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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Sorry to keep posting about my drug rehab...but it has been rough and I tend to need reassurance...

A few days ago, I took yall's (sorry i live in the south) advice and spilled the beans to both my doctor and my parents----By spilled the beans I mean that I told them that over the summer I was abusing a tremendous amount of opiates.

I spoke with the dr for a long time and luckily, he didn't simply through me into some NA class....

I haven't used in over a month, however the mental cravings seem to be getting worse....The doctor prescibed me, "Bupronex" which apparently, blocks the opiate receptors of the brain.

Today is my second day on the drug and it works lovely.

Anyone have any information on this drug? Why does it work? Is it right for my situation? Interactions?

Basically, I want to know the pro's and con's.

Please, if anyone has ANY info or opinions, please voice them!

Also, in a way, this drug makes me feel almost the same way I did when I was using opiates which makes me kind of wonder whether or not this drug works, or is just simply masking things.

The way I take the dose is weird and as the doc explained it to me, i didnt really understand.

Please enlighten me if you can!

p.s. I apologize thoroughly for polluting this board with talks about drug recovery---At least I'm on the road to recovery, i hope.
 

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good for you bunk

i dont know anything about the med but it seems to be doing the trick for you so doc must know what he's about. best of luck
 
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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
I just don't understand the fact that while I am going through Opiate withdrawl, I am being given a medicine that causes me to feel almost the same way I feel when I am actually high on opiates---which im trying to stop
 

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ok heres my take on it

i started an ssri just over 2 weeks ago due to depression and dp. over the first week i basically went through all the bad head states i'd been through in like 15 years: negative e, bad acid, despair, unbearable anxiety, full on dp/dr. at least yours is a nice state. anyway what i've heard is that because the med is working on the bit of brain that needs fixed it causes alot of activity there, hence the side effects. if nothing was wrong there you wouldn't get these side effects possibly. side effects wear off. i'm only talking about ads here so don't know if this is relevant to your meds
 

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hi Bunk,

i did a copernic search on this new med and found out some great information. it sounds like truly an amazing med with little turn around as to helping you get over the opiate craving. read up on it. very interesting.

hey, continued good luck on the work you are doing.
terri
 

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Opiates
Opium, codeine, morphine, heroin
The opioids include both natural opiates - that is, drugs from the opium poppy - and opiate-related synthetic drugs, such as meperidine and methadone.
The opiates are found in a gummy substance extracted from the seed pod of the Asian poppy, Papaver somniferum. Opium is produced from this substance, and codeine and morphine are derived from opium. Other drugs, such as heroin, are processed from morphine or codeine.

Opiates have been used both medically and non-medically for centuries. A tincture of opium called laudanum has been widely used since the 16th century as a remedy for "nerves" or to stop coughing and diarrhea.

By the early 19th century, morphine had been extracted in a pure form suitable for solution. With the introduction of the hypodermic needle in the mid-19th century, injection of the solution became the common method of administration.

Heroin (diacetylmorphine) was introduced in 1898 and was heralded as a remedy for morphine addiction. Although heroin proved to be a more potent pain killer (analgesic) and cough suppressant than morphine, it was also more likely to produce dependence.

Of the 20 alkaloids contained in opium, only codeine and morphine are still in widespread clinical use today. In this century, many synthetic drugs have been developed with essentially the same effects as the natural opium alkaloids.

Opiate-related synthetic drugs, such as meperidine (Demerol) and methadone, were first developed to provide an analgesic that would not produce drug dependence. Unfortunately, all opioids (including naturally occurring opiate derivatives and synthetic opiate-related drugs), while effective as analgesics, can also produce dependence. (Note that where a drug name is capitalized, it is a registered trade name of the manufacturer.)

Modern research has led, however, to the development of other families of drugs. The narcotic antagonists (e.g. naloxone hydrochloride) - one of these groups - are used not as painkillers but to reverse the effects of opiate overdose.

Another group of drugs possesses both morphine-like and naloxone-like properties (e.g. pentazocine, or Talwin) and are sometimes used for pain relief because they are less likely to be abused and to cause addiction. Nevertheless, abuse of pentazocine in combination with the antihistamine tripelennamine (Pyribenzamine) was widely reported in the 1980s, particularly in several large cities in the United States. This combination became known on the street as "Ts and blues." The reformulation of Talwin, however, with the narcotic antagonist naloxone has reportedly reduced the incidence of Ts and blues use.

So I'm thinking you don't need to know where they can be found, JC. :shock:

These drugs are great for short and long term chronic pain but as you can see, so powerfully addictive.
 

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I think you might be obsessing a little too much about the where and why and what...if it works, it works! As long as you're not having bad side effects or something, may as well stick with it. It sounds like a drug called Naltrexone, which at one time was studied to see if it helped with DP. So, you may be on the right track anyway!
 
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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
think you might be obsessing a little too much about the where and why and what...if it works, it works!
Everyone who knows me says the same thing....very true
 
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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
Indeed...Progress is progress.

There is in fact light at the end of the tunnel (unfortunately the tunnel seems to be 234345 miles long) but we will reach the end eventually.
 
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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
Indeed...Progress is progress.

There is in fact light at the end of the tunnel (unfortunately the tunnel seems to be 234345 miles long) but we will reach the end eventually.
 
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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
Bunk! Good job!!! You should be very happy to be doing so well!!! Kicking the monkey is hard and you are sounding so well. Congrats and keep up the good work!

Carla
 
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Discussion Starter · #15 ·
Bunk! Good job!!! You should be very happy to be doing so well!!! Kicking the monkey is hard and you are sounding so well. Congrats and keep up the good work!

Carla
 
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