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Today my best(?) friend was talking about how she wanted to get out of doing a presentation and I said she should just write that she has social anxiety disorder on the top of her essay. She said she could get a doctor's note and we were making jokes about it and at one point I suggested she have my sister write a note signed "BA in psychology, MSU," and then my friend said, "And schizophrenic!!!" And laughed. I almost flipped out but I opted for the look of death, which she didn't even notice. Then she said, "Would she even answer her phone?" ...she was making fun of her because she is so out of touch with the world. I just said, "No, she doesn't have a cell phone anymore," and walked away. I realize I've been a bitch to her lately, but she honestly wasn't trying any passive agressiveness. She's not smart enough for that. She was just being totally careless. I have a very wide-expanding sense of humor, but correct me if I'm wrong, that's just NOT funny. I don't joke about my sister, so what gives HER the right to? I wanted to smack her hard enough to make her realize what she had just done and say, "She's smarter than YOU will ever be even with schizophrenia," but for once, I held it in and left the room.
 

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hmmm...i can see why that would be maddening but have you ever talked with her about how it bothers you when she does that? if you have, then she is a complete poop-stain...but if you haven't, perhaps she has no idea how sensitive that issue is.
 

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As much as it was hard to let it go - you did the right thing. You walked away from that situation more of a grown up than you did when you walked into it, and I don't mean that in a condescending tone at all.

People, unfortunately, do not realize how words can affect a person. I am just as guilty of this at some points in my life.

Maybe she will come back with an apology?
 
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She doesn't know how painful it is and how protective you feel about your sister and her problem. If she's not that bright, she might not understand very well, but you could still tell her that mental illness is more difficult to deal with than physical illness, (John Galsworthy said it was the most tragic of afflictions), and that your sister's problem hurts you too much to ever joke about. We all have things that hurt us too much to take lightly, so hopefully she'll start to understand. I grew up in an emotionally stagnant family and had to learn to care about and understand others from my outside relations - friends and their families. She might even surprise you, given time.
 
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