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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I was wondering any of you have TLE and thats whats causing the dr and dp or what! and what do you take to fix this? I recently say that dr and dp can be caused by TLE im going to the doctor tuesday and im pretty sure that is whats causing this crazyness, because i have epilepsy..so yea!!
 

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I don't have TLE, but i have schizophrenia and i know that the dp and dr is just a part of my schiz. I started getting dp and dr when my schiz symptoms got worse back in 2003.

It's interesting, because i've read that TLE can cause symptoms that look like schizophrenia (hallucinations and such) I know that dp and dr is common in schizophrenia, so im not surprised if ithat also goes for TLE. I've also read that schizophrenia and epilepsy may be related.

-becka
 

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What is TLE???
 

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babyphat18 said:
what is scitzsophrenia and how do you knwo you have it?liek what are the symptoms?
the most common symptoms are delusions (false beliefs, like the FBI is controlling your mind) hallucinations such as hearing voices, seeing things , etc. Cognitave disfunction (ex: poor memory, poor concentration) disorganized thoughts/speech. Negative symptoms (these include social withdrawl, lack of motivation / energy, flattened emotions/affect) Catotonic or grossly disorganized behaviors.

I have had all these symptoms to some degree, but mostly i have delusions, auditory and some visual hallucinations, and dp and dr (which is common in schizophrenia, but not in the diagnostic criteria), and negative symptoms.

here is a good, detailed description from http://www.mentalhealth.com (this is a really good website on mental health with lots of information on schizophrenia and other disorders). this is the European description. I think it is a lot better and makes more sense than they American description:

The schizophrenic disorders are characterized in general by fundamental and characteristic distortions of thinking and perception, and by inappropriate or blunted affect. Clear consciousness and intellectual capacity are usually maintained, although certain cognitive deficits may evolve in the course of time. The disturbance involves the most basic functions that give the normal person a feeling of individuality, uniqueness, and self-direction. The most intimate thoughts, feelings, and acts are often felt to be known to or shared by others, and explanatory delusions may develop, to the effect that natural or supernatural forces are at work to influence the afflicted individual's thoughts and actions in ways that are often bizarre. The individual may see himself or herself as the pivot of all that happens. Hallucinations, especially auditory, are common and may comment on the individual's behaviour or thoughts. Perception is frequently disturbed in other ways: colours or sounds may seem unduly vivid or altered in quality, and irrelevant features of ordinary things may appear more important than the whole object or situation. Perplexity is also common early on and frequently leads to a belief that everyday situations possess a special, usually sinister, meaning intended uniquely for the individual. In the characteristic schizophrenic disturbance of thinking, peripheral and irrelevant features of a total concept, which are inhibited in normal directed mental activity, are brought to the fore and utilized in place of those that are relevant and appropriate to the situation. Thus thinking becomes vague, elleptical, and obscure, and its expression in speech sometimes incomprehensible. Breaks and interpolations in the train of thought are frequent, and thoughts may seem to be withdrawn by some outside agency. Mood is characteristically shallow, capricious, or incongruous. Ambivalence and disturbance of volition may appear as inertia, negativism, or stupor. Catatonia may be present. The onset may be acute, with seriously disturbed behaviour, or insidious, with a gradual development of odd ideas and conduct. The course of the disorder shows equally great variation and is by no means inevitably chronic or deteriorating (the course is specified by five-character categories). In a proportion of cases, which may vary in different cultures and populations, the outcome is complete, or nearly complete, recovery. The sexes are approximately equally affected by the onset tends to be later in women.

Although no strictly pathognomonic symptoms can be identified, for practical purposes it is useful to divide the above symptoms into groups that have special importance for the diagnosis and often occur together, such as:

(a) thought echo, thought insertion or withdrawal, and thought broadcasting;
(b) delusions of control, influence, or passivity, clearly referred to body or limb movements or specific thoughts, actions, or sensations; delusional perception;
(c) hallucinatory voices giving a running commentary on the patient's behaviour, or discussing the patient among themselves, or other types of hallucinatory voices coming from some part of the body;
(d) persistent delusions of other kinds that are culturally inappropriate and completely impossible, such as religious or political identity, or superhuman powers and abilities (e.g. being able to control the weather, or being in communication with aliens from another world);
(e) persistent hallucinations in any modality, when accompanied either by fleeting or half-formed delusions without clear affective content, or by persistent over-valued ideas, or when occurring every day for weeks or months on end;
(f) breaks or interpolations in the train of thought, resulting in incoherence or irrelevant speech, or neologisms;
(g) catatonic behaviour, such as excitement, posturing, or waxy flexibility, negativism, mutism, and stupor;
(h) "negative" symptoms such as marked apathy, paucity of speech, and blunting or incongruity of emotional responses, usually resulting in social withdrawal and lowering of social performance; it must be clear that these are not due to depression or to neuroleptic medication;
(i) a significant and consistent change in the overall quality of some aspects of personal behaviour, manifest as loss of interest, aimlessness, idleness, a self-absorbed attitude, and social withdrawal.

Diagnostic Guidelines

The normal requirement for a diagnosis of schizophrenia is that a minimum of one very clear symptom (and usually two or more if less clear-cut) belonging to any one of the groups listed as (a) to (d) above, or symptoms from at least two of the groups referred to as (e) to (h), should have been clearly present for most of the time during a period of 1 month or more. Conditions meeting such symptomatic requirements but of duration less than 1 month (whether treated or not) should be diagnosed in the first instance as acute schizophrenia-like psychotic disorder and are classified as schizophrenia if the sumptoms persist for longer periods.

Viewed retrospectively, it may be clear that a prodromal phase in which symptoms and behaviour, such as loss of interest in work, social activities, and personal appearance and hygiene, together with generalized anxiety and mild degrees of depression and preoccupation, preceded the onset of psychotic symptoms by weeks or even months. Because of the difficulty in timing onset, the 1-month duration criterion applies only to the specific symptoms listed above and not to any prodromal nonpsychotic phase.

The diagnosis of schizophrenia should not be made in the presence of extensive depressive or manic symptoms unless it is clear that schizophrenic symptoms antedated the affective disturbance. If both schizophrenic and affective symptoms develop together and are evenly balanced, the diagnosis of schizoaffective disorder should be made, even if the schizophrenic symptoms by themselves would have justified the diagnosis of schizophrenia. Schizophrenia should not be diagnosed in the presence of overt brain disease or during states of drug intoxication or withdrawal.

-becka
 

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Dear Blackwinded,
I beleive that your prescence on this site is a very good thing. You give hope to many DPers whose worst fears are developing schizophrenia. You seem to be handling your disease with both grace and aplomb....Kudos to you. Stay close to your family, keep up relationships, both freindly and romantic, and stay on your meds. You seem to be one of the most clear-thinking and functional schizophrenics I have run into. I agree with the general description of schizophrenia which you gave, but I also view schizophrenia a little bit differently than the rest of the medical community, or perhaps just the segment which doesnt have access to University studies done on it. I see the general heading of "schizophrenia" as more of a name for a syndrome than a specific disease. When someone has a cold, we can usually look at it and say " Yep, strep throat" or "Yep, rhinovirus". We can give it a specific name, and a specific cause. With schizophrenia, though, I believe that there are probably hundreds of different reasons why a person's brain may begin to malfunction and give them the syndrome ( a constellation of common symptoms) we call schizophrenia. We see identical twins, both with the same genes, and one has schizophrenic symptoms while the other does not. Why is that? I suspect that it has much to do with health problems, lifestyles, and exposures to certain substances. Many of these are things we dont even know to test for yet. Some of them we will learn how to check a person for within the next couple of years. I think that if we could treat that exposure or metabolic problem through treatment or lifestyle changes, their brains would cease to degenerate, cease hallucinating. I was recently diagnosed with porphyria, and it has been noted that about 25 percent of schizophrenics have porphyrins floating in their bloodstreams. It might be worth asking for a porphyria urine and blood test. I am trying to work on a protocol for a study linking disorders of porphyrin metabolism and schizophrenia. Disorders of porphyrin metabolism can occur for many reasons, and could actually explain why more schizophrenics appear in urban areas rather than rural. It seems that a way to touch off porphyria is by being exposed to pollution. One might live a normal life in a low pollution area, but after migrating to a city, psychotic symptoms would begin to appear. That is probably just one of many conditions which eventually cause a person to manifest with schizophrenic symptoms. I think that we should concentrate less on neurotransmitter abnormalities, which are more of a symptom of bodily disease, and look at the body as a whole when the nervous system begins to degenerate. We need to take a step back and look at the larger picture in Western medicine.

Peace
Homeskooled
 
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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
well im not really sure if i feel that way, im not hearing voices or thinkin anything like that! mainly for me its like im always constantly thinkin abotu everything im looking at and wondering if its real or not! but i no its real! so i dont no why im still thinkin these things! i no its all in my head so why cant i stop myself from these thoughts? i think its more of anxiety liek the fear that im gunna not feel like im here i dunt really no..also i used to have epilepsy and i take chlonidine for ticks that i have so i dont have them so that could be related i dont no and i also have a thyroid problem! i might be goign to a neroligist to see whats wrong! i guess i am haunted by fear and im always constanly sayign to myself this is real so stop seeing it like its not! but for me its what i see!! i dont no and i hate the sun to i liek the dark i dunno! i cant wait til winter because i hate summer!
 
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