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Recovery from DPDR


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#1 Sebastiaan

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Posted 03 February 2020 - 09:39 AM

Dear human beings,

 

 

I am going to try to keep this post as useful and compact as possible because that is exactly what I was looking for when I was looking for a cure.

First of all, I want to say that I feel for all of you out there (still) suffering from DPDR. For me It was hell, I will not describe my symptoms but I can assure you I was so confused I literally didn't know anything anymore for sure. I had both Dp and Dr for 8 months (btw also had a 1 month or so psychosis) So for all of you who also had psychosis, there is hope. To keep it short I will come to what helped me get rid of my symptoms in minutes, which looking back seemed completely unreal and unrealistic. But it somehow did and I hope very dearly that this will work for someone else out there asswel. So what and how: I was searching online(completely historical) for some time now, actually the complete 8 months before I recovered I searched and searched and searched until I in some miraculous way(because I could not make sense out of anything as I said) I went to sit down in my room infront of my desk and asked myself 'What is actually bothering me?'. And it was having no fun at all, for the entirety of 8 months. Investigating further I came across an article which included the following statement(I can't remember exactly what it was but this is what it was about): 'if you cannot have any fun you probably are taking life too seriously. If this is you ask yourself this question: why is it or what is it that is causing you to take life so seriously.' The obvious first answer would be: DPDR, but I thought that it was something more deeply rooted than DPDR, because DPDR was not there your entire life and so DPDR also has a cause. For me, and this is something I think some of you struggle with asswel, it was that I was afraid of not being good enough. This is also called fear of faillure and fear of faillure is caused by something even deeper: perfectionism.

After coming to this conclusion I searched for 'How to cure perfectionism'. And so I found the 5 following statements(it was concluded in a Dutch video on YT(I am Dutch), so for you Dutch people, here is the link https://www.youtube....h?v=2FRQRFzasgo)):

1. perfection does not exist. There will always be mistakes and things will always go wrong.

2. you are not what you do.

3. stop thinking in terms of All of Nothing. Stop thinking that something is either perfect of nothing at all.

4. there is no such thing as wrong/mistakes.

5. live like an optimist. 

After thinking about and relating to this statements I felt an instant relief and everything was back to normal. My thinking, my feelings, no more stress and a sense of contentment. 

I hope this will work for someone out there who is still in what I thought then, the worst of the worst. 

 

 

Kind Regards,

Sebastiaan from the Netherlands

 

 

Btw, sorry. This post is not that short at all.



#2 Aridity

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Posted 03 February 2020 - 11:15 AM

Good for you bro! I am also from The Netherlands. I hope this will help someone.



#3 Chen

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Posted 14 February 2020 - 04:57 PM

Wat fijn te horen! De link doet het alleen niet bij mij. Keep up the good work!

#4 inspiredpoet

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Posted 06 March 2020 - 03:53 AM

I definitely relate to this. I've come to realize I was avoiding/putting off stuff because of perfectionism. In my studies and at work I would be terrified of making mistakes so I wouldn't do it. I was avoiding everything because if I couldn't do it perfectly the fear of mistakes crippled me. Being negatively appraised or corrected was the hardest thing. The only way to overcome it, which I'm trying now, is to just face up to it and try anyway, and not hide from it.






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