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A question about personality disorders


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#1 Abe89

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Posted 20 March 2020 - 09:54 AM

I was just wondering about this and it keeps bothering me.

 

Do people here think that diagnosing someone with a Personality Disorder is going to be helpful to that person.

I personally feel that it could just make people feel small and limited in their capacity to shape their own life.

 

I was bothered about this because of a unpleasant experience I had with a psychiatrist.

It was the first time I met him and I told him about my DP and the reason why I came to see him.

After talking with me he said I have a "severe personality disorder" and gave me a number to call.

Anyways I didn't call the number or went in again because I didn't feel very compatible with the doctor.

I'm just amazed how it can be said in a very short amount of time like 15min, without any investigation or looking at any facts. 

 

So again my feeling is Personality Disorders are not a good method to treat people with behavioral problems. Alternatively I like to suggest just calling them behavioral problems and using some other names for categorization. And not call them personality disorders.

 

I know some people won't have a problem with these labels, but I"m somewhat autistic and I understand a lot of things literally so if someone says I have a personality disorder it's really hard to wrap my head around that. It's not helpful to me at all.

 

 

Any comments would be appreciated.



#2 Where

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Posted 20 March 2020 - 10:11 AM

I think the concept of personality disorders is okay, but the name can be taken as harsh like you're saying. I wouldn't stop seeing a psychiatrist or following their directions because they used the term. My issue with mental health diagnosis is that they tend to be unempirical, like you also mentioned, not that they're phrased in a way I'm sensitive to. I guess the field felt they had to come up with diagnoses for people whose tendencies are harmful to themselves or others.

#3 forestx5

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Posted 20 March 2020 - 10:13 AM

I agree with you Abe89.  I have contacted my elected state officials to render my opinion that the term "behavioral health" is inappropriate in the context

of state funded public mental health organizations.  It is condescending and stigmatic.  I suffered a rare epileptic syndrome comorbid with recurrent major depression

for 40 years.   I had a host of symptoms associated with major depression, and I never misbehaved.  If it could be said I had eccentricities because of my illness,

I do not believe it would be fair to say I had a "personality disorder".  I'm intelligent, compassionate, and people who know me would be happy to tell  you I am

one of the nicest people they know. My comments to state officials are ignored.  State officials don't provide treatment.  They contract with a state organization 

that negotiates with the state for the provision of those services.  Calling it "behavioral Health" sends the message that if you don't give us the money we

are asking for, our clients are going to misbehave.  (And, you don't want that, now do you?)   

I wouldn't accept a diagnosis from a psychiatrist who has seen me for 15 minutes.  I saw several psychiatrists over a period of 40 years, and none of them 

ever gave me an accurate diagnosis.  I diagnosed myself after finding a case history in a neurological journal that matched my illness in every unique and

odd detail.  You write very intelligently.  I don't doubt that you have the intelligence to evaluate your own personality.  Research "personality disorder"

and decide for yourself if the diagnosis fits.  Good luck!



#4 Where

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Posted 20 March 2020 - 10:18 AM

Forest, I wouldn't recommend Abe diagnose himself. Reading the mental health bible can have a real horoscope effect. On the other hand, many people clearly have some dysfunction and are unable to see it, even when it's spelled out for them.

#5 Abe89

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Posted 20 March 2020 - 11:56 AM

Forest, I wouldn't recommend Abe diagnose himself. Reading the mental health bible can have a real horoscope effect. On the other hand, many people clearly have some dysfunction and are unable to see it, even when it's spelled out for them.

 

Thanks @Where and @Forestx5.
@Forestx5 I know a lot about your story , the stuff you posted here. I even sent you a EEG I took to see if it had irregularities. And you even gave me a answer to that :).
 

@Where Forestx5's comment "I diagnosed myself after finding a ..." meant that after experiencing something for a very long time he found a explanation that's very fitting and then he had it confirmed by further tests by a neurologist.

 

Yeah, of course I'm not going to be my own doctor. I started being aware of my problems since 2005 and I've learned a lot since then. I'm actually more interested in the available treatments rather than a diagnosis. If the treatment sounds good I don't care what they call it. I'm not too sensitive to the term Personality Disorders either.

It's just that doctors take a very one-sided approach and they insist on being always right. That's why I didn't go back to that doctor, he was very one-sided.



#6 Abe89

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Posted 20 March 2020 - 12:09 PM

On the other hand, many people clearly have some dysfunction and are unable to see it, even when it's spelled out for them.

 

That's a good point. I recently heard that it could be considered a symptom of the condition.
If you could just listen to the talk below, it has a real life story as well.

I liked the idea that doctor suggested. Which is instead of telling someone something that you know they can't understand, give them something they can work with.



#7 Where

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Posted 20 March 2020 - 06:19 PM

Wow, that's a great video. I guess people's minds can't be forced to change. I was originally thinking of disorders along the lines of NPD, since you mentioned personality disorders.

#8 forestx5

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Posted 20 March 2020 - 06:59 PM

I don't think Abe is psychotic.  I wouldn't advise someone suffering from a psychotic illness to diagnose themselves.  I always knew I was not psychotic, because I was (unfortunately?) fully aware of my suffering.  For Individuals with psychotic illness or bipolar with

manic episodes, that's not always the case.  Though a friend had a psychotic illness and the pharmacy refilled his prescription with 1mg pills, instead of 10mg pills. (Navane)  After a week, he was wondering how he could saw his furniture

down so it would fit in his truck, because he had to move to the west coast (???).  That's when it dawned on him that something wasn't right.  He had enough insight to recognize his thinking had gone haywire and he saved his furniture with a call to his doctor.

The DSM-5 lists 10 general types of personality disorders, presented in groups of 3 clusters.  If one is paranoid, schizoid, or schizotypal, they may not have reliable Insight into their disorder.  If they are dramatic, erratic, 

anxious or fearful, they just might be able to identify themselves from a lineup of symptoms for their particular disorder.  If one went to a psychiatrist of one's own volition;  there is obviously

some self awareness of psychiatric illness.  A psychiatrist might diagnose me by listening to my symptoms and comparing them to a known list of symptoms in a DSM.

Give me the DSM, and I'll do it for myself and nothing will be  lost in the translation. I know all the big words they use.   lol. Not that I believe diagnosis is actually done in this manner. I suspect most psychiatrists flip a coin and start a patient on either an antidepressant

or an antipsychotic medication.  Then, they adjust from there.  It's similar to how a mortar team works in the military.  One long, - adjust....too short - correct....keep firing until you hit the target...If the medication that finally works is for depression, 

then put that as the diagnosis on the form submitted to insurance.  Or psychotic illness for antipsychotic medication.  I agree with Abe that a diagnosis is only relevant for appropriate treatment (and billing).

https://www.psycholo...ality-disorders






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