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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
With your DPDR do you constantly feel like you're questioning everything about your surroundings/interactions?? For example, thinking that the people you see, objects, things that you do during your day to day, etc are either hallucinations or they didn't really happen?? Been dealing with this a lot lately. Like I'll read everything on this site and I'm not sure if real people are posting or if it's just made up in my head?Also talking and moving your body. Anyone experience yourself questioning how you're doing it? I don't know if this is a common occurence with DPDR. Any one experience this?? Please help.
 

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Yeah, questioning is a big part of this condition. You get that loss of confidence in perception because the perception is dulled and distorted leaving you with anxious thoughts to fill in the gaps.
 

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Yeah, questioning is a big part of this condition. You get that loss of confidence in perception because the perception is dulled and distorted leaving you with anxious thoughts to fill in the gaps.
A different perspective is that those anxious thoughts are the gap between you and recovery. In her clinic, Elaine Hunter treats patients purely through psychological means (sometimes with the help of medication), and many recover. As one recoverer on this site once put it, "[your] feelings are buried under a layer of scar tissue" [link]. It is thought by leading professionals that those obsessive, intrusive and anxious thoughts are the embodiment of that "scar tissue". According to Hunter, letting go of those thoughts and thinking patterns is what recovery is. The mind is one organ that works systematically, the racing thoughts and absurd questions incoming at such a rapid rate are thought to be very closely connected to the core mechanism of this condition.

Sdcisaac, that constant questioning is a very frequent symptom of DPDR. Don't take it for anything more than a symptom, don't let those questions effect you on a substantive level. I recommend you look into "thought suppression" and ironic processing, those who recovered through psychological means talk about those two concepts a lot. The advice that a recovered person would give is to not get anxious by those thoughts, let them be there, and get along with your daily tasks. By not giving those thoughts attention, and concurrently not resisting those thoughts, they will subside. Look into the contents of this website here [link], it has reportedly helped many people recover from DPDR, especially those who have a recent diagnosis, it is thought that the disorder treated at an early stage has a better prognosis.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
A different perspective is that those anxious thoughts are the gap between you and recovery. In her clinic, Elaine Hunter treats patients purely through psychological means (sometimes with the help of medication), and many recover. As one recoverer on this site once put it, "[your] feelings are buried under a layer of scar tissue" [link]. It is thought by leading professionals that those obsessive, intrusive and anxious thoughts are the embodiment of that "scar tissue". According to Hunter, letting go of those thoughts and thinking patterns is what recovery is. The mind is one organ that works systematically, the racing thoughts and absurd questions incoming at such a rapid rate are thought to be very closely connected to the core mechanism of this condition.

Sdcisaac, that constant questioning is a very frequent symptom of DPDR. Don't take it for anything more than a symptom, don't let those questions effect you on a substantive level. I recommend you look into "thought suppression" and ironic processing, those who recovered through psychological means talk about those two concepts a lot. The advice that a recovered person would give is to not get anxious by those thoughts, let them be there, and get along with your daily tasks. By not giving those thoughts attention, and concurrently not resisting those thoughts, they will subside. Look into the contents of this website here [link], it has reportedly helped many people recover from DPDR, especially those who have a recent diagnosis, it is thought that the disorder treated at an early stage has a better prognosis.
 

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Hi all, I’m back. Recognize a few names on this post. Have had a dip and I can say I absolutely relate to this. It’s amazing how our minds and bodies can reflex to these thoughts and feelings as soon as DP hits hard. I can go for periods of time with little DP and think “hey I can totally handle if it comes back, I know better now...” lol apparently not!! It is something I still need to work on. Besides popping a klonopin (I know, not the best way to deal but my panic attacks have lead to hospitalization) I try really hard to stay in the moment even though it’s uncomfortable. Not much help but I do relate. Xx
 

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yes I had this shit too . I had it actually worse ....I thought that my whole life was a lie and that certain memories I had were wrong and just hallucinations

I once didnt find a post of mine in a forum that I created years ago and I freaked out because I thought I didnt actually experience it and that my life was a lie . when I found the post finally I cried lol . I thought for 2 seconds that everything is fine and then it started again immediately and I thought I am losing my fucking mind

honestly in my case it was kinda psychotic and to be honest I came out of it with medication
 

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Psyborg- so happy meds have helped! I know so well that fear of living in a world like that.

I do want you all to know there are ways to heal from this. In some cases it may be meds, but there is other help as well. I am not a doctor and can't promise things, but it is the anxiety/ocd/depression that is what causes the distress, in my opinion. If you can help that it gets better.
 
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