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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I came across this idea, that a mind can't be sick.

Because mind is immaterial and it is part of consciousness and not a physical part of body.

This is why I prefer the term "Brain disorders" as opposed to "Mental illness".

Does anyone else agree to this idea?
 

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"Brain disorder" would imply that there's something wrong with the brain in so-called mental illness, for which there is absolutely no proof. Problematic conduct from a social standpoint doesn't necessitate any underlying brain pathology. It's possible to have negative or unwanted thoughts and tendencies without there being anything wrong with the brain. Being diagnosed with anything (or mostly anything) from the DSM-by means of simplistic questionnaires, without any objective, substantive testing-doesn't mean or prove there's anything wrong with the brain.

So I'd say that calling them "brain disorders" would be severely misleading and biased. Brain disorder implies something like epilepsy or ALS, which are actual, proven medical problems. Calling psychological problems mental illness is infinitely more relevant and accurate than calling them brain disorders. I still wouldn't call them illnesses. I'd rather call them "problematic behaviors and ways of thinking according to certain individuals".
 

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Can a mind be sick?

Not literally, no. The "sick mind" is a metaphor for odd or dysfunctional experiences and behavior. So the question then becomes, what is the source of the problem? If it's due to the brain, then the person has a brain disorder. If not, then they don't.

I also think it's so naive of modern thinking to assume that when a person acts out, or has odd experiences, the problem must be in the brain. There are many other problems (endocrine or hormonal, infectious, etc) that can result in these problems. In fact, of proven organic sources of "mental illness", the problem comes from some place other than the brain more often than not. Of course, this may be because we know more about and have better access to other parts of the body than we do the brain, but it's still worth thinking about do get out of this "mind=brain" mentality that even neuroscientists seem to assume.
 

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I would say the mind is a function of the brain. A fully functional brain equals a fully functional mind.

Healthy brain equals healthy mind.
I don't believe that someone can have symptoms of mental illness without a correlating dysfunction

of the physical brain. I think I am an example of this paradigm.

I was mentally ill for 40 years. I read all the self help books which assumed I was free of physical illness,

and therefore needed to work on my psychology (thought processes). I tried to own my shortcomings and my illness

and assume responsibility for it in hopes that I might be able to assert control over it. 40 years of those efforts failed.

Then I discovered that I had a physical brain problem the whole time! I had significant pathology

in my dominant temporal lobe which was the result of a (difficult to diagnose) epileptic syndrome. I had a hardware problem

that was responsible for my software issues. My brain illness is detectable by Electroencephalogram.

I'm not in the mood to hear about repressed emotions anymore. LOL. Every organ in the body is subject to specific physical illness.

The brain is the largest organ in the human body. It stands to reason it will have proportional physical illness.

That illness can be expressed in symptoms of both physical and mental illness.

I'm not sure the mind is not physical. It exists in the form of chemical and electrical actions.

It has a direct correlation with the physical brain. Similarly, an electromagnet has a direct correlation with the magnetic field

it produces. Without the electromagnet, there is no field. The field is radiated energy with a rest mass of zero. But, it is never

at rest and to fully understand it to the limit at which it can be understood, one must utilize several classical physics theorums

and quantum mechanics. I'm content to say the magnetic field is real, and if you damage the electromagnet....you damage the field.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
From the above posts I understand the term "brain disorders" also isn't correct. Because people might have problems due to things like hormonal changes, lack of nutrition and vitamin deficiency etc.

But the point is still the root of the problem is in the body. These problems in the body creates the tendency for people to have obsessive thoughts or to behave differently than they used to. I think the label "mental illness" is therefore incorrect and misleading.

When someone has behavioral problems and they go to a doctor, the doctor is more likely to diagnose that they have a mental illness.
It would be better if the doctor do additional tests to find the cause of the problem or refer to a different specialist.

Below is from my personal experience.
I was experiencing problems with digestion and I went to see few doctors. They did some tests and found nothing wrong with my stomach. They were good doctors but finally they kind of suggested that my problem might be psychological and perhaps I shouldn't think much about it. I didn't know much about medical practice those days so I kind of believed them. Now I understand that my condition is neurological and not psychological. If the doctors were more informed they should've suggested that I should look into neurology rather than psychology.
 

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I would say the mind is a function of the brain.
My aim of this topic was to philosophize about "the mind".

I believe the mind is part of consciousness and the mind is not part of physical body. I also believe in the buddhist philosophy about life after death. Thinking in those lines I think mind could be some unknown energy of the universe. Buddhist philosophy also mentions about rebirth in different life forms, some without physical bodies.

I was also inspired by the below Ted Talk.

 

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From the above posts I understand the term "brain disorders" also isn't correct. Because people might have problems due to things like hormonal changes, lack of nutrition and vitamin deficiency etc.

But the point is still the root of the problem is in the body. These problems in the body creates the tendency for people to have obsessive thoughts or to behave differently than they used to. I think the label "mental illness" is therefore incorrect and misleading.

When someone has behavioral problems and they go to a doctor, the doctor is more likely to diagnose that they have a mental illness.
It would be better if the doctor do additional tests to find the cause of the problem or refer to a different specialist.

Below is from my personal experience.
I was experiencing problems with digestion and I went to see few doctors. They did some tests and found nothing wrong with my stomach. They were good doctors but finally they kind of suggested that my problem might be psychological and perhaps I shouldn't think much about it. I didn't know much about medical practice those days so I kind of believed them. Now I understand that my condition is neurological and not psychological. If the doctors were more informed they should've suggested that I should look into neurology rather than psychology.
Basically, my view is if you feel wrong or different, physically or "mentally", you go to the doctor. Maybe you get a few tests taken. Either one of two things is true: you either have something wrong with the body, or you don't (although knowing which category you fall into is only as good as our ability to identify such problems). I hate the practice of doctors saying that, if they can't find anything, then it "must" be psychological. Quite frankly, I think that if psychological problems are causing symptoms, the patient is likely to know that that is the source. It would be much better if doctors stuck to performing tests and diagnosing or refraining from diagnosing based on the results of the tests. And if the patient is left undiagnosed, he can then decide to proceed how he sees fit.
 
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