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Does really distracting you from the feelings/thougts from DP cure it?


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#1 yuri

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Posted 15 September 2019 - 12:07 AM

I am just curios. I have chosen the way of learning to accept them and my anxiety. I have always pushed unwanted thoughts and feelings away and for me it is a dead end to distract. But we are all different. It seems paradoxically that distracting and trying to avoid the feelings will cure DP because DP seems to start with a trauma that the brain tries to distance it self from. So I`m just curios if people find it helpful in the long run to distract?



#2 eddy1886

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Posted 15 September 2019 - 12:58 AM

Its a band aid...........But can help when times are really bad.......

 

Nobody knows what the true cure for DP is......We just develop ways to cope with it...



#3 Sun Yata

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Posted 15 September 2019 - 08:07 PM

Diving into and embracing the hurt can transform it into peace.

The hurt can be looked at like Mud and when its embraced with the light of your awareness it can bloom into the lotus. 

 

We are all full of so much potential.
Especially people on this site. 

We need to face these feelings directly, reach into them and not turn away.  

 

I think embodying the mindset that 'I Am exactly who i'm supposed to be"
Is very powerful, transformative and healing.  
 

Forget about DP/DR,  the label should be dropped.  Its not who you are. 
We are what we are, and its much more beauitful, deep and powerful then "DP". 



#4 PerfectFifth

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Posted 15 September 2019 - 11:41 PM

Forget about DP/DR,  the label should be dropped.  Its not who you are. 

We are what we are, and its much more beauitful, deep and powerful then "DP". 

Having a broken leg doesn't make you a broken leg. Having a broken leg still sucks, though, and not identifying as that broken leg doesn't magically fix said leg. 



#5 Sun Yata

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Posted 16 September 2019 - 01:36 AM

Having a broken leg doesn't make you a broken leg. Having a broken leg still sucks, though, and not identifying as that broken leg doesn't magically fix said leg. 

No it dosent magically fix it, but it can be a big part of healing when you stop telling yourself  "I have this or that" or  "this isn't how I should be" and "i'm sick". Those thoughts reinforce the symptoms and become truth.  

 

For me when i flipped that mindset and persistently told myself the opposite "i am exactly who i should be at all times" "this is exactly how I should be feeling" those thoughts manifested into my reality and there was no longer an inner conflict within me.
 



#6 eddy1886

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Posted 16 September 2019 - 02:32 AM

Diving into and embracing the hurt can transform it into peace.

The hurt can be looked at like Mud and when its embraced with the light of your awareness it can bloom into the lotus. 

 

We are all full of so much potential.
Especially people on this site. 

We need to face these feelings directly, reach into them and not turn away.  

 

I think embodying the mindset that 'I Am exactly who i'm supposed to be"
Is very powerful, transformative and healing.  
 

Forget about DP/DR,  the label should be dropped.  Its not who you are. 
We are what we are, and its much more beauitful, deep and powerful then "DP". 

Yup....Thats gonna work alright.....NOT!!!

 

The very heart of DP revolves around the loss of the sense of self and the loss of recognition of your environment. and the loss of regular feelings attached with that environment..

 

Face your feelings???? Half of the people on here have NO feelings and even if they do they are all terrifying.......

Embrace the hurt???? None of us even know what hurt caused this in the first place...

There is no feeling or hurt with DP just sheer terror and confusion and not knowing what to believe in......

 

Please stop pep talking...Thats not a good thing to do for DP sufferers...

 

We want solid answers NOT hocus pocus fantastical suggestions......We are people who doubt...Solid answers and proven treatments are what we want to put our minds at ease.....We are all sick to death of pep talks and guess work..........

 

Oh and BTW...Its literally impossible to forget about DP...In case you havent noticed...



#7 Sun Yata

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Posted 16 September 2019 - 03:24 AM

Yup....Thats gonna work alright.....NOT!!!

 

The very heart of DP revolves around the loss of the sense of self and the loss of recognition of your environment. and the loss of regular feelings attached with that environment..

 

Face your feelings???? Half of the people on here have NO feelings and even if they do they are all terrifying.......

Embrace the hurt???? None of us even know what hurt caused this in the first place...

There is no feeling or hurt with DP just sheer terror and confusion and not knowing what to believe in......

 

Please stop pep talking...Thats not a good thing to do for DP sufferers...

 

We want solid answers NOT hocus pocus fantastical suggestions......We are people who doubt...Solid answers and proven treatments are what we want to put our minds at ease.....We are all sick to death of pep talks and guess work..........

 

Oh and BTW...Its literally impossible to forget about DP...In case you havent noticed

Its not guess work though, I've put in thousands of hours of inner work over the last 5 years and it was a proven treatment for me.  I talked more about what helped me in the Breath Awareness Meditation thread. smile.png

I've lived that struggle to my man, for 20 + years.  i know the pain.  and i've got rid of alot of those symptoms.  If its not your cup of tea its all good, i'm sure theres a method/treatment out there that will suit you better,  I just came back to the forum to shed some light on what helped me. smile.png
cheers

 



#8 Broken

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Posted 16 September 2019 - 07:35 AM

Hi again Sun, I have been trying the breath meditation and it seems to be helping... very early days still but I posted a link about the neurobiology of why it might help in your thread. 

 

I think there is a very distinct difference between early, intermittent DP and the disorder itself DPD which is chronic and actually has changes in neurobiology and brain structures, triggered by trauma and drugs and isn't simple to reverse. Simply forgetting about it and carrying on with your life is easier in those intermittent mild forms where distraction can actually get rid of the anxiety and therefore the symptoms.

 

I think the chronic DPD version actually needs medication or active things that will begin to reverse the brain structures keeping this in place. That makes it sound permanent but I still believe this can be overcome. IMO meditation could help that and has helped people with the chronic DPD version of this triggered my marijuana (Sun Yata above being one of them). 

 

I guess it depends Yuri as to how long you've had this, when it was triggered and if its chronic or intermittent. If it is early, intermittent and caused by anxiety then certainly distracting yourself rather than ruminating on the disorder could help. If its later on ie 6 months or more, triggered by drugs and chronic, then in my experience simply trying to live as normal doesn't work as nothing is changing, And I find I can't exactly lead a normal life with chronic DPD, socialising and working are very very difficult. I do them to my best ability, but I no longer enjoy those aspects of my life



#9 eddy1886

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Posted 16 September 2019 - 11:41 AM

Only the people on here who have experienced chronic incapacitating DP can tell you how literally impossible it is to stop or alter the thinking patterns....

 

Anybody on here who has managed to "Think" their way out of DP has not had it in its chronic debilitating form....

 

The obsessive side to chronic DP is relentless and NO amount of positive thinking makes it go away...If that was the case DP wouldnt be an issue in any of our lives and we could just move along as if it never happened....That is simply not the case with this condition in its true chronic form...

 

Its basically the same as asking a person with schizophrenia to stop listening to the voices they are hearing...

 

I believe what you have actually experienced is your DP eased off with time...Which often happens for a certain group of sufferers...Of course they falsely believe that certain ways of thinking etc got them out of it...Thats just not the case...Not with true chronic incapacitating DP anyway...You CANNOT think your way out of true chronic DP...



#10 Sun Yata

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Posted 16 September 2019 - 12:00 PM

Only the people on here who have experienced chronic incapacitating DP can tell you how literally impossible it is to stop or alter the thinking patterns....

 

Anybody on here who has managed to "Think" their way out of DP has not had it in its chronic debilitating form....

 

The obsessive side to chronic DP is relentless and NO amount of positive thinking makes it go away...If that was the case DP wouldnt be an issue in any of our lives and we could just move along as if it never happened....That is simply not the case with this condition in its true chronic form...

 

Its basically the same as asking a person with schizophrenia to stop listening to the voices they are hearing...

 

I believe what you have actually experienced is your DP eased off with time...Which often happens for a certain group of sufferers...Of course they falsely believe that certain ways of thinking etc got them out of it...Thats just not the case...Not with true chronic incapacitating DP anyway...You CANNOT think your way out of true chronic DP...

I didnt think my way out of it, quite the opposite actually.
But having a positive mindset and positive thoughts did help the healing process along and got rid of a lot of inner conflict.

It was more meditation, yoga, mindfulness/embracing the internal pain energies and the moment that started to heal me. DR symptoms especially.

And yes I was chronic. It wrecked my life.  i spent years in a hospital unable to leave my bed, tried all their meds and even turned to shock therapy at one point out of desperation. 

But anyways i'm once again stepping away from this site as its not good for my health.

I Wish you well dude, i hope that you find the relief you're looking for. 


 



#11 Phantasm

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Posted 17 September 2019 - 05:59 AM

I am just curios. I have chosen the way of learning to accept them and my anxiety. I have always pushed unwanted thoughts and feelings away and for me it is a dead end to distract. But we are all different. It seems paradoxically that distracting and trying to avoid the feelings will cure DP because DP seems to start with a trauma that the brain tries to distance it self from. So I`m just curios if people find it helpful in the long run to distract?

 

Unless you've forgotten all about it, it's very hard to NOT think about something, so I tend to prefer the term thought dismissal to distraction, as this is about dismissing anything relating to symptoms and giving them as little attention and power as you can. So you might think something quick and simple like, "that's nonsense," and turn your attention to something practical and "real world," thereby orientating yourself in actual life. 

 

A similar way is thought substitution, where you immediately replace delusional or destructive thinking with something more constructive, realistic and positive. 

 

Not saying it's easy because it takes time, but as with all these things getting the ball rolling is the hardest part, and it does get easier with practice. Thoughts are habits and the more attention we give the destructive ones the more power they have. Place DP on a pedestal and worship it, and it will be your god, so belittle it, undermine it, give it as little attention as you can, and think of it in any way that makes you feel better and more empowered.

 

For example, some people balk when someone suggests simply telling yourself it's "just anxiety," but leave theoretical debates to the master-debaters and just see if it makes YOU feel better about it by looking at it in a diminished way, as mundane, even boring. If you feel lighter and less overwhelmed then that's all that matters.

 

Sometimes it goes deeper than this and we have to look at why we are tearing ourselves apart in the first place, and behind this can be a destructive core belief that we are flawed, damaged or bad. The more we identify with this idea instead of challenging it, the more we pick ourselves apart with habits like self-checking and brutal self-analysis, but we can use the same substitution technique here too. When we identify with negative thoughts as our own we are in effect sleeping with the enemy, because often they came from other people who were not concerned with what was best for us. Imagine if a bully hit you with a stick for a while, got bored and left, then you picked it up and kept hitting yourself with it for the rest of your life. It's like that.

 

Anyway, hope this helps and gives you some food for thought on potential ways of approaching recovery.     



#12 PerfectFifth

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Posted 17 September 2019 - 08:22 AM

Unless you've forgotten all about it, it's very hard to NOT think about something, so I tend to prefer the term thought dismissal to distraction, as this is about dismissing anything relating to symptoms and giving them as little attention and power as you can. So you might think something quick and simple like, "that's nonsense," and turn your attention to something practical and "real world," thereby orientating yourself in actual life. 

 

A similar way is thought substitution, where you immediately replace delusional or destructive thinking with something more constructive, realistic and positive. 

 

Not saying it's easy because it takes time, but as with all these things getting the ball rolling is the hardest part, and it does get easier with practice. Thoughts are habits and the more attention we give the destructive ones the more power they have. Place DP on a pedestal and worship it, and it will be your god, so belittle it, undermine it, give it as little attention as you can, and think of it in any way that makes you feel better and more empowered.

 

For example, some people balk when someone suggests simply telling yourself it's "just anxiety," but leave theoretical debates to the master-debaters and just see if it makes YOU feel better about it by looking at it in a diminished way, as mundane, even boring. If you feel lighter and less overwhelmed then that's all that matters.

 

Sometimes it goes deeper than this and we have to look at why we are tearing ourselves apart in the first place, and behind this can be a destructive core belief that we are flawed, damaged or bad. The more we identify with this idea instead of challenging it, the more we pick ourselves apart with habits like self-checking and brutal self-analysis, but we can use the same substitution technique here too. When we identify with negative thoughts as our own we are in effect sleeping with the enemy, because often they came from other people who were not concerned with what was best for us. Imagine if a bully hit you with a stick for a while, got bored and left, then you picked it up and kept hitting yourself with it for the rest of your life. It's like that.

 

Anyway, hope this helps and gives you some food for thought on potential ways of approaching recovery.     

Yeah, strategies like this can no doubt be helpful.

 

Not really DP-related, but I used to be envious of others. I fixed this by realizing that it makes more sense to compare myself to a past version of myself rather than comparing myself to others. This way, I focus on my own progress and what I am rather than on what I'm not. 






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