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Cognitive load and autonomic response patterns under negative priming demand in Depersonalisation-Derealisation Disorder (2016)


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#1 bubniakz

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Posted 27 January 2016 - 11:49 AM

Eur J Neurosci. 2016 Jan 21. doi: 10.1111/ejn.13183. 

Cognitive load and autonomic response patterns under negative priming demand in Depersonalisation-Derealisation Disorder.

Lemche ESierra-Siegert MDavid ASPhillips MLGasston DWilliams SCGiampietro VP.

 

Abstract

Previous studies have yielded evidence for cognitive processing abnormalities and alterations of autonomic functioning in Depersonalization-Derealization Disorder (DPRD). However multimodal neuroimaging and psychophysiology studies have not yet been conducted to test for functional and effective connectivity under cognitive stress in DPRD patients. DPRD and non-referred control (NC) subjects underwent a combined Stroop/Negative Priming task, and the neural correlates of Stroop Interference Effect, Negative Priming Effect, error rates, cognitive load span, and average amplitude of skin conductance responses were ascertained for both groups. Evoked hemodynamic responses for basic Stroop/Negative Priming activations were compared. For basic Stroop to neutral contrast, DPRD patients differed in the location (inferior vs superior lobule) of the parietal region involved, but showed similar activations in the left frontal region. In addition, DPRD patients also co-activated the dorsomedial prefrontal cortex (DMPFC BA9) and PCC (BA31), which were also found to be the main between-group difference regions. These regions furthermore showed connectivity with frequency of depersonalization states. Evoked hemodynamic responses drawn from ROIs indicated significant between-group differences in 30-40% of time points. Brain-behaviour correlations differed mainly in laterality yet only slightly in regions. A reversal of autonomic patterning became evident in DPRD patients for cognitive load spans, indicating less effective arousal suppression under cognitive stress: DPRD patients showed positive associations of cognitive load with autonomic responses, whereas controls exhibit respective inverse association. Overall, the results of the present study show only minor executive cognitive peculiarities, but further support the notion of abnormalities in autonomic functioning in DPRD patients. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

 

KEYWORDS:

Depersonalization-Derealization Disorder; Stroop word-colour interference; cognitive load; correlation image analysis; effective connectivity; electrodermal activity; evoked hemodynamic responses; functional connectivity; functional magnetic resonance imaging; negative priming

 

http://onlinelibrary....13183/abstract

If you want full pdf article, email me: [email protected]



#2 thy

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Posted 27 January 2016 - 12:03 PM

can someone translate this into English?  Whats a Stroop/Negative Priming task?



#3 thy

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Posted 27 January 2016 - 01:52 PM

They're testing cognitive (dys)function in DP patients using an exercise that requires a number of general faculties (e.g. attention, focus, speed, memory).

 

I don't have the full text so I don't know the specifics but a "Stroop/negative priming task" would usually suggest some variation on the old colour word task:

 

Unsurprisingly, it seems like they found some differences between DPtards and the controls. No doubt the DP sufferers performed appreciably worse. I'd be vaguely interested to know the specifics but I highly doubt that this trial is going to be of any practical value to any of us. It's entirely an academic study.

Yeah it does seem to be fairly academic without much practical value. Unless their is some other purpose behind the study, and the authors have some treatment in mind, though i doubt this. I guess "minor executive cognitive peculiarities" is the key finding, which we all knew already. 



#4 thy

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Posted 27 January 2016 - 01:54 PM

why dont they start researching some treatments that might actually work. 



#5 Zed

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Posted 27 January 2016 - 02:18 PM

why dont they start researching some treatments that might actually work. 

 

There are plenty of people out there who are effectively treating dissociative disorders..

 

Start with this organisation. Take a look and then tell me there are no treatments that actually work..

 

http://www.isst-d.or...sp?contentID=1 



#6 thy

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Posted 27 January 2016 - 02:53 PM

There are plenty of people out there who are effectively treating dissociative disorders..

 

Start with this organisation. Take a look and then tell me there are no treatments that actually work..

 

http://www.isst-d.or...sp?contentID=1 

that link doesnt seem to work. 



#7 Zed

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Posted 28 January 2016 - 01:55 AM

that link doesnt seem to work. 

 

Hmm?? Try this one..

 

http://www.isst-d.or...asp?contentID=9



#8 aworthycause

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Posted 01 February 2016 - 10:27 AM

This is the interesting bit:

 

A reversal of autonomic patterning became evident in DPRD patients for cognitive load spans, indicating less effective arousal suppression under cognitive stress: DPRD patients showed positive associations of cognitive load with autonomic responses, whereas controls exhibit respective inverse association.

 

So DP/DR patients suffer from more involuntary arousal from stressors (negative priming, i.e. being exposed to scary concepts/images) when cognitively stressed (busy thinking about a task). When healthy people are cognitively stressed, they show lower involuntary arousal than usual.

 

 

... unless my addled brain has misunderstood something. -_-



#9 luctor et emergo

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Posted 07 February 2016 - 12:45 PM

Underwent cognitive tests in 2008 and 2015. Definately some deviations in some areas but within the 2SD range.

Agree with Elliott. I already knew my cognitive capabilities were different. Not always worse though! And these tests confirmed this. Nothing more, nothing less.

#10 curiousmind

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Posted 05 February 2020 - 03:49 PM

why dont they start researching some treatments that might actually work. 

Repetitive Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation (rTMS) is showing promise. 

 

rTMS to the temporo-parietal junction (TPJ)

https://www.research...zation_Disorder

 

rTMS to right ventrolateral prefrontal cortex rVLPC

https://www.ncbi.nlm...les/PMC4906152/ (there have been numerous trials on this)

 

rTMS combined therapy with CBT

https://www.scienced...013700619301551

 

A study is currently being conducted testing rTMS therapy to the angular gyrus under the supervision of Marion Plaze in France, it is expected to be published early next year (2021). This study is double-blind in nature, placebo controlled and has a sample size of 102 patients making it the largest, most legitimate study for DPD thus far.  

 

The theory is that depersonalization-derealization disorder is at core a dysfunction of emotion regulation. Symptoms other than emotional numbing such as multisensory disintegration, feelings of unreality, memory problems, spacial cognition and attentional problems (other cognitive problems) et cetera are likely manifesting because the brain structures that are affected during the emotion regulation process are also involved in other processes mentioned previously, these structures are namely the rVLPC (which works together with other regions in the frontal lobe such as the dmPFC and DLPC), TPJ, angular gyrus. These regions are involved in emotion regulation and processing of incoming sensory stimuli (including emotions), but also spacial cognition, attention, memory (especially working memory but also long-term integration of experiences) et cetera. The autonomic blunting is thought to also be stemming from this regulatory process. This model is called the fronto-limbic theory proposed by Anthony David and Mauricio Sierra, and is currently the more accepted and "fashionable" explanation for this disorder. 






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