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Anti-inflammatory drugs


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#1 Jackk11

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Posted 01 May 2019 - 10:28 AM

Inflammation in the brain is associated with anhedonia, slow cognitive abilities, and even repeating lyrics and having songs stuck in your head. I have pretty much all of those symptoms, and I’ve read at least one anecdotal piece of evidence that stated he began thinking normally and feeling again when he took a drug called prednisone (wouldn’t recommend this drug specifically it has nasty side effects). Any other ideas?

#2 Broken

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Posted 01 May 2019 - 02:39 PM

Duno, inflammation is related to depression and many illnesses. As is the gut health and many other things. If you do think of taking these drugs long term they can have bad effects. I know NSAIDs (non steroidal anti inflammatory drugs(?)) give you stomach ulcers if taken for too long or even after a short period if you take them without food.

 

Apparently hemp seed oil is good for inflammation, I would recommend trying to go the natural root long term, but maybe try something like ibuprofen for a day or two and see what happens? Not too much harm if you take it with food. I wouldn't expect much. I tried the same with paracetamol as it affects the endocannabinoid system (supposedly) which is kind or related to weed causing this for some people. Didn't do much though. I may try ibuprofen for a couple of days myself, these drugs have never done much for me though



#3 Jackk11

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Posted 01 May 2019 - 02:56 PM

I feel ibuprofen might be too weak of a drug. But it’s worth shot trialing it for a short while. Just spitballing ideas, because I’m not too familiar with pharmaceuticals.

#4 davinizi

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Posted 02 May 2019 - 06:42 AM

Inflammation in the brain is associated with anhedonia, slow cognitive abilities, and even repeating lyrics and having songs stuck in your head. I have pretty much all of those symptoms, and I’ve read at least one anecdotal piece of evidence that stated he began thinking normally and feeling again when he took a drug called prednisone (wouldn’t recommend this drug specifically it has nasty side effects). Any other ideas?

 

 

Yes I have another idea:

 

Try the ketogenic diet!  

 

The ketogenic diet specifically impacts  mechanisms responsible for chronic inflammation. When you start burning fat instead of sugar, you switch into ketosis, or a ketogenic state. The ketones your body produces and uses for fuel are powerful, inflammation-fighting superheroes. ß-hydroxybutyrate (also known as BHB) is a strong anti-inflammatory, inhibiting inflammatory pathways like NFkB, COX-2, and the NLRP3 inflammasome and activating the antioxidant, anti-inflammatory AMPK and Nrf2 pathways. Additionally, BHB activates the very important AMPK pathway, which is involved in regulating energy balance and helps reduce inflammation by inhibiting the inflammatory Nf-kB pathways in the body. BHB also exerts a similar effect on pain and inflammation as the NSAID drug ibuprofen, by inhibiting the COX-2 enzyme (without the side effects).

The Nrf2 pathway is a significant center for regulating inflammation, and while the ketones produced in nutritional ketosis up-regulate the Nrf2 pathway and the powerful anti-inflammatory cytokine IL-10, they also down-regulate pro-inflammatory cytokines. The Nrf2 pathway also regulates antioxidant-gene induction and works to turn on genes responsible for antioxidant and detox pathways in addition to cell function and inflammation. When the Nrf2 pathway is functioning at optimal levels, inflammation is calmed. When levels are low, inflammation is raised. Ketosis has also been shown to stimulate increased autophagy, or cellular clean-up and repair.

The simple version: The ketogenic diet triggers a complex biochemical process that directly fights inflammation, reducing and calming the chronic inflammation related to just about every health problem we see today.

 

People in general report having about 30% more energy in general on this diet, they can heal themselves of many chronic diseases because their body is finally functioning as it supposed to: by burning fat as its main fuel instead of carbs.

 

I've also read about people with social anxiety who were cured of their anxiety or it was significantly reduced by going keto. Read here more.

 

Here's also an interesting article from a psychologist on what the ketogenic diet does for the brain:

 

 

"GABA is the major inhibitory neurotransmitter in the mammalian nervous system. Turns out, GABA is made from glutamate, which just happens to be the major excitatory neurotransmitter. You need them both, but we seem to get into trouble when have too much glutamate. Too much excitement in the brain means neurotoxicity, the extreme manifestation of which is seizures. But neurological diseases as varied as depressionbipolar disorder, migraines, ALS, and dementia have all been linked in some way to neurotoxicity.

Glutamate has several fates, rather like our old buddy tryptophan. It can become GABA (inhibitory), or aspartate (excitatory and, in excess, neurotoxic). Ketogenic diets seem to favor glutamate becoming GABA rather than aspartate. No one knows exactly why, but part of the reason has to do with how ketones are metabolized, and how ketosis favors using acetate (acetoacetate is one of the ketone bodies, after all) for fuel. Acetate becomes glutamine, an essential precursor for GABA.

..

Ketosis for the body means fat-burning (hip hip hooray!). For the brain, it means a lower seizure risk and a better environment for neuronal recovery and repair."

 

Before attempting this diet (basically a high fat, low carb diet: 60-75% of calories from fat (or even more), 15-30% of calories from protein, and. 5-10% of calories from carbs. ) , I recommend reading up on it as much as possible because in the beginning you may feel worse for a couple of weeks (in the sense of fatigue, headaches) and then it's important to push through before your body is 'fat-adapted' as they say and you can start reaping the many benefits of being in the state of ketosis and being fat-adapted.






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