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I'll try to compose this even though I'm in a very blank state at the moment.

On several occasions I've found a way out through daydreaming. Or through the ability to fantasize. To play.

I know we are told not to think too much. However, certain types of thinking can be a wonderful tool to explore emotions, memories and perception of the world (and yourself). If you master the ability to fantasize - I believe you also master the ability to get out of DPDR. Like when we played when we were kids. When we fantasized about being a certain character in a story, for a moment we were that character. Right? Our perception of ourselves, and the environment around us, adjusted according to it.

The times I've succeeded to fantasize my way out, I've regained my full intelligence, emotions, memories and personality. The key is to embody the fantasy (aka your preferred perception of reality) in real life. The ultimate goal is to manage the actual world - not a daydream. A daydream is simply a safe place to practice.

To start to daydream is hard at first - especially with a fatigued mind that tends to go blank. Remember, the content of the daydream is not important - but rather to regain the ability to do so. I usually start with telling my mind to imagine a color, then a song, then a certain material. To feel the texture of it under my fingers.

After that evolve. Try to remember how a certain emotion feels. Anger. Anticipation. Surprise. Jealousy. Joy. Play with words that matches the emotion. Build a story around it. Remember - the content of the story isn't important. If an intrusive thought comes up - don't feel despair. Try play with it with humor. Give it a funny voice. Reply to it with kind sarcasm and say: "Oh you wanna join? Tag a long then. Come have a cup of tea in my imaginary world. However, I'm gonna continue creating now." After that, add some more characters. Let them interact. Add a good soundtrack. Create a new story of yourself. Of how you'd like to: Be. Act. Feel.

Sooner or later you don't need to actively add things to your story. They'll organically flow. And if your brain has the same tendencies as mine, you'll notice you have a different set of tools in here. In this imaginary world I can feel things I otherwise can not. I have access to intelligence I otherwise have not.

The ultimate goal:

After we mastered building an imaginary story, we need the embody the daydream. To manage real life is what we actually need, not to go off into wonderland. So start to play, like when you were a kid. But now you play the version of yourself you wish to be.

(Or you know, a pirate. Just to practice your playfulness. Once you realize your mind is a tool to embody anything, your options are quite endless)

Hope this helped anyone out there. I really believe the solution out, is actually in. Your mind is an incredible tool if you learn to play with it.

Hugs,

Liv
 

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Can daydreaming be useful?
 
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