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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I'm interested to see what everyone reads here..Here are some of my favorites

Stephen King-The stand, needful things, bag of bones, the long walk, skeleton crew, everythings eventual

Richard Matheson-I am legend, Hell house, what dreams may come

John Steinbeck-Of mice and men, tortilla flat, the moon is down, cannery row

Just about anything by Ray Bradbury or Kurt Vonnegut
 

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Oh, a thread of favourite books! Here are some of mine:

Sue Harrison's Ivory Carver Trilogy

Mother Earth, Father Sky
My Sister the Moon
Brother Wind


Sue Harrison's Storyteller Trilogy

Song of the River
Cry of the Wind
Call Down the Stars


http://www.sueharrison.com/

Bj?rn Kurt?n

Dance of the Tiger
- original version in Swedish: Den svarta tigern
Mammutens r?dare
- sorry, it seems there is no English version available, you have to learn Swedish or Finnish 8)

You'll guess I'm quite a fan of well-written prehistoric fiction... You may not know that B. Kurt?n was Finnish professor of paleontology, so his books are full of factual details of nature in Neanderthal people's times. The tale of his two novels is also brilliant - full of mythology and believable characters.

I also like science fiction that describes the near future, so naturally I am fan of William Gibson's novels:

William Gibson's two novel trilogies

Neuromancer
Count Zero
Mona Lisa Overdrive

Virtual Light
Idoru
All Tomorrow's Parties


http://www.williamgibsonbooks.com/

Although in my opinion W. Gibson sometimes goes too much into unbelievable cybertech paraphernalia and culture, I like his writing style with many different by-plots, which are linked all together in the end of the novel. Also the atmosphere in his novels is thrilling, so if you are into near future science fiction and haven't read any Gibson yet, it's worth to try.

At the moment I am reading deceased Finnish writer Kalle P??talo's novel series Juuret Iijoen t?rm?ss? (my free translation: The Roots in the bank of the River Iijoki), which describes the writer's whole life from his childhood to late 50's. It is fascinating to read this series, because I learn so much of lost Finnish culture - e.g. logging in Finland's past - while also having a good time reading. The Iijoki series includes 26 different brick-size novels, from 1920's to the late 1950's. Unfortunately you have to learn Finnish, if you'd like to read P??talo's works (although some of his books are published in Swedish too). :)

http://www.taivalkoski.fi/paatalo-insti ... glish2.htm
 

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if you want to read about mental illness and recovery these are the two books to read for encouragement
 

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My all-time favorite is Michael Crichton. I also enjoy Huxley and Vonnegut. Joseph Heller's Catch-22 was interesting too.

:roll:
 

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It has always been interesting to me that three of my favorite books, written in three languages and at about the same time, were all about adultery.

In America, The Scarlett Letter (1850). In France, Madame Bovary, (1856) and in Russia, Anna Karenena. (1873)
 

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Alexandre Dumas-The Count of Monte Cristo
Oscar Wilde-The Picture of Dorian Grey
ATLAS SHRUGGED! (kidding)
I like Farenheit 451 too...
I don't know...I don't read much..never have read voraciously maybe as a little kid, but who knows. I like comic books and magazines for my feeble little mind!
 

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Reading is my favourite passion in life...perhaps my only tangible one, especially at the moment. I've lost nearly all my possessions over the years, except my books...which are like children to me ! Sad eh ! I even know exactly how many I've got....322. Even sadder.

Incidently, before I start, can I just stare evily at Ms DaBoyz, who some time back made me read 'Villette' by one of the Bronte Sisters. :x I know I agreed to it, but I'd rather cut off my head and stitch it back up with barbed wire than read another Bronte book. Pride and Prejudice, Wuthering Heights, the whole lot....is................... :oops: And despite being fairly well read, I'm going to be extremely un-trendy and say that I'm also loathe to read anything by Dickens, George Elliot, and the like. Even F.Scott Fitzsgerald..The Great Gatsby ? Eek. .Sorry. Bleak House....jesus....you can read a book by it's cover in that case. It's terribly popular to pretend to enjoy reading 'classics', when most of it - unless you are a student of such literature, is pretensious rubbish, in my opinion of course...it's a matter of taste. I've read them....god....I've read them. :cry: The only real 'classical' literature I've really enjoyed is Dostoyevsky...especially Crime and Punishment and The House of the Dead. I refuse (goddamit!) to read War and Peace, anything by James Joyce or Le Miserable....or Lez as I call it.

Anyway I can definately identify my 'favourite' two books. The Exorcist (forget the film), and Weave World, by Clive Barker. A soaring, staggering feat of imagination. In fact, most Clive Barker books are up there...especially his collection of short-stories. Incredible stuff. Next up is probably 'The Dice Man', by Luke Reinhart. Also, anything by Poppy Brite is fine by me.

As for the books that we all should like (as we're told) and read to pretend we're clever, I do love Steinbeck, especially (some mentioned them) Tortilla Flat and Cannery Row...no so much The Grapes of Wrath, The Red Pony or the Pearl. Still coll though. To Kill A Mockingbird......Harper Lee ?..yep...good stuff. Most Hemmingway stuff (except The Old Man and the Sea) is a bit of a chore for me though, as is anything by Camus...although I agree with his 'philosophy of the absurd'. Catch 22 was good, but perhaps a little too long.

Other stuff I've enjoyed immensely....The Heart of the Matter, Captain Correlis' Manodlin, oh shit - I nearly forgot, ANYTHING by Jose Saramanga...especially 'Blindness'.....genius. The recent Phillip Pullman trilogy was good too. The Harry Potter stuff, although easy reading, left me cold. A distinct 'lack' of imagination methinks, perhaps, just a little. Hitchhickers guide....hysterical. The Decameron by...er....Bocatchio ? The Leopard by some Italian baron who's name escapes me too, Guiseppe De Lapadusa or something, is great too. Most Capote stuff has disappointed me..especially Breakfast at Tiffanys. Maybe I was expecting too much. Heart of Darkness by Conrad didn't do it for me either, strangely, along with The Catcher in the Rye. Hmmm. Most Orwell stuff....good read, oh and Edgar Allan Poe - great stuff. Incidently, you should read 'The Man of the Crowd' by Poe...there are some real similarities between the tale and DP.

Anyway, they are the ones that come to mind. I'll probably kick myself later when I think about it.
 

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Hunter S. Thompson -anything-
-noone now does what he did then...sad-

The Dark Tower - if you like stephen king its this and The Stand-

The Death Gate Cycle- weis and hickman if you like fantasy/sci-fi-

The Worthing Saga - Orson Scott Card -
 

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Hunter S. Thompson -anything-
-noone now does what he did then...sad-

The Dark Tower - if you like stephen king its this and The Stand-

The Death Gate Cycle- weis and hickman if you like fantasy/sci-fi-

The Worthing Saga - Orson Scott Card -
 

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martin have you read the idiot: dostoyevsky. bit of a fan. 2 good recent reads: indepentent people by halldor laxness
vernon (god)little DBC Pierre
if you're in the uk some oxfam shops are selling excess classics at 99p, picked up silas marner by george elliot recently
 

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martin have you read the idiot: dostoyevsky. bit of a fan. 2 good recent reads: indepentent people by halldor laxness
vernon (god)little DBC Pierre
if you're in the uk some oxfam shops are selling excess classics at 99p, picked up silas marner by george elliot recently
 
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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
I recently read Slaughterhouse Five by Kurt Vonnegut. Great novel.
Also I liked The Catcher In The Rye by J.D. salinger.
 
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Discussion Starter · #15 ·
I recently read Slaughterhouse Five by Kurt Vonnegut. Great novel.
Also I liked The Catcher In The Rye by J.D. salinger.
 

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Since I haven't been drinking alcohol this weekend (pat on back).... I have switched to coffee. I find it helps me read better but if I drink too much I start to get panicky. But anyways I read "Mommie Dearest" last night, it was pretty interesting. And tonight I'm going to start "Sybil". I have a collection of books about people with psychological problems, I really get into them.
 

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Since I haven't been drinking alcohol this weekend (pat on back).... I have switched to coffee. I find it helps me read better but if I drink too much I start to get panicky. But anyways I read "Mommie Dearest" last night, it was pretty interesting. And tonight I'm going to start "Sybil". I have a collection of books about people with psychological problems, I really get into them.
 
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Discussion Starter · #20 ·
Hermann Hesse, Franz Kafka, Dostoyevsky, Camus, Vonnegut, Pynchon

Greatest book of all time - Camus' "The Stranger"

Currently reading Jon Stewart's "America"
 
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