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Does really distracting you from the feelings/thougts from DP cure it?


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#37 eddy1886

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Posted 19 September 2019 - 03:53 PM

"Oh, and toughen up. wink.png Seriously."

 

And im being told my advice is dangerous????????????



#38 Phantasm

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Posted 20 September 2019 - 02:50 AM

I think you were spot on with this comment, Yuri.

 

You are talking about the moment when things start to fall in place. You start to understand and you can take slow steps toward something new. Then it becomes easier. But to get there. To get the insights and the aha moments. To get there can be really tuff and take really long time. Like you said you suffered for three years from DP. The way to move on with your life didn't come to you then and there right? It needed time to develop. Maybe you read some text or watch some clip that made things fall in place? It is the struggle to come to insights that is the hard one. And before that you cant just take someone else words as guidance. Change only comes from inside. You can get inspired from the outside, you can get help from the outside. But true change starts from the inside.

 

 

Btw, I will just remind people that I can place individuals on post approval without warning if they are a frequent source of problems, and I do keep a tally. Always remember the golden rule.



#39 Broken

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Posted 20 September 2019 - 07:47 AM

I think this space is becoming quite toxic tbh, the rudeness to people who come back to share their recoveries, and then people wonder why we don't hear back from some people?

 

I'm open minded to anything and everything causing this, and therefore anything can help. I know it's frustrating to deal with this and how easily others recover, but it could still help someone here, and we don't want to discourage others from returning here with their story. 



#40 fieldsmatt31

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Posted 20 September 2019 - 11:54 AM

I purposefully intended to stir up a small fuss. Because I read some of these things people say, as mentioned in this thread as only one example, and I strongly disagree with what they are saying and how they say it and I wanted to make a point. You can remove me if youd like but what Im saying is true. It sounds harsh but its really not. And I want anyone who is like me and who has been traumatized with 24/7 DP for years to know that it does go away and there are many remedies to help you along.

 

It should be the first thing people see when they visit the forum. Got DP? Don't worry, it goes away. Here's what you can do to help. Here's some stories from people who have recovered. Here's some advice. Here's some video testimonials of people who have recovered. 

 

Instead I see people telling other people, there are no known cures and people only find ways to cope. I see people saying things like that a lot. I see people arguing with other people who are being optimistic about the experience and who are trying to encourage people to improve their self. I see too often people being pessimistic and rude towards people giving advice. 

 

Yes, Yuri is correct in his comment. It took me a long time to build up the courage to leave the DP and to live and move forward as I was with all of the fog, confusion, no sense of self, no identity, fear, crippling anxiety, and depersonalization. I stayed hidden away for years. I dropped out of college, I avoided having a job, and I stayed to myself as much as possible out of fear and as many people do. I could just barely speak but totally could not hold on a conversation with anyone not even my father. I was out of it. My father died and I became homeless for years. I got no pitty or relief from no one and I had to work on myself to build up courage, strength, and perspective as would anyone with or without DP. It was hard. People would be mean. I could barely even speak. It was very humiliating to be such a mess. But I take it in, accept it, work harder, and keep working on myself to improve myself and my ability to navigate through life peacefully and confidently.

 

Honestly, I cant see any better way for someone to transcend the DP experience, or move beyond it, except to accept it, move on, and work on your self. 

 

If I had known that earlier during depersonalization I would have leaped. I would have at least tried to develop the courage to drop it and approach life without all of the identity, negative believes, behaviors, and baggage that comes along with the DP experience. I would have got a job or gone to college or gone on an adventure sooner. I wouldn't have given so much power to the idea that I was "sick". Like I said, I would have went on with my life as one would without the DP because ultimately, thats what one has to do anyways, at any point, if they wish to leave the DP. 

 

And it gets easier. Thats why the advice is there to meditate, exercise, practice healthy eating and living. Because these things make you healthier and stronger and thus easier for you to navigate in your self and in the world as you would without DP. If your intention is true and you are serious about leaving DP it gets easier and easier and one day you will notice DP isnt even there and you no longer even give it any thought. Thats how it happens and not just for me but for everyone who goes through it. They just go on living and it goes away. 

 

And thats exactly what I think people should know. It goes away. 

 

The young gentleman earlier in the thread mentioned that he was suffering with DP for 10 years but at that moment wasn't troubled with DP. That lets me know that he needs to move on then. There are people who are traumatized 24/7 with this and who feel doomed that they have a chronic crippling mental illeness which is not the case. But why was the young gentleman here? To socialize? To argue that DP is unknown? To argue there isnt a remedy? To give people support? To reminisce?

 

I try to encourage people to go on with their life as they would without the DP and to improve their physical and mental health as a remedy to make their self stronger and healthier. It goes away. And they can totally go on to live healthy, happy, and fulfilling lives. But I say this and people want to argue that what im saying is wrong and that I dont know what Im talking about. Because its too hard to just go on living without DP. It is hard. But its not too hard. It goes away.  



#41 fieldsmatt31

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Posted 20 September 2019 - 12:25 PM

https://www.youtube....ery=DP recovery



#42 Sun Yata

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Posted 20 September 2019 - 02:14 PM



^ this is a great conversation, from 9:00-22:00 he describes the practice of transforming your inner pain. 

This is the practice i did daily for many years that transformed the DR symptoms in me. I feel it has the potential to help people here. Cheers

 



#43 PerfectFifth

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Posted 20 September 2019 - 03:53 PM

I think this space is becoming quite toxic tbh, the rudeness to people who come back to share their recoveries, and then people wonder why we don't hear back from some people?

Hmm, I wonder why that is. When you have people saying stuff like "just toughen up, bro!", to people who have had chronic DPDR for more than a decade, it shouldn't come as a surprise when that isn't well received. The problem with these "I have discovered the one and only true cure" people is that they really push it as some universal truth. Like all you've got to do is A and B, and you'll be 100% cured because that's what worked for THEM. It's a failure to appreciate that there may be multiple causes for these symptoms, and thus pushing one approach as the definitive one-size-fits-all, "just forget about DPDR!", cure is unbelievably narrow-minded. 

 

I have no problem at all with people who come to post their recovery stories. More power to them. What I do have a problem with is when someone comes here to push their approach as the ultimate cure as if they actually knew the biological abnormalities that cause DPDR and the mechanism of why this method works. There's a certain arrogance to it. 

 

X worked for you? Great! You've shared your story; you've made a positive contribution. That doesn't mean you should now get intoxicated on your discovery and start rubbing it on everyone's face here on the forums as the True Cure™ and lashing out at anyone who dares challenge your claim. There is the difference between someone reasonable and someone who becomes fanatical about their being cured by some method, to the point that they fail to see that perhaps everyone's case is not exactly like their case. 

 

https://www.dpselfhe...showtopic=95110

 

This is an example of a non-toxic recovery thread. The person isn't trying to push something on others aggressively but just shared his/her own story. But look, even HERE we have fieldsmatt31 using this innocuous, impartial thread as a springboard for pushing his own meditation/yoga/toughen up/self-improvement/etc agenda even though the thread wasn't even asking for any such advice. Hell, it's about someone who RECOVERED, and yet there's a True Cure™ pusher in the thread. So who's the toxic one again? 



#44 REB

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Posted 20 September 2019 - 04:29 PM

Just lift, bro.



#45 PerfectFifth

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Posted 20 September 2019 - 04:46 PM

The key is understanding that the physical world is beyond subjective life, and emotional intelligence unfolds through self-righteous sensations. That is to say, something we all should understand is that information differentiates into boundless acceptance. What is the ego's role in all this? Well, the ego illuminates sub-empirical potentiality. The search for the inner self is the path to fundamental quantum external reality. Ultimately, once the search is complete, perceptual reality imparts reality to total mortality, alleviating the DPDR symptoms significantly. This is what the recovery process is all about, that fundamental reality unfolds into total acceptance of truth, which in turn gradually cures DP.



#46 fieldsmatt31

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Posted 20 September 2019 - 05:59 PM

Broken Fifth,

 

Your last comment seems silly to me. But anyways...

 

I say: LOOK, go on with your life and forget about this DP stuff. It DOES go away. It happened to me and many others. I believe it can happen to you too. 

 

And that makes you mad? 

 

Many people are unsure if they can ever be okay again. It is traumatizing for people, wondering if they have a serious mental disease? NO, they dont. YES, it does away. It goes away naturally. 

 

Im only saying the same thing everyone else who recovers from DP says. GO on with your life, it goes away. 

 

Ive seen it in myself and others that i know personally. And there are so many people even on youtube telling their DP story.

 

I give basic life advice that most people should already know. Improve your physical health, improve you mental health, and you improve your over all state of well being. Use these things as remedies to counter the struggle of DP and to gain perspective and strentgh to help you along your journey and to ultimately forget about DP. And go on with your life as you would without it and it goes away. Eventually, you dont even think about it.

 

No one can tell me thats not true. And you cant tell me DP is caused by "biological abnormalities". Its not.

 

You're not even making sense to me really.

 

You say in a previous comment:

 

"You seem to assume that I'm squirming in anguish from my "DPDR" on a daily basis. This isn't the case. I don't give a damn about it at the moment, for example. I browse this forum like any other forum. I'm not here for consolation or to commiserate."

 

But then you claim to be a decade long DP sufferer. 

 

I dont think you suffer with DP. I think its behind you and you need to let it go already. 

 

But why do you argue that it doesnt go away? 

 

You just want to argue.

 

Like a child.

 

To be honest, I think you just need to grow up.

 

I cant waste anymore time going back and forth with you. Ill let you have the last word. I really just want to tell you to grow up and stop acting like a baby. And toughen up already. You're 27? Big boy now. 

 

Stop holding on to your past suffering. You dont have DP. Let it go already. 



#47 PerfectFifth

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Posted 20 September 2019 - 06:20 PM

"You seem to assume that I'm squirming in anguish from my "DPDR" on a daily basis. This isn't the case. I don't give a damn about it at the moment, for example. I browse this forum like any other forum. I'm not here for consolation or to commiserate."

 

But then you claim to be a decade long DP sufferer. 

 

I dont think you suffer with DP. I think its behind you and you need to let it go already. 

So a cancer sufferer who has accepted his fate that it's terminal, and not going away, doesn't actually have cancer either? If you actually paid some attention, you'd realize that I've been applying your "cure" for years now. I even explicitly told you that. I have accepted DPDR and "moved on", yet the symptoms persist. It seems impossible for you to grasp that point. 

 

Stop holding on to your past suffering. You dont have DP. Let it go already. 

It's great that you know exactly what I have and what I don't have and how I feel. You could make a career out of those clairvoyant abilities. 

 

You just want to argue.

 

Like a child.

No, I don't want to "just argue", but I will surely argue when I see something worth arguing against. "Like a child", really? Now you're trying to condescend me. Great. 



#48 Chip1021

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Posted 20 September 2019 - 06:45 PM

I give basic life advice that most people should already know. Improve your physical health, improve you mental health, and you improve your over all state of well being. Use these things as remedies to counter the struggle of DP and to gain perspective and strentgh to help you along your journey and to ultimately forget about DP. And go on with your life as you would without it and it goes away. Eventually, you dont even think about it.
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This is a perspective that I see a lot on here, and can probably be used to gauge the differences in various people’s “conditions”. What you say implies that DP only exists because the subject is thinking about it. But what is the “it” that we are referring to here?

Many on this forum, at least as far as I can gauge from the content of their posts, appear to be stuck in an OCD cycle. Their experience is not one of a total loss of self or a sense that external reality is distant and vague but they are obsessed with ideas such as whether or not solipsism is true, for example. They can’t seem to just “move on” and except reality as it appears. For such individuals who deal with those issues, I would imagine that moving on with life (whatever that means for them) would deprive them of the obsessions that fuel their symptoms. I would also argue that such individuals are not experiencing DPDR, but rather a form of existential OCD, though that’s certainly debatable.

Others on here, though, have a decidedly different experience. One that is independent of the content of their thoughts, anxieties, or activity level. There are many who do go out and live life like normally, but don’t feel any rewards from doing so, and feel like automatons at work, with friends and family, etc. and still others experience such crippling visual and cognitive issues that they struggle to find the bathroom in their own houses and read or construct a simple sentence. Are they experiencing DPDR? I would say yes, and then some. But for those individuals, either they are “living life”, but the experience is greatly reduced, or they are simply incapable of doing so in their present state. Hence, the presumption of a biological issue (a not unreasonable one, in my view), and a search for a “cure”.

Personally, in my experience, the idea that DPDR exists only because I’m thinking about “it” is nonsensical. It is a way of experiencing the self and the world around me. “It” exists regardless of what my attention is focused on, or what activity I may be engaged in. If your experience differs, it makes sense to conclude that the condition from which I suffer is unique from that from which you suffer(ed).




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