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You are certainly not the first to come to that observation (though of course it also just depends on how you define “intelligent”). I think a lot of people here can relate to that internal sense though. It could also be that the DPDR forced us to think in more abstract intellectual ways than the average person on the street whose concerns are school, friends, jobs, careers, eating food, getting drunk and getting laid, etc.
 

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Like Chip implied, I think it's probably the other way around. DPDR stops you and makes you think, and this leads to intellectual growth.
 
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I read the biography of Craig Venter. He was a bright young guy intent on avoiding responsibility and

enjoying life.

He dropped out of school. Without a deferment, the US Navy drafted him and sent him to Vietnam.

He worked on a hospital ship treating combat injured US Marines. Seeing young men like himself,

whose lives had been permanently altered by war, was a wake up call. It was time to get serious about life.

He returned to the US after his tour, and earned a Phd from U of California. He devised a process

to decode the human genome. Scientists had predicted it might take 20 years. Ventner accomplished it

in a few short years. The genius was there. He just needed a little motivation.
 

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I remember an odd incident in my 4th year of Catholic grammar school. I guess my class had recently been give a standard IQ test by the diocese. I'm sitting at my little desk in a row with my classmates

when my teacher and an unknown lady (from the diocese?) approach me. They look at me strangely and say Bill, you have an IQ of 147". The look on their faces seemed to demand an explanation.

I didn't even know what they were talking about, so I was like...."did someone report one missing?" LOL. I guess I was the last person they would expect to have an above average IQ.

When I look back on it, I think.....if my mom hadn't been a smoker, I could have had an IQ of 160! (A regular damn genius!) As it is, I get by on beer and rock and roll. If you prefer wine and symphony, I can respect that.

Einstein is alleged to have said " If you want your children to be intelligent, read them fairy tales. If you want them to be more intelligent, read them more fairy tales.?"

I don't envy people who are extremely intelligent. Their homework was a lot harder than mine.
 

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I remember an odd incident in my 4th year of Catholic grammar school. I guess my class had recently been give a standard IQ test by the diocese. I'm sitting at my little desk in a row with my classmates
when my teacher and an unknown lady (from the diocese?) approach me. They look at me strangely and say Bill, you have an IQ of 147". The look on their faces seemed to demand an explanation.
I didn't even know what they were talking about, so I was like...."did someone report one missing?" LOL. I guess I was the last person they would expect to have an above average IQ.
When I look back on it, I think.....if my mom hadn't been a smoker, I could have had an IQ of 160! (A regular damn genius!) As it is,

I get by on beer and rock and roll. If you prefer wine and symphony, I can respect that.​

Einstein is alleged to have said "
If you want your children to be intelligent, read them fairy tales. If you want them to be more intelligent, read them more fairy tales.?"​

I don't envy people who are extremely intelligent. Their homework was a lot harder than mine.​
Lol. You're a riot, forest! ????
 

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I agree that i think its the dpdr that makes people seem more intellectual. Though i have noticed that alot of people ive talked too described their life before dp/dr as being quite emotional. I myself, was always a very sensitive and emotional person. Maybe too much. Sometimes i still am (im basically recovered from dpdr). Ive also had alot of emotional hardship and mild traumas in my life as well. Having an emotional upbringing or being naturally sensitive might be a common personality trait for people with dpdr (possibly).
 

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I agree that i think its the dpdr that makes people seem more intellectual. Though i have noticed that alot of people ive talked too described their life before dp/dr as being quite emotional. I myself, was always a very sensitive and emotional person. Maybe too much. Sometimes i still am (im basically recovered from dpdr). Ive also had alot of emotional hardship and mild traumas in my life as well. Having an emotional upbringing or being naturally sensitive might be a common personality trait for people with dpdr (possibly).
I don't know about people with dp/dr being more intelligent or intellectual in the traditional sense but I have to agree that people with dp/dr are probably more likely to be sensitive and more emotional than most. It is the intense negative emotional state that usually causes the dp switch to turn on in the brain. There are exceptions such as epilepsy causing dp. This is as far as I understand it. A high level of sensitivity is a form of intelligence in my eyes anyway. I hope so anyway because that's about all I've got! My general knowledge is terrible. I'm useless at quizzes and I don't appear to have much common sense. I do recall day to day events better than most though. My thinking is usually on a complete different wavelength to whatever everyone around me is thinking. I don't think it's because of DP, it's just the way I've always been. I recommend everyone does an MTBI personality test if you're interested in this kind of thing. I'm an INFP according to that test.
 

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I don't know about people with dp/dr being more intelligent or intellectual in the traditional sense but I have to agree that people with dp/dr are probably more likely to be sensitive and more emotional than most. It is the intense negative emotional state that usually causes the dp switch to turn on in the brain. There are exceptions such as epilepsy causing dp. This is as far as I understand it. A high level of sensitivity is a form of intelligence in my eyes anyway. I hope so anyway because that's about all I've got! My general knowledge is terrible. I'm useless at quizzes and I don't appear to have much common sense. I do recall day to day events better than most though. My thinking is usually on a complete different wavelength to whatever everyone around me is thinking. I don't think it's because of DP, it's just the way I've always been. I recommend everyone does an MTBI personality test if you're interested in this kind of thing. I'm an INFP according to that test.
Being good at tests isn't exactly the kind of "intelligence" that seems to be associated with DP, in my view. It's more of the type of "if I could harness my thoughts and put them on paper or design an experiment, I could potentially revolutionize some academic field" type of intelligence. Very abstract, outside the box type thinking. At least that's been my experience.

I think I was an INTJ. Though the J and P were almost equal. But definitely INT.
 

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I studied electronics technology and found quite a bit of insight into my brain processes in doing so. Form follows function is a phrase attributed to 19th and 20th century architects. The function of most simple mechanical devices can be discerned by their shape and construction.

That's why the brain is so difficult to understand. It's form gives no clue as to its function. I digress. I agree that sensitive people are prone to dp/dr. I also agree that trout and other game fish are the first to disappear when a waterway becomes polluted. Eventually, all you have left are bottom feeders

ie.' carp and catfish. When they leave, the waterway becomes flammable. Before the advent of Digital Volt Meters (DVMs), electronics technicians used Simpson Ammeters to measure voltage, current and resistance. The meters used a wand attached to a coil which acted as an electromagnet. The measured current flowed through the coil, causing it to deflect in proportion

to the amount of current being measured. The coil was sensitive, and resistors had to be switched into the coil circuit to increase the range of current to be measured. Increasing the range decreased the meters sensitivity. If the technician forgot to set the proper range, excessive current caused excessive deflection of the wand, which would then

hit the peg at the end of its travel range. Enough current would cause the wand to bend around the peg. This was not an uncommon occurrence and was aptly called "pegging the meter".Now it was broken and required repair.

Brain researchers have noted that the temporal lobe is exquisitely prone to insult. The temporal lobe is the seat of your emotions. If you are emotionally sensitive, your temporal lobe may be set to the

sensitive range. Unfortunately, there is no adjustment. Repeated pegging of your emotional meter may result in emotional dysfunction ie;, dp/dr. (emotional numbing, anger/rage, suicide, anorexia, etc). I don't think epilepsy is the exception to this phenomena. Temporal lobe epilepsy is the most common form of epilepsy. If your sensitive temporal lobe gets

pegged frequently enough, you might develop the aberrant electrical storms that define the condition. Bad psychoactive trips can also peg your meter. Most psychoactive drugs target receptors in the temporal lobe. During my cannabis intoxication, my wand wrapped around my peg about 3 times. LOL

Sadly, there isn't any known repairs when that happens. And, Large Scale Integrated circuit chips share the brain's ability to conceal function. When an electronics manufacturer asserts their proprietary right to conceal how they do things, they can simply remove identifying marks from the Integrated Circuit Chips they use.

All you have to work with, is how many pins the chip has. To reverse engineer the circuit, you would have to determine the clock frequency being used, and use a logic scope to monitor the activity on the ICs pins to determine what it might be, and what it might be doing in the circuit. Or, you can sand layers of the chip, micron by micron,

to discover its internal architecture. This type of reverse engineering is actually done when nations steal each others tech secrets. And, it sounds really difficult, so where the hell am I going with it? It's just to note that as tedious as this process is, it doesn't compare to trying to figure out how the brain works.
 

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Typology, generally speaking, is nonsense. That includes MBTI. Your personality is dynamic, not static, for one. Second, Jung's cognitive functions are outdated, not to mention frameworks created by people who ripped off his functions. I don't even want to call Big 5 legit, because there are career tests based on Big 5 and that's bullshit.

If someone told you, "You're supposed to act this way because you're Sagittarius," or, "You're supposed to act this way because you're INTJ," please try not to entertain it. It's pretend time masquerading as something more legitimate. I'm only railing this hard against MBTI because we're on a mental health, self-help forum. I don't mean to offend anyone.

I've scored pretty consistently XNTX, except for emotional periods where I scored XNFX. The best thing I can say about it is to give new modes of thought and behavior a try. Don't constrain or limit yourself based or typology, or what your current mode of being is indicating to you.
Your personality is dynamic, yes, unless an unwavering belief in the MBTI makes it artificially static, that is.
 
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