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So many people are wondering what is causing their strange feelings of DP/DR and I can tell you now that the condition is born out of anxiety and you can never have DP/DR without anxiety but you can have anxiety without the DP/DR.

In the UK, not far from where I live in London, there is a DP/DR research clinic. I believe it to be one of the only ones in the country.

They informed me that they focus on eliminating the anxiety before there think of going down any other route.

I have to tell you that you WON'T always be this way, you WILL get better and when you do, you will go back to a life as before and you will forget what it was even like to have DP/DR.

If you are going through hell...........keep going!
 

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So many people are wondering what is causing their strange feelings of DP/DR and I can tell you now that the condition is born out of anxiety and you can never have DP/DR without anxiety but you can have anxiety without the DP/DR.

In the UK, not far from where I live in London, there is a DP/DR research clinic. I believe it to be one of the only ones in the country.

They informed me that they focus on eliminating the anxiety before there think of going down any other route.

I have to tell you that you WON'T always be this way, you WILL get better and when you do, you will go back to a life as before and you will forget what it was even like to have DP/DR.

If you are going through hell...........keep going!
Why would they say they treat anxiety before going any other route if according to you there is no other route at all? It seems you are contradicting yourself. Elaine Hunter herself (who directed that clinic you are talking about) says in one of her books that a person can keep experiencing DPDR even after their panic attacks have been treated and have stopped, and this is what is called DPDR disorder. There are many scientific articles about primary DPDR written by professional researchers.
"I can tell you now that the condition is born out of anxiety and you can never have DP/DR without anxiety ". What are your credentials to say that? Your own experience of your own unique DPDR?
"I have to tell you that you WON'T always be this way". How do you know? Did god come to tell you directly? Or maybe you are his son? Please don't pretend you know better than others, especially without any argument, we are all equal.
 

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Why would they say they treat anxiety before going any other route if according to you there is no other route at all? It seems you are contradicting yourself. Elaine Hunter herself (who directed that clinic you are talking about) says in one of her books that a person can keep experiencing DPDR even after their panic attacks have been treated and have stopped, and this is what is called DPDR disorder. There are many scientific articles about primary DPDR written by professional researchers.
"I can tell you now that the condition is born out of anxiety and you can never have DP/DR without anxiety ". What are your credentials to say that? Your own experience of your own unique DPDR?
"I have to tell you that you WON'T always be this way". How do you know? Did god come to tell you directly? Or maybe you are his son? Please don't pretend you know better than others, especially without any argument, we are all equal.
Wow. You’re so annoying, not everybody is going to agree with your outlook on depersonalization. As per your opinion, you are greatly outnumbered. You’re making complexities in your argument about the checkable “evidence” of something, like you want to see it on paper. Many of us have seen our anxiety correspond with DP. Take your ramblings elsewhere
 

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Wow. You’re so annoying, not everybody is going to agree with your outlook on depersonalization. As per your opinion, you are greatly outnumbered. You’re making complexities in your argument about the checkable “evidence” of something, like you want to see it on paper. Many of us have seen our anxiety correspond with DP. Take your ramblings elsewhere
You still have a problem with the same logic concept, that's very weird. Here is another example (without birds):

Font Electric blue Art Circle Gas

Imagine someone says "There is NO red part on this chart". In this specific example I think it's wrong, do you agree with me? So I start talking about a specialist of charts who specifically talked about studying that red part. But then you jump in a say that "A lot of people reported seing the blue part". Yes I agree with this. But do you understand that it is irrelevant? Because we are talking about the existence of the red part, not the blue part.
But you can say "most people are probably from the blue part, because we see people from the blue part more often". This I agree with. You can also say "since most people are from the blue part, I am going to ignore the red part for simplicity now". But you cannot say "the red part does not exist and if you think you are from the red part you are wrong". It's two different things.

Here is an exerpt from that book (on page 45):

"I have been told by clinicians that DPAFU (dpdr) is just anxiety or just a symptom of another mental health condition - is this true?
Although DPAFU is often closely linked with anxiety and other mental health conditions, such as depression, it is a discrete phenomenon and can occur independently of other problems. The diagnosis of depersonalisation/derealisation disorder has existed for a long time and indicates that, in psychiatric terms, this is a separate condition. Other problems may still co-exist at the same time; just as it is entirely possible to have two physical health conditions at the same time (a headache and a broken angle, for example), it is also possible to have two mental health conditions simultaneously. One of the skills of a clinician is to be able to distinguish different problems from each other to guide effective treatment."


Maybe you can find other researchers who would argue the opposite, but I don't see why a random person on this forum could pretend the debate is over and explain it to everyone without anything more than their own personal observation.
 

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You still have a problem with the same logic concept, that's very weird. Here is another example (without birds):

View attachment 4836
Imagine someone says "There is NO red part on this chart". In this specific example I think it's wrong, do you agree with me? So I start talking about a specialist of charts who specifically talked about studying that red part. But then you jump in a say that "A lot of people reported seing the blue part". Yes I agree with this. But do you understand that it is irrelevant? Because we are talking about the existence of the red part, not the blue part.
But you can say "most people are probably from the blue part, because we see people from the blue part more often". This I agree with. You can also say "since most people are from the blue part, I am going to ignore the red part for simplicity now". But you cannot say "the red part does not exist and if you think you are from the red part you are wrong". It's two different things.

Here is an exerpt from that book (on page 45):

"I have been told by clinicians that DPAFU (dpdr) is just anxiety or just a symptom of another mental health condition - is this true?
Although DPAFU is often closely linked with anxiety and other mental health conditions, such as depression, it is a discrete phenomenon and can occur independently of other problems. The diagnosis of depersonalisation/derealisation disorder has existed for a long time and indicates that, in psychiatric terms, this is a separate condition. Other problems may still co-exist at the same time; just as it is entirely possible to have two physical health conditions at the same time (a headache and a broken angle, for example), it is also possible to have two mental health conditions simultaneously. One of the skills of a clinician is to be able to distinguish different problems from each other to guide effective treatment."


Maybe you can find other researchers who would argue the opposite, but I don't see why a random person on this forum could pretend the debate is over and explain it to everyone without anything more than their own personal observation.
the problem here is maybe, i myself got dpdr due to anxiety. an almost fatal fear of going schizophrenic. 5-6 months long pure O. then i took meds or did other things to come over the anxiety, but the anxiety is at the moment just masked from the zoloft. and due to taking it for more than 1 years i dont know how i should handle it because i know very well if i taper off the fuckloft i will get all the anxiety and pure o back. so the question is, did my anxiety gone (i know, it didnt. every humanbeing MUST have anxiety) and i have the primary disorder? or did i just mask my anxiety with shitmeds and maybe made everything worse for my dpdr outcomes?
 

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the problem here is maybe, i myself got dpdr due to anxiety. an almost fatal fear of going schizophrenic. 5-6 months long pure O. then i took meds or did other things to come over the anxiety, but the anxiety is at the moment just masked from the zoloft. and due to taking it for more than 1 years i dont know how i should handle it because i know very well if i taper off the fuckloft i will get all the anxiety and pure o back. so the question is, did my anxiety gone (i know, it didnt. every humanbeing MUST have anxiety) and i have the primary disorder? or did i just mask my anxiety with shitmeds and maybe made everything worse for my dpdr outcomes?
Wow that sucks... I don't have that book with me at the moment now, but she does also talk about the fact that sometimes anxiety can be masked, and in her case she talks about DPDR masking the anxiety. I have zero knowledge about how anti-depressants should work both on anxiety or DPDR, or if it can be said that anti-depressants can mask or solve anxiety problems. So I am in no place to make any conclusion. When I did take Zoloft it did make my DPDR go away completely quite quickly, and the feedback from my then psychiatrist was that "this makes sense because DPDR is usually caused by anxiety and anti-depressants reduce anxiety". So she did not mention masking in this case, but she also did not explain why Zoloft gave me hallucinations, or why I had withdrawal after only 4 days of treatment. But people are so different. Then I tried other anti-depressants which gave me no effect.
In my case I see that my DPDR stays the same whatever my anxiety level. I have had times where I was happy, functionning at work without anxiety or procrastination, just focusing on my stuff, and ten years ago I have had times with anxiety so strong that my then girlfriend could count my heartbeats through the mattress, and my digestion and immune system had shut down and I was shaking all the time, now this year I have felt quite serene compared to that. But still, except for some recent developments my DPDR was the same throughout all this period, for those ten years. When I felt almost like I was dying of anxiety ten years ago my DPDR wasn't even slightly stronger, just the same as always, quite close to what it is now. So for sure I have an anxious temperament and it is possible it is related to DPDR, but so far treating my anxiety did not help me. What is helping me so far is to put myself at the center of my life and my life choices in some way. Minding too much about what other people think, letting their look on me decide for me (kind of), or not respecting my own "boundaries" means for me that I am not inhabitting my life, on some kind of gut level, not just theoretically. In my case perhaps this state of mind alone could eventually have caused me to feel detached from reality, but this state of mind can also easily cause anxiety because it's very anxiety triggering to live according to other people's look on you. However dealing with my anxiety doesn't necessarily mean that I changed this state of mind. But that's very hypothetical, and it's not as easy as just saying it.
 

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Wow that sucks... I don't have that book with me at the moment now, but she does also talk about the fact that sometimes anxiety can be masked, and in her case she talks about DPDR masking the anxiety. I have zero knowledge about how anti-depressants should work both on anxiety or DPDR, or if it can be said that anti-depressants can mask or solve anxiety problems. So I am in no place to make any conclusion. When I did take Zoloft it did make my DPDR go away completely quite quickly, and the feedback from my then psychiatrist was that "this makes sense because DPDR is usually caused by anxiety and anti-depressants reduce anxiety". So she did not mention masking in this case, but she also did not explain why Zoloft gave me hallucinations, or why I had withdrawal after only 4 days of treatment. But people are so different. Then I tried other anti-depressants which gave me no effect.
In my case I see that my DPDR stays the same whatever my anxiety level. I have had times where I was happy, functionning at work without anxiety or procrastination, just focusing on my stuff, and ten years ago I have had times with anxiety so strong that my then girlfriend could count my heartbeats through the mattress, and my digestion and immune system had shut down and I was shaking all the time, now this year I have felt quite serene compared to that. But still, except for some recent developments my DPDR was the same throughout all this period, for those ten years. When I felt almost like I was dying of anxiety ten years ago my DPDR wasn't even slightly stronger, just the same as always, quite close to what it is now. So for sure I have an anxious temperament and it is possible it is related to DPDR, but so far treating my anxiety did not help me. What is helping me so far is to put myself at the center of my life and my life choices in some way. Minding too much about what other people think, letting their look on me decide for me (kind of), or not respecting my own "boundaries" means for me that I am not inhabitting my life, on some kind of gut level, not just theoretically. In my case perhaps this state of mind alone could eventually have caused me to feel detached from reality, but this state of mind can also easily cause anxiety because it's very anxiety triggering to live according to other people's look on you. However dealing with my anxiety doesn't necessarily mean that I changed this state of mind. But that's very hypothetical, and it's not as easy as just saying it.
Trith, a thought for you and possibly leminaseri to ponder for a while. I quote you saying "I have had times where I was happy, functioning at work without anxiety or procrastination, just focusing on my stuff". I think diagnosing those good days and completely picking them a part step by step and figuring out exactly what went right and why you felt that way so that you can induce more time in that state would help you to feel like that more often, in turn lessening your symptoms. One positive day isn't enough for the switch to flip, I think maintaining that positivity for a long duration which I know is difficult is a major piece to be considered. Forgive me I'm really trying to make sense on here but I have never really spoken without prompts to speak (being in a face to face discussion where I know an immediate answer is required) so I often feel I come to a loss of words quite easily when typing and trying to type my thoughts out. I feel like I'm missing so much in what I just said but I hope you get the just of what I'm trying to say.

For example: I think in my case I had a strong mind, strong barriers to repel anxiety/depression etc, (just like leminaseri and yourself once did) (we weren't born with DPDR) and it took dozens or maybe even one hundred occurrences of emotional trauma to break that barrier down to the point where my mind was fragile enough for DPDR to set in for the long run. It took time and a lot for my DR to activate and it is sitting there saying "It's going to take more than one day of you feeling like everything is normal now for you to get rid of me" it needs a certain amount of time WHILE FEELING CONSTANTLY GOOD during that time for it to feel that it isn't needed.

We may have forgotten and lost how we normally felt emotionally without DPDR and these "good days" may just be the tip of the iceberg when it comes to feeling good, we need to rediscover those old emotions and feelings while yes, feeling completely numb. We know how hard it is but we also know how strong we've become.

This is food for thought and I hope I never come off as trying to tell you guys to "do this or do that" cause I know we're in unique positions, but I do think we all relate to those "good days" and the sooner we are able to turn those good days into good weeks, months, and years, the sooner we will get back to feeling alive.
 

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Trith, a thought for you and possibly leminaseri to ponder for a while. I quote you saying "I have had times where I was happy, functioning at work without anxiety or procrastination, just focusing on my stuff". I think diagnosing those good days and completely picking them a part step by step and figuring out exactly what went right and why you felt that way so that you can induce more time in that state would help you to feel like that more often, in turn lessening your symptoms. One positive day isn't enough for the switch to flip, I think maintaining that positivity for a long duration which I know is difficult is a major piece to be considered. Forgive me I'm really trying to make sense on here but I have never really spoken without prompts to speak (being in a face to face discussion where I know an immediate answer is required) so I often feel I come to a loss of words quite easily when typing and trying to type my thoughts out. I feel like I'm missing so much in what I just said but I hope you get the just of what I'm trying to say.

For example: I think in my case I had a strong mind, strong barriers to repel anxiety/depression etc, (just like leminaseri and yourself once did) (we weren't born with DPDR) and it took dozens or maybe even one hundred occurrences of emotional trauma to break that barrier down to the point where my mind was fragile enough for DPDR to set in for the long run. It took time and a lot for my DR to activate and it is sitting there saying "It's going to take more than one day of you feeling like everything is normal now for you to get rid of me" it needs a certain amount of time WHILE FEELING CONSTANTLY GOOD during that time for it to feel that it isn't needed.

We may have forgotten and lost how we normally felt emotionally without DPDR and these "good days" may just be the tip of the iceberg when it comes to feeling good, we need to rediscover those old emotions and feelings while yes, feeling completely numb. We know how hard it is but we also know how strong we've become.

This is food for thought and I hope I never come off as trying to tell you guys to "do this or do that" cause I know we're in unique positions, but I do think we all relate to those "good days" and the sooner we are able to turn those good days into good weeks, months, and years, the sooner we will get back to feeling alive.
Well these were just examples. It's not like my life was a continuous nightmare except for one or two weeks here and there. I was just saying that I have been through different states with and without anxiety and my DPDR did not change. But it's also true on the long term. These last three years have been much better for me than how I was continuously ten years ago and still my DPDR was the same. So you can always say that maybe if I had absolutely zero anxiety for a full year things would be different, and if they were not you could still say that maybe I need two years, or more, or maybe something else, you can always say maybe. But so far my anxiety has changed a lot on the short and long term without affecting my DPDR and the simplest explanation is that anxiety itself doesn't affect my DPDR.
Some people are so anxious they can't leave their home, and there are several people here who explain that when they were fed up with this and decided to go out despite the fear and slowly tamed it, then their DPDR faded away. And a lot advise others to do the same. But I have never been anywhere near being afraid to leave my house. I have been kind of afraid of driving a car for a while, and I was afraid of driving with someone sitting next to me, which means it was difficult for me to take lessons. Well I did anyway, then I drove alone, and I got used to it and then I wasn't afraid of it at all anymore. But nothing changed with my DPDR. I did not have any more DPDR when I was driving, solving this problem changed nothing about my DPDR.
 

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I am very interested in the connection between Anxiety and DP/DR. There are smart people on both sides of the argument, so it’s hard to know who is correct.

From my experience, I believe DP/DR is connected to the anxiety issues I’ve struggled with for the last 12 years. I say this because when DP/DR came onto the scene, my panic disorder went away, and DP/DR became the predominant thing. If DP/DR was a separate thing, then wouldn’t I be experiencing them both?

I also think it’s possible my DP/DR is a form of Pure OCD. I’ve seen people on here talk about that, and I tend to think that’s a possible explanation for a lot of sufferers on here. I’m constantly doing “rituals” in my head to see how I react to the thoughts related to DP/DR. Sometimes the rituals result in positive feelings, and other times it creates negative feelings. That’s textbook Pure OCD. I guess it’s possible that my DP/DR and OCD are separate things and are just working in tandem, but I don’t believe that’s the case.

Another reason I think DP/DR is anxiety related is because it behaves the same way as every anxiety issue I’ve ever had. For example, it’s made worse by caffeine. Every anxiety problem I’ve had was always exacerbated by consuming large amounts of caffeine. Another example is that it always gets better at night. All of my different anxiety issues have always been way more manageable at night time. Another example is I will have stints of relief throughout the day. That also happened with the various anxiety problems I’ve had.
 

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Well these were just examples. It's not like my life was a continuous nightmare except for one or two weeks here and there. I was just saying that I have been through different states with and without anxiety and my DPDR did not change. But it's also true on the long term. These last three years have been much better for me than how I was continuously ten years ago and still my DPDR was the same. So you can always say that maybe if I had absolutely zero anxiety for a full year things would be different, and if they were not you could still say that maybe I need two years, or more, or maybe something else, you can always say maybe. But so far my anxiety has changed a lot on the short and long term without affecting my DPDR and the simplest explanation is that anxiety itself doesn't affect my DPDR.
Some people are so anxious they can't leave their home, and there are several people here who explain that when they were fed up with this and decided to go out despite the fear and slowly tamed it, then their DPDR faded away. And a lot advise others to do the same. But I have never been anywhere near being afraid to leave my house. I have been kind of afraid of driving a car for a while, and I was afraid of driving with someone sitting next to me, which means it was difficult for me to take lessons. Well I did anyway, then I drove alone, and I got used to it and then I wasn't afraid of it at all anymore. But nothing changed with my DPDR. I did not have any more DPDR when I was driving, solving this problem changed nothing about my DPDR.
Well these were just examples. It's not like my life was a continuous nightmare except for one or two weeks here and there. I was just saying that I have been through different states with and without anxiety and my DPDR did not change. But it's also true on the long term. These last three years have been much better for me than how I was continuously ten years ago and still my DPDR was the same. So you can always say that maybe if I had absolutely zero anxiety for a full year things would be different, and if they were not you could still say that maybe I need two years, or more, or maybe something else, you can always say maybe. But so far my anxiety has changed a lot on the short and long term without affecting my DPDR and the simplest explanation is that anxiety itself doesn't affect my DPDR.
Some people are so anxious they can't leave their home, and there are several people here who explain that when they were fed up with this and decided to go out despite the fear and slowly tamed it, then their DPDR faded away. And a lot advise others to do the same. But I have never been anywhere near being afraid to leave my house. I have been kind of afraid of driving a car for a while, and I was afraid of driving with someone sitting next to me, which means it was difficult for me to take lessons. Well I did anyway, then I drove alone, and I got used to it and then I wasn't afraid of it at all anymore. But nothing changed with my DPDR. I did not have any more DPDR when I was driving, solving this problem changed nothing about my DPDR.
I encourage you to watch and listen to this, if it brings out any sort of an emotional response maybe it will bring out some fresh insight towards recovery.

I don’t know your story but I know how similar my experience to DPDR is by the way you describe yours… my life has seemed pretty darn good despite being in a constant state of DR for the majority of time, I rarely feel anxious. My issue is more depression I guess, but i’ve recently been trying to figure out if I really am anxious and have just been coping by excessive video game use/masturbation etc. The mental stimulation may be draining my mental to the point where it’s enhancing my DR or even masking the anxiety. Food for thought, not trying to come off as annoying or clingy by double replying on a thread I didn’t even participate in but I don’t think that matters right? Just hoping someone reading will hopefully possibly benefit in some way including yourself of course.
 

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You still have a problem with the same logic concept, that's very weird. Here is another example (without birds):

View attachment 4836
Imagine someone says "There is NO red part on this chart". In this specific example I think it's wrong, do you agree with me? So I start talking about a specialist of charts who specifically talked about studying that red part. But then you jump in a say that "A lot of people reported seing the blue part". Yes I agree with this. But do you understand that it is irrelevant? Because we are talking about the existence of the red part, not the blue part.
But you can say "most people are probably from the blue part, because we see people from the blue part more often". This I agree with. You can also say "since most people are from the blue part, I am going to ignore the red part for simplicity now". But you cannot say "the red part does not exist and if you think you are from the red part you are wrong". It's two different things.

Here is an exerpt from that book (on page 45):

"I have been told by clinicians that DPAFU (dpdr) is just anxiety or just a symptom of another mental health condition - is this true?
Although DPAFU is often closely linked with anxiety and other mental health conditions, such as depression, it is a discrete phenomenon and can occur independently of other problems. The diagnosis of depersonalisation/derealisation disorder has existed for a long time and indicates that, in psychiatric terms, this is a separate condition. Other problems may still co-exist at the same time; just as it is entirely possible to have two physical health conditions at the same time (a headache and a broken angle, for example), it is also possible to have two mental health conditions simultaneously. One of the skills of a clinician is to be able to distinguish different problems from each other to guide effective treatment."


Maybe you can find other researchers who would argue the opposite, but I don't see why a random person on this forum could pretend the debate is over and explain it to everyone without anything more than their own personal observation.
I used to be that guy before. Anxiety is the body's normal response to stressful or stressful situations. It can happen to anyone and it happens all the time. Learning how to cope on your own may help reduce anxiety in a simple and effective way. Moreover, Anxiety occurs when the brain perceives insecurity or insecurity in life. thus creating a response within the body This is to encourage appropriate decision-making in stressful situations. However, excessive anxiety can have a detrimental effect on physical and mental health. This article has compiled a list of ways to deal with anxiety on your own. Here is the solution. (Hospital site) www.sukuvhospital/สล็อต1บาท
 

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I encourage you to watch and listen to this, if it brings out any sort of an emotional response maybe it will bring out some fresh insight towards recovery.

I don’t know your story but I know how similar my experience to DPDR is by the way you describe yours… my life has seemed pretty darn good despite being in a constant state of DR for the majority of time, I rarely feel anxious. My issue is more depression I guess, but i’ve recently been trying to figure out if I really am anxious and have just been coping by excessive video game use/masturbation etc. The mental stimulation may be draining my mental to the point where it’s enhancing my DR or even masking the anxiety. Food for thought, not trying to come off as annoying or clingy by double replying on a thread I didn’t even participate in but I don’t think that matters right? Just hoping someone reading will hopefully possibly benefit in some way including yourself of course.
Definitely I have read that DPDR could be perpetuated or increased by overthinking. But I am not sure this helps if I can't control my thinking any more than I can control my DPDR. And anyway I can be more surrounded with people to have less time to think alone and I have done this many times in my life where I was almost never alone, and it changed nothing. I have done extensive meditation for hours and it did quiet my mind, my mind was more quiet and still I had DPDR. I hope it can help someone else though. I know that a lot of people say they get better just by not thinking about DPDR.

Then this video, really, it's a very basic introduction to addictions. You can find the same information in the very introduction of every book about addiction. I can suggest a good one if you want.
But the guy also adds some pseudo-science about the fact that cancer, multiple sclerosis or rhumatoid arthritis are caused by childhood trauma. This is not how science works. I hope you are aware that this goes completely against what we know today, and if you are not I invite you do search about this topic.
So normally researchers work in different teams, they do experiments and studies, they publish their results, they confrong their results all around the world, and some conclusions start to arise when the evidence starts to be stronger. When the evidence is strong enough then the study starts to be used as a basis for present and future research by most scientists in the world. So it doesn't work with single individuals (first red flag) who pretend they have made a big discovery almost on their own and start to apply it everywhere, and nobody believes them but its because they haven't seen the evidence. The evidence should be published and if no other researcher believes (second red flag) it it's likely that it's because the evidence is bad. It's not religion or philosophy where you would just follow the person with the opinion you are the most attracted to and pretend that if others don't believe it it's because they are not openminded. It's a matter of evidence. Also actual scientists who have evidence for what they show don't need to put their own persona forward like this (third red flag). I googled his name and he even has a website called drgabormate.com . This isn't dramatic in and of itself, but you can google "gabor mate criticism" to see what I mean in general. Renowned researchers are renowned because they managed to convince other researchers with evidence, and if they can't convince other specialists but still try to spread their "discovery" to the general public who don't have the tools to criticize it, and especially if they put their own persona forward, it's generally a very bad sign.

And now it's my advice to you. Science has made a lot of progress around addictions. Really there are probably thousands of people working right now on this topic and producing scientific results and publishing them. Science isn't stuck, and it's not progressing so slowly that we have to start listening to gurus. There is already plenty of things to learn from the consensus, especially in addictions, a lot of people are helped by what we know already. So I think it's better to learn what the consensus is saying first before moving to this kind of thing, all the information people need is likely to be there already.
 

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I used to be that guy before. Anxiety is the body's normal response to stressful or stressful situations. It can happen to anyone and it happens all the time. Learning how to cope on your own may help reduce anxiety in a simple and effective way. Moreover, Anxiety occurs when the brain perceives insecurity or insecurity in life. thus creating a response within the body This is to encourage appropriate decision-making in stressful situations. However, excessive anxiety can have a detrimental effect on physical and mental health. This article has compiled a list of ways to deal with anxiety on your own. Here is the solution. (Hospital site) www.sukuvhospital/สล็อต1บาท
I don't understand what you mean. This is the definition of anxiety, yes.
 

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Definitely I have read that DPDR could be perpetuated or increased by overthinking. But I am not sure this helps if I can't control my thinking any more than I can control my DPDR. And anyway I can be more surrounded with people to have less time to think alone and I have done this many times in my life where I was almost never alone, and it changed nothing. I have done extensive meditation for hours and it did quiet my mind, my mind was more quiet and still I had DPDR. I hope it can help someone else though. I know that a lot of people say they get better just by not thinking about DPDR.

Then this video, really, it's a very basic introduction to addictions. You can find the same information in the very introduction of every book about addiction. I can suggest a good one if you want.
But the guy also adds some pseudo-science about the fact that cancer, multiple sclerosis or rhumatoid arthritis are caused by childhood trauma. This is not how science works. I hope you are aware that this goes completely against what we know today, and if you are not I invite you do search about this topic.
So normally researchers work in different teams, they do experiments and studies, they publish their results, they confrong their results all around the world, and some conclusions start to arise when the evidence starts to be stronger. When the evidence is strong enough then the study starts to be used as a basis for present and future research by most scientists in the world. So it doesn't work with single individuals (first red flag) who pretend they have made a big discovery almost on their own and start to apply it everywhere, and nobody believes them but its because they haven't seen the evidence. The evidence should be published and if no other researcher believes (second red flag) it it's likely that it's because the evidence is bad. It's not religion or philosophy where you would just follow the person with the opinion you are the most attracted to and pretend that if others don't believe it it's because they are not openminded. It's a matter of evidence. Also actual scientists who have evidence for what they show don't need to put their own persona forward like this (third red flag). I googled his name and he even has a website called drgabormate.com . This isn't dramatic in and of itself, but you can google "gabor mate criticism" to see what I mean in general. Renowned researchers are renowned because they managed to convince other researchers with evidence, and if they can't convince other specialists but still try to spread their "discovery" to the general public who don't have the tools to criticize it, and especially if they put their own persona forward, it's generally a very bad sign.

And now it's my advice to you. Science has made a lot of progress around addictions. Really there are probably thousands of people working right now on this topic and producing scientific results and publishing them. Science isn't stuck, and it's not progressing so slowly that we have to start listening to gurus. There is already plenty of things to learn from the consensus, especially in addictions, a lot of people are helped by what we know already. So I think it's better to learn what the consensus is saying first before moving to this kind of thing, all the information people need is likely to be there already.
Well spoken I agree with everything you have said, I should have cited a later part in the video where he spoke of possibly having child hood trauma to travel back to and possibly heal from past damage, because that was my only intent of that portion potentially bringing out some emotions. Your reply has given me a lot of insight I will use it thank you Trith.
 

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So many people are wondering what is causing their strange feelings of DP/DR and I can tell you now that the condition is born out of anxiety and you can never have DP/DR without anxiety but you can have anxiety without the DP/DR.

In the UK, not far from where I live in London, there is a DP/DR research clinic. I believe it to be one of the only ones in the country.

They informed me that they focus on eliminating the anxiety before there think of going down any other route.

I have to tell you that you WON'T always be this way, you WILL get better and when you do, you will go back to a life as before and you will forget what it was even like to have DP/DR.

If you are going through hell...........keep going!
But that doesn’t apply to me.My dr happens from out of nowhere. I can be watching a movie, completely relaxed. Or going for a walk, enjoying the scenery.
 

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In response to OP, I don’t see any reason to conclude that DPDR is always the consequence of anxiety, or that if you continue to experience DPDR it is only because you continue to engage in anxious thinking. Unless, of course, that is how the condition is defined by the professionals, in which case the claim that DPDR is always a product of anxiety is only a tautology.

There are several organic illnesses that are known to result in a chronic DPDR experience, as many on this site have noted. I’m sure in some of those cases the DPDR is not a direct result of the illness, but rather an anxious response due to the illness, but I don’t think it can be ruled out that for many of those people, the DPDR is a direct consequence of the condition, and is not produced or fueled by his mental state.
 

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I started off with OCD, got to a point of recovery with that, took mdma became disassociated, when my DR got really bad my OCD just kind of vanished, after 2 years i started to pull out of DR and mainly experience dp which faded to me recovering after 6 months of what i would call complete recovery at the time i became anxious again and regained OCD 🤷‍♂️🤷‍♂️
 
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