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David Kozin

Member Since 10 Jan 2005
Offline Last Active Dec 09 2013 09:33 PM
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#188227 CONGRATULATIONS!!! You all are champions of your disorder!

Posted by David Kozin on 27 April 2010 - 04:59 PM

Take caution in interpreting if DPD from drug versus non-drug does go away more quickly. Think about it this way: The drug experience is usually a single or few events and then they cease. This is in contrast to trauma that is constant, such as persistent abuse or traumatic life experiences that have lasting consequences. Consequently, the drug-induced group is not experiencing or rather RE-Experiencing the trauma -- this is the most likely explanation for the difference.

Links are a few minutes away.

David


#188194 CONGRATULATIONS!!! You all are champions of your disorder!

Posted by David Kozin on 27 April 2010 - 11:56 AM

Dear Community,

As a quick introduction: My name is David Kozin, and I am co-founder and CEO of the currently "restructuring" National Organization for Drug-Induced Disorders and also an employee of the Laboratory of Integrative Psychiatry, McLean Hospital and Department of Psychiatry, Harvard Medical School. Our organization (NODID, not my current position), with the help of Daphne Simeon, M.D. who at that time was the Director of Research in Dissociative Disorders at Mount Sinai School of Medicine, WITH the acknowledged help of dpselfhelp.com and the help of one of your members, Brenna Lerch, BSc.. published two papers on DPD resulting in one of these papers making the cut to be published in the most read journal in the world, the prestigious Journal of Clinical Psychiatry, which can be accessed at the domain www.psychiatrist.com.

I am writing you now, because a publication in Reutens, S., Nielsen, O., & Sachdev, P. (2010). Depersonalization disorder. Current Opinion in Psychiatry, that came out just last month as an electronic publication ahead of print, lists the following purpose of review:

PURPOSE OF REVIEW: There is increasing interest in depersonalization disorder, in part because of the increased community awareness of the condition via the Internet. The disorder may be more prevalent than schizophrenia but is often misdiagnosed; hence, an update is timely. RECENT FINDINGS: Recent research has included characterization of the nosology and phenomenology of the disorder, whereas emerging evidence demonstrates a neurophysiological dampening down in addition to psychological dampening in the face of emotional stimulation. SUMMARY: Greater understanding of the clinical characteristics of this disorder will improve the reliability of diagnosis and aid the development of neurobiological and psychological models for empirical testing. Although response to current treatments has been disappointing, recent research has identified the basis for the development of new pharmacological and psychological treatments.



Additionally, the article cite both of our joint research papers as "Papers of particular interest, published within the period of review" and out of 65 citations these are 2 of 4 papers receiving such an honor to be marked and listed as "special interest". This article explicitly cites that web sites like this, dpselfhelp.com being the largest, impacted the interest in DPD and DR in the clinical community. When citing our research, the article refers to the first paper with the extra note, "This study confirms earlier research demonstrating the hetergeneity of symptoms in DPD, which can inform future nosological work." In other words, it helps other researchers develop tests for diagnosing DPD. This is true, as this paper was cited by the major work by Mula et al. Validity and reliability of the Structured Clinical Interview for Depersonization-Derealization Spectrum (SCI-DER) and also the paper has been cited 7 times, including two textbooks. The newest article is noted as "confirming an earlier study that demonstrates little difference between DPD iniated by illicit drugs and nondrug-induced DPD."

In the spirit of dissimineting knowledge for your use that is more than earned and the reason this article was able to be published (along with the two NODID publications), I am attaching a link to a copy of the article in PDF form for the EXPLICIT use of YOU for ACADEMIC and PERSONAL reasons, and not to be hosted on any web site, copied in any form except for personal use with your doctor. Additionally, I am including both of NODID's studies.

Congratulations DPSELFHELP.COM, you have made a difference. I told you it would take time, but your work and sacrifice has paid off and the movement is growing.

Sincerely,

David Kozin

NOTE: I will set up a link to the articles for you momentarily, but we are setting this up on our server. Interested individuals can e-mail [email protected] Also, this post and contents are not the opinion or representation of any work currently active at the Institution or Lab that I am a member. You can also send a friend request to me from my badge below, and I will be able to supply you with information. Additionally, nodid.org will be set up in a month to begin a new type of community sharing for individuals with drug-induced disorders.


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Reutens, S., Nielsen, O., & Sachdev, P. (2010). Depersonalization disorder. Current Opinion in Psychiatry, doi:10.1097/YCO.0b013e3283387ab4

PURPOSE OF REVIEW: There is increasing interest in depersonalization disorder, in part because of the increased community awareness of the condition via the Internet. The disorder may be more prevalent than schizophrenia but is often misdiagnosed; hence, an update is timely. RECENT FINDINGS: Recent research has included characterization of the nosology and phenomenology of the disorder, whereas emerging evidence demonstrates a neurophysiological dampening down in addition to psychological dampening in the face of emotional stimulation. SUMMARY: Greater understanding of the clinical characteristics of this disorder will improve the reliability of diagnosis and aid the development of neurobiological and psychological models for empirical testing. Although response to current treatments has been disappointing, recent research has identified the basis for the development of new pharmacological and psychological treatments.

Simeon, D., Kozin, D. S., Segal, K., & Lerch, B. (2009). Is depersonalization disorder initiated by illicit drug use any different? a survey of 394 adults. The Journal of Clinical Psychiatry, doi:10.4088/JCP.08m04370
OBJECTIVE: Previous studies have documented that in a substantial minority of individuals with depersonalization disorder, onset is first triggered by illicit drug ingestion. The goal of this study was to systematically compare a large sample of individuals with drug-initiated (D) versus non-drug-initiated (ND) chronic depersonalization. METHOD: We conducted an internet survey of 394 adults endorsing DSM-IV-TR depersonalization and/or derealization symptoms. Sixty-four questions were utilized to inquire about demographic and clinical characteristics, illness course, substance use history, and treatment response. The Cambridge Depersonalization Scale (CDS) was administered. The study was conducted from September 2005 to January 2006. RESULTS: Compared to the ND group (n = 198), the D group (n = 196) included more male and younger individuals. The 2 most common precipitating drugs were cannabis and hallucinogens, followed by ecstasy. The majority of participants had modest use histories prior to onset and never ingested subsequently. The 2 groups endorsed similar illness course, impairment, suicidality, and limited treatment response. The D group showed significantly greater improvement over time than the ND group (P = .002), although the groups did not differ in reported psychotherapy or pharmacotherapy effectiveness. The groups did not differ in CDS total score or on the 4 subscale scores of unreality of self, perceptual alterations, unreality of surroundings, and temporal disintegration. On the numbing subscale of the CDS, the ND group scored higher (P = .009) only prior to controlling for age and gender. CONCLUSION: The study strongly supports a uniform syndrome for chronic depersonalization/derealization regardless of precipitant.

Simeon, D., Kozin, D. S., Segal, K., Lerch, B., Dujour, R., & Giesbrecht, T. (2008). De-constructing depersonalization: further evidence for symptom clusters. Psychiatry Research, 157(1-3), 303-306. doi:10.1016/j.psychres.2007.07.007
Depersonalization disorder is defined in the DSM-IV-TR using a single symptom criterion, which does not do justice to the phenomenological complexity of the disorder. In 394 affected adults, the Cambridge Depersonalization Scale yielded five factors (numbing, unreality of self, perceptual alterations, unreality of surroundings, and temporal disintegration), put forth as symptom criteria for a better diagnosis of depersonalization disorder.