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David Kozin

Member Since 10 Jan 2005
Offline Last Active Dec 09 2013 09:33 PM
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Topics I've Started

CONGRATULATIONS!!! You all are champions of your disorder!

27 April 2010 - 11:56 AM

Dear Community,

As a quick introduction: My name is David Kozin, and I am co-founder and CEO of the currently "restructuring" National Organization for Drug-Induced Disorders and also an employee of the Laboratory of Integrative Psychiatry, McLean Hospital and Department of Psychiatry, Harvard Medical School. Our organization (NODID, not my current position), with the help of Daphne Simeon, M.D. who at that time was the Director of Research in Dissociative Disorders at Mount Sinai School of Medicine, WITH the acknowledged help of dpselfhelp.com and the help of one of your members, Brenna Lerch, BSc.. published two papers on DPD resulting in one of these papers making the cut to be published in the most read journal in the world, the prestigious Journal of Clinical Psychiatry, which can be accessed at the domain www.psychiatrist.com.

I am writing you now, because a publication in Reutens, S., Nielsen, O., & Sachdev, P. (2010). Depersonalization disorder. Current Opinion in Psychiatry, that came out just last month as an electronic publication ahead of print, lists the following purpose of review:

PURPOSE OF REVIEW: There is increasing interest in depersonalization disorder, in part because of the increased community awareness of the condition via the Internet. The disorder may be more prevalent than schizophrenia but is often misdiagnosed; hence, an update is timely. RECENT FINDINGS: Recent research has included characterization of the nosology and phenomenology of the disorder, whereas emerging evidence demonstrates a neurophysiological dampening down in addition to psychological dampening in the face of emotional stimulation. SUMMARY: Greater understanding of the clinical characteristics of this disorder will improve the reliability of diagnosis and aid the development of neurobiological and psychological models for empirical testing. Although response to current treatments has been disappointing, recent research has identified the basis for the development of new pharmacological and psychological treatments.



Additionally, the article cite both of our joint research papers as "Papers of particular interest, published within the period of review" and out of 65 citations these are 2 of 4 papers receiving such an honor to be marked and listed as "special interest". This article explicitly cites that web sites like this, dpselfhelp.com being the largest, impacted the interest in DPD and DR in the clinical community. When citing our research, the article refers to the first paper with the extra note, "This study confirms earlier research demonstrating the hetergeneity of symptoms in DPD, which can inform future nosological work." In other words, it helps other researchers develop tests for diagnosing DPD. This is true, as this paper was cited by the major work by Mula et al. Validity and reliability of the Structured Clinical Interview for Depersonization-Derealization Spectrum (SCI-DER) and also the paper has been cited 7 times, including two textbooks. The newest article is noted as "confirming an earlier study that demonstrates little difference between DPD iniated by illicit drugs and nondrug-induced DPD."

In the spirit of dissimineting knowledge for your use that is more than earned and the reason this article was able to be published (along with the two NODID publications), I am attaching a link to a copy of the article in PDF form for the EXPLICIT use of YOU for ACADEMIC and PERSONAL reasons, and not to be hosted on any web site, copied in any form except for personal use with your doctor. Additionally, I am including both of NODID's studies.

Congratulations DPSELFHELP.COM, you have made a difference. I told you it would take time, but your work and sacrifice has paid off and the movement is growing.

Sincerely,

David Kozin

NOTE: I will set up a link to the articles for you momentarily, but we are setting this up on our server. Interested individuals can e-mail [email protected] Also, this post and contents are not the opinion or representation of any work currently active at the Institution or Lab that I am a member. You can also send a friend request to me from my badge below, and I will be able to supply you with information. Additionally, nodid.org will be set up in a month to begin a new type of community sharing for individuals with drug-induced disorders.


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Reutens, S., Nielsen, O., & Sachdev, P. (2010). Depersonalization disorder. Current Opinion in Psychiatry, doi:10.1097/YCO.0b013e3283387ab4

PURPOSE OF REVIEW: There is increasing interest in depersonalization disorder, in part because of the increased community awareness of the condition via the Internet. The disorder may be more prevalent than schizophrenia but is often misdiagnosed; hence, an update is timely. RECENT FINDINGS: Recent research has included characterization of the nosology and phenomenology of the disorder, whereas emerging evidence demonstrates a neurophysiological dampening down in addition to psychological dampening in the face of emotional stimulation. SUMMARY: Greater understanding of the clinical characteristics of this disorder will improve the reliability of diagnosis and aid the development of neurobiological and psychological models for empirical testing. Although response to current treatments has been disappointing, recent research has identified the basis for the development of new pharmacological and psychological treatments.

Simeon, D., Kozin, D. S., Segal, K., & Lerch, B. (2009). Is depersonalization disorder initiated by illicit drug use any different? a survey of 394 adults. The Journal of Clinical Psychiatry, doi:10.4088/JCP.08m04370
OBJECTIVE: Previous studies have documented that in a substantial minority of individuals with depersonalization disorder, onset is first triggered by illicit drug ingestion. The goal of this study was to systematically compare a large sample of individuals with drug-initiated (D) versus non-drug-initiated (ND) chronic depersonalization. METHOD: We conducted an internet survey of 394 adults endorsing DSM-IV-TR depersonalization and/or derealization symptoms. Sixty-four questions were utilized to inquire about demographic and clinical characteristics, illness course, substance use history, and treatment response. The Cambridge Depersonalization Scale (CDS) was administered. The study was conducted from September 2005 to January 2006. RESULTS: Compared to the ND group (n = 198), the D group (n = 196) included more male and younger individuals. The 2 most common precipitating drugs were cannabis and hallucinogens, followed by ecstasy. The majority of participants had modest use histories prior to onset and never ingested subsequently. The 2 groups endorsed similar illness course, impairment, suicidality, and limited treatment response. The D group showed significantly greater improvement over time than the ND group (P = .002), although the groups did not differ in reported psychotherapy or pharmacotherapy effectiveness. The groups did not differ in CDS total score or on the 4 subscale scores of unreality of self, perceptual alterations, unreality of surroundings, and temporal disintegration. On the numbing subscale of the CDS, the ND group scored higher (P = .009) only prior to controlling for age and gender. CONCLUSION: The study strongly supports a uniform syndrome for chronic depersonalization/derealization regardless of precipitant.

Simeon, D., Kozin, D. S., Segal, K., Lerch, B., Dujour, R., & Giesbrecht, T. (2008). De-constructing depersonalization: further evidence for symptom clusters. Psychiatry Research, 157(1-3), 303-306. doi:10.1016/j.psychres.2007.07.007
Depersonalization disorder is defined in the DSM-IV-TR using a single symptom criterion, which does not do justice to the phenomenological complexity of the disorder. In 394 affected adults, the Cambridge Depersonalization Scale yielded five factors (numbing, unreality of self, perceptual alterations, unreality of surroundings, and temporal disintegration), put forth as symptom criteria for a better diagnosis of depersonalization disorder.

The Final Study is in Print // National Geographic Explorer

16 June 2009 - 05:15 PM

Dear Community,

I am sorry to have missed the private messages, but my e-mail was associated with an old address. I have been busy with a lot of projects, I have some spectacular news. I have two things, and make sure you read both.

PUBLICATION IS FINALLY RELEASED

The final publication with Dr. Simeon, Brenna, and I is finally hitting 35,000 doorsteps and the largest readership of any Psychiatric journal in the world (http://www.psychiatr...ap/08m04370.htm). It was put on http://www.psychiatrist.com last night, and listed as a publication currently available "Ahead of Print", which essentially means that it is available on-line for download this month and then will be in the printed in the paper journal next month. This is a massive, seven page study -- seven pages of single spaced text in this journal is tremendous visibility for DPD to the clinical community around the globe -- and I am giving you a sample of it here in an image.

The article mentions dpselfhelp.com in the acknowledgments, and I am sure this article can help many of you when dealing with your doctor and demonstrating the severity of the disorder and also help with discussing treatments. The article costs money to buy, and it is illegal for me to give it to you. Once the article is published, it is the property of the publisher. However, if I purchase a legal copy for someone on this board or perhaps a member of this board has very good library access and gets a copy, I am not responsible for what happens with it and how it gets out. I just can't be involved (and of course do not recommend anyone doing this) and I can not see it publicly available. I also feel you should NOT have to pay $30 dollars for a .pdf file (and if you were a participant, I could get away with getting you the article). However, if you wanted to buy the print version in the actual Journal of Clinical Psychiatry, then this would be a really nice item to have for the $30 dollars or so when going to see a doctor. Your doctor will know the journal and knows how hard it is to get an article published in it and will take the information as valid. It is the most comprehensive collection of DPD and DR individuals to date and we expect will have impact in the clinical community around the globe.

A LINK TO THE WEB SITE AND ABSTRACT OF THE JOURNAL: http://www.psychiatr...ap/08m04370.htm

The Journal of Clinical Psychiatry continues to be ranked as the most-read and 6th most-cited psychiatric journal in the world (according to the Focus Readership Study, June 2007, and Citation Index, July 2007, respectively). The Journal mails to about 35,184 recipients,* and over 20,000 allied mental health professionals have requested daily receipt of informational e-mails about our journals and Web CME activities.


J Clin Psychiatry: June Epub, July Printing. This is just two pages of 7. This paper contains *all of the results* from the study.

http://www.nodid.org/dp/jcp23.png



National Geographic's show, Explorer (http://channel.natio...series/explorer),is looking for individuals with drug-induced DPD and DR for interviews

A quick update on my latest activities. The HPPD community has been fortunate to receive a very substantial grant. Essentially, $100,000 dollars annually for research. I am spending this summer and fall at Harvard Medical School's McLean Psychiatric Research Hospital. I am working in the Biological Psychiatry Lab, and conducting both my own and taking part in hallucinogen-related research.

A producer from National Geographic's most popular TV series, Explorer, contacted me today. They are shooting a one hour show on "The Science of Hallucinogens". I guess I have moved up in the research food-chain some, and have been asked to be filmed for my expertise regarding hallucinogen-induced disorders. They are looking for a few people with DPD and DR caused from LSD or Mushrooms, and willing to go on camera without filters or adjustments, in front of likely millions of viewers as the show is very popular and this is a hot topic. It would likely be filmed in September or August. It is in Washington, D.C. and unfortunately this is not a paid trip for this participation. However, I am talking to the individual funding the HPPD research to pay for those trips.

I will update more in the very near future.

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Best,

David