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Depersonalization rooted in developmental trauma? Books to read...


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#13 Jason39

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Posted 06 December 2019 - 07:56 PM

28 years ago I has an emotional trauma that resulted in permanent dp and eventually depression and anxiety. However, I think I also have vestibular issues which either took over from that trauma  and cause my dp or just contribute to it, unless that trauma itself caused an inner ear problem.

 

When it first happened I was 12 and not knowing what panic attack and dp was it was so severe that I felt dysesthesia-like pain (electrical feeling) lasting for a long time. I still often experience it. I should have seen a good ENT/Neurologist long time ago. I did see a couple of quacks who put it all to my anxiety.

 

That feeling 9dysethesia) and dp would worsen from cigarette smoking, moving my eyes too far to the sides and especially gets extreme if I smoke weed or let's say if I stimulated inside of my right ear with my finger I would be debiliated and unable to function (would have to lie down all the time) for days due to 100% dp and extreme dysethesia feeling.

 

Lately I even avoid coffee. I found that amphetamines help a bit.



#14 forestx5

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Posted 06 December 2019 - 11:34 PM

Developmental trauma?  Hard to argue with that.  I don't believe one becomes healed from acknowledging it.  I relived my emotional trials many times, to no great benefit.

One cannot go back and undevelope and then develope differently. But you can spend a lot of money at $75 an hour trying. 

But who knows?  I battled it all of  my adult life, and age wasn't making it any easier.  I felt pretty sure I would die by my own hand when I could offer no more resistance.

Then I had ECT.  They don't know why it works, but it is the most efficient treatment for depression related disorders.  So I offer an analogy to the personal computer and

application software.  You are working along in your app, and you get hung up.  Things aren't responding and you've lost control of the program.  What do you do?

Pull the plug and wait a few.  Plug it back in and set the boot strap code in motion.  End the dysfunctional processes and begin processing anew. I feel like that is what happened to

me with ECT. But, if polyvagal theory is your bag, and your medical insurance covers it, and you can afford the co-pays, then have at it.



#15 Billy D.P.

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Posted 10 December 2019 - 04:24 PM

Listened to a really good podcast on this subject recently. Highly recommend for those here as it's a much better summary of the Polyvagal theory than what I attempted in this post: 

 

https://www.therapis...tu110_deb_dana/



#16 Where

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Posted 11 December 2019 - 10:15 PM

abuse in childhood...I had so much taken from me

Abusers make me want to do something to stop them, especially with how many people are willing to normalize abuse and protect them from consequences.

From what I've read, stats have shown that DPD is higher in people who suffered emotional abuse in early life. What the studies mean scientifically is up to people's interpretation for now, I guess.

#17 teal

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Posted 23 December 2019 - 09:04 PM

When you manipulate locations in the prefrontal cortex with rTMS the heart rate variability changes. There are trails where depressed are given rTMS while heart rate variability is measured. If there is seen changes they know it is the right location and if not the shift to other locations in the prefrontal cortex. So, there is a "Top-down" from the prefrontal cortex to the body. So, Stephen Porges is wrong. There is also a "bottom up" where the CNS and the body can effect the brain. So, there he is right. Depersonalisation disorder do not come from lower parts of the CNS but the prefrontal cortex the projects to the body. https://www.scienced...935861X19303791

Beautiful, just beautiful!

God, I can't wait to try.

#18 Mayer-Gross

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Posted 27 December 2019 - 11:38 AM

A just published article in "Brain Stimulation" called "A frontal-vagal network theory for Major Depressive Disorder: Implications for optimizing neuromodulation techniques" adresses the interaction between the prefrontal cortex and the central nervous system like the vagus nerve and HRV. 

They show that there is a "top-down" from the prefrontal cortex to the central nervous system in people who suffers from major depression and these changes with rTMS. The claim by the Stephen Porges  that depression and dissociation is a "bottom-up" from the central nervous system to the brain is not true. The prefrontal cortex projects into the body and modulation of the prefrontal cortex in depressed patients with rTMS affects the parasympathetic system and HRV. I think it is the same in depersonalisation. There is likely to be both a "top down" and a "bottom up". 

 

Trauma is not in the body but in the brain that projects it to the body as changes.

 

https://www.brainsti...(19)30413-9/pdf






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