a fairly normal person. After the change in my personality and mental

health, I desperately wished I were "normal" again. There were so many things in life I wanted to do, as a normal person, that I felt unable to do as a mentally ill person.

But, I certainly didn't want to recover for the purpose of taking psychoactive drugs again.

If I were a medical professional working on dp/dr, and I thought patients wanted to recover just so they could enjoy getting high again, I would find another specialty

while thinking to [email protected] em, let them suffer.
I think it depends on the person. Some people can handle it, the fact that I drank during the beginning stages of taking it (the most crucial imo) was really irresponsible. I noticed fluctuations in my mood in the weeks prior, so I was probably a prime candidate for something weird happening.. add the benzo onto that and it is a recipe for disaster.
 
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