Depersonalization Support Forum banner

1 - 7 of 7 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
783 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Have you received bone fractures of any type since using Paxil?
Yes, one.00.00%
Yes, more than one.16.67%
No.1493.33%
Maybe.00.00%
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
783 Posts
Discussion Starter · #2 ·
Ok, this is a long shot. My bones appear to have lost density since I went on Paxil. If you've read my website you'll know what I'm talking about. After searching on line to see if there is a link between Paxil and bone density loss, to my surprise I found another girl with a story similar to mine.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
369 Posts
maybe you're going through menopause :p
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
258 Posts
Even if Paxil was responsible for a loss in bone density, it would still take many years on the medication to be of any real conern.

The highest rate of bone density loss is commonly shown in astronauts while they are in the null gravity enviornment of space:

..the Station crew lost interior bone at a rate of 2.2 to 2.7 percent for each month in space and outer bone at a rate of 1.6 to 1.7 percent per month. 1
So even if you were experiencing a 1/4 of the losses found in the astronauts which is still highly unlikely, it would still take you well over 60 months to have a reduction of 30% where of which Im guessing a persona may have problems with bone density.

A PSU website on oestoperosis states that
Like all living tissue, our bones are constantly repairing and renewing themselves. This process is called remodeling.The bone cells responsible for demolition are the osteoclasts. These cells secrete an acid that dissolves old bone. As they work, calcium and other minerals are released from the dissolved bone into the blood stream. Therefore, when your body needs extra calcium, it signals the osteoclasts to dissolve more bone. 2
Paxil would have to be linked in effecting the osteoclasts in the cycle of remodelling, or in a lowering of the calcium levels which are free to be used during the process.

I was on Paxil for near on 7 years and had both maintained and added excellent bone density and muscle strength throughout the period thanks to a regular gym routine. Its not something I'd be overly worried about if I were you.

_______________________
1. http://www1.nasa.gov/home/hqnews/2004/m ... _loss.html
2. http://www.creatinghealth.psu.edu/osteo/calcium.html
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
783 Posts
Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Thanks Nemesis. Here's why I am concerned:

In 2000 I hiked a 77 km long trail in 6 days with nearly 40 pounds on my back. It was difficult but amazing. In 2003 I recieved a stress fracture in my foot upon flexing my foot after a 1.5 hr hike. After healing this fracture I received another stress fracture in an adjacent bone of the same foot while doing a 2 day hike. A bone scan shows I am mildly osteopenic (osteopenia is the precursor to osteoporosis). A bone specialist says I am not finished laying down all of my bone mass and so my bones are a bit less dense than the average person my age. My question: So why did I not break my foot when I did the 77 km long hike??? Has my bone density decreased??? Blood tests show I have an adequate amount of calcium and my thyroid gland is normal. Furthermore, I have always obtained sufficient amounts of calcium in the past as well as been quite physically active. Hmmmmmmmm.....

Uni-girl
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
783 Posts
Discussion Starter · #7 ·
nemesis said:
What was your level of activity like leading up to your hike in 2000 versus the recent events?
Hi Nemesis,

Thanks for caring. Well, I too have asked myself this question. I would have to say there was no significant difference in the levels of my activities prior to the 2000 hike and the more recent bone fractures.

-Uni-girl
 
1 - 7 of 7 Posts
Top