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Can anyone tell me about OCD?


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#1 Rogue Bullies

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Posted 25 June 2010 - 11:09 AM

I don't really understand this and why exactly its a medical condition. How would one know if they have it and what really are the symptoms? I mean doesn't everyone like things a certain way or to do things in a certain order? I tried looking it up and couldn't find anything good on it that really explained it to me. I wonder if I possibly have this and just don't know it or understand it enough?

Example someone online said they OCD about having a clean house. What is so bad about that I? So what you want your house clean I don't get how that's a medical condition so I apparently am not understanding.

#2 BlueTank

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Posted 25 June 2010 - 11:34 AM

I have an OCD friend. HE's gotten better, but back in the day I saw a lot of it and its hard to explain.

First and foremost I'd say its OCD and a problem when YOU say its a problem. So before DP/DR I exhibited some OCD things that really werent a problem. One thing I would do is check my email multiple times in a row. I wouldn't even concider it OCD. I didn't think much of it. I would find myself with tons of empty tabs in my browser for no reason. Sort of like a tick.

When you observe yourself doing this and its a problem, then your OCD. I think Disorder is pretty odd and subjective. I dunno. But my friend anyways, it was just about things that didn't have to happen. So its sort of a control thing. So things you can't really control are not too much of a problem, but like theres no good reason why your friend would may be miss the garbage can, but then not pick it up. Or leave the toilet lid up.

I think all of us try to control some level of chaos, but with OCD it can get to a point where it hinders living to a pretty big degree.

I hope this helps. I'm not even really sure myself.

Some people will repeat something to a certain number for no real reason which is heavy OCD.

#3 septimus

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Posted 25 June 2010 - 11:58 AM

People with OCD need to follow an obsessive routine of compulsive behaviors to relieve anxiety. Some can't relax unless they wash every floor in their house twice a day. Many have germ phobias, they need to wash their hands repeatedly. It can get to be very distressing.

#4 lindsayloo

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Posted 25 June 2010 - 12:04 PM

I was not diagnosed with it , but was told that I have ocd "traits". since I was little I have counted things like stairs, steps I take, etc, I do it all day without even noticing, I also trace words that I read with my finger, I will just be sitting and see a word on tv, and will trace the letters in my mind over and over again until It feels right, It doesn't bother me, I have always done it. I tend to obsess over things too.

#5 pancake

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Posted 25 June 2010 - 12:10 PM

Obligatory wiki link: http://en.wikipedia....ulsive_disorder

This is something I came across regarding treatment of violent obsessive thoughts. You wouldn't believe the shit this guy is getting his patients to do!
http://westsuffolkps...Obsessions.html

#6 Rogue Bullies

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Posted 25 June 2010 - 12:43 PM

I would say that maybe I am just a perfectionist. Little things to tend to bother me like if I just cleaned and there is a spot on the floor it will bug me until I wipe it up. I also do the thing where I check my email over and over on the phone when I am bored or read back through my text messages. For me everything has to be just right or it will bug me. I have to spell things right when I am writing and use proper punctuation or it will bug me. Even if I see someone else doing something wrong or not *my way* it will bug me.

Does this mean I have it LOL? I don't see how its a big issue really I just like things done a certain way. I wouldn't say it gives me anxiety it just bugs me sometimes. Sometimes I think about things over and over like yesterday I got into a small disagreement with a friend and I thought about it all last night and today and its been bugging me.

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Posted 25 June 2010 - 12:56 PM

http://www.mayoclinic.com/health/obsessive-compulsive-disorder/ds00189

Obsessive Compulsive Disorder is very serious. It is an illness. There are huge misconceptions that "well aren't all of us a little OCD." NO. This would be like saying to some with schizoprhenia, "Well aren't you just a tad confused today?"

OCD is an anxiety disorder. Individuals with OCD seem to have a "standard" pattern ... very simplistic here ....
1. Irrational thoughts about a need to arrange pencils in a drawer in a certain way or "something bad will happen."
2. Arranges pencils to alleviate anxiety, but anxiety isn't relieved.
3. Rearranges pencils 25 times.

A fear, a compulsion to do something about it, perform a ritual to relieve the anxiety.

I will find in the NYTimes the "Voices of OCD" section where individuals speak of their illnesses.

OCD is NOT just about "fears of contamination" -- which may be the endless handwashing.
OCD can have many "themes."
Some people may drive on the street, hit a bump and think they've killed someone. They become terrified, EVERYTIME they drive, EVERYWHERE they go that they have "run someone over with their car" and go back REPEATEDLY, 20 times, to see if someone is dead in the road.

I have a friend w/OCD. Before she was treated she had what used to be called "Scrupulosity" -- one of the earliest descritpions of OCD having to do with intrusive religious thoughts. She would have extremely illogical thoughts come into her head that she had done something blasphemous. She would get terrfied, she would then feel compelled to pray, to atone for her sins. She KNEW it was illogical, but if she didn't pray, and cross herself 100 TIMES, her anxiety would get worse and worse. She also had panic and DP/DR with the panic.

Some feel their food is contaminated. First they are careful when handling food, then they might avoid certain foods, then they might start thinking all food is "poisoned" ... in some cases OCD can morph (NOT IN THE MAJORITY) into a psychosis that say, "someone is literally POISONING the food."

Hoarder clutters (my father was one, though he was a surgeon) have very complex reasons for fears of throwing things out. He literally lived in such filth and squalor it was incomprehensible.

I can only repeat ... OCD is very serious. For some it is less limiting, for others it can keep one home bound. There is also some association with the development of OCD in children after a bout with a certain type of strep throat. PANDAS.

Let me see if I can find "the voices of OCD."

Anything that seriously disrupts social or occupational functioning is a DISORDER. This is not something minor. It is an illness. Everything is on a spectrum.
A sneeze on one end .... pneumonia on the other. (Poor example, but at any rate.)


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Posted 25 June 2010 - 01:10 PM

This is a MUST WATCH if you want to hear of the pain of having OCD. This is not something small. If something is literally destroying your life, it is an illness.
These are brief 2 minute videos on individuals with OCD, different kinds. Please take the time to watch this. Very brief. Voices of the individuals, photos, etc.

From The New York Times -- 2009
The health section there by Tara Parker Pope is excellent re: finding these ... "the voices of M.S., or of bipolar, or of cancer, etc." REAL PEOPLE, REAL STORIES.

http://well.blogs.ny...-voices-of-ocd/

"A person with obsessive-compulsive disorder, or O.C.D., is plagued by recurrent, unwanted thoughts and repetitive behaviors like hand-washing or counting. The first symptoms usually occur in childhood, and O.C.D. is said to afflict more than two million adults in the United States, according to the National Institute of Mental Health.

This week, the Patient Voices series by New York Times producer Karen Barrow focuses on six men and women with O.C.D.

Jared Kant, 26, of Boston, said the anxiety of O.C.D. often doesn’t make sense to those who witness it.

“That’s the torture of the disorder,” Mr. Kant says. “You’re totally cognizant that the things that you’re afraid of are not rational. But the fact that they’re not rational, that you know they’re not rational, doesn’t make them any less terrifying.”

Listen to more Voices of O.C.D., including a man who didn’t realize he had the condition until he was 50 and a high school student who battles his own “O.C.D. bully.” "

Also for more information on all Mental Illnesses go to http://www.nami.org National Alliance on Mental Illness, NAMI


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And when I was a child I had some "minor OCD" which came and went, and I still have it to a minor degree, though I do NOT have a diagnosis of OCD.
In school as a young girl, say 3-6th grade" ... I had a degree of a need for perfection. But it was very self destructive. I would have to write a paper for school, say 5 pages long. No big deal. I am intelligent. I can write. So I'd start on a fresh clean piece of writing paper with a set of neatly sharpened pencils. I would start writing the paper from very neatly organized note cards. If I got all the way to the bottom of a DRAFT of the paper and misspelled a word, I COULD NOT ERASE THE WORD OR CROSS IT OUT, I HAD TO START ALL OVER FROM THE BEGINNING AND COPY THE DRAFT UP TO THAT POINT. Sometimes I would start over and over and over, and not even get the paper written. My grades throughout school were all over the place because of this. I have GAD, clinical depression, chronic DP/DR. I had some brief OC perfectionistic traits like this .... these days, I get them sometimes, and have to tell myself to STOP, it is useless to do these things. I'm now 51 and this is the least of my concerns.

My anxiety, DP/DR remain serious, but with meds, time, therapy ... things are better in many ways. This also happened with studying, taking tests for years. Having to be certain I got EVERYTHING correct or the entire test was not worth taking. So I'd get an F when I could have gotten a B. More OC Personality than OCDISORDER.

This has to do with QUALITY OF LIFE.


#9 Kayla

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Posted 25 June 2010 - 01:22 PM

OCD is almost a way for someone to try and conquer their lives and their bodies. By following guidelines that they've set themselves, we think we can get a grasp on everything else. It can be debilitating, but I think almost everyone has it in one form or another, because we're all trying to strive towards our ideal life.

#10 ZachT

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Posted 25 June 2010 - 01:42 PM

I used to have really bad OCD. I used to wash my hands all the time because i was afraid of germs. I still count letters until they add up to a certain number.

Some people have cases that require a lot of meds to treat it.
My OCD i believe is caused by anxiety.

-Zach

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Posted 25 June 2010 - 01:43 PM

OCD is almost a way for someone to try and conquer their lives and their bodies. By following guidelines that they've set themselves, we think we can get a grasp on everything else. It can be debilitating, but I think almost everyone has it in one form or another, because we're all trying to strive towards our ideal life.


Kayla, I beg you to read about OCD and to listen to what individuals have to go through. It is a MEDICAL/NEUROLOGICAL disorder. Brain scans and other tests have proven this, as we know schizophrenia, bipolar, clinical depressioin ... all are MEDICAL.

You MUST read about it, listen to the individuals who suffer from it. Have you even listened to the personal descriptions? For my friend, she suffered greatly until she was treated. She is not "cured", but is 1,000 times more functional and HAPPY than she was 20 years ago when she refused to see a psychiatrist.


It can destroy peoples' lives.

This is not striving towards an "ideal life" -- this stands in the way of a productive life. Individuals have committed suicide over having OCD

There is a degree of a need to control our lives, yes. But there is PATHOLOGY. If you think about it, all mental illness is to a degree an exaggeration of normal behaviors..


#12 Kayla

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Posted 29 June 2010 - 08:48 PM

Kayla, I beg you to read about OCD and to listen to what individuals have to go through. It is a MEDICAL/NEUROLOGICAL disorder. Brain scans and other tests have proven this, as we know schizophrenia, bipolar, clinical depressioin ... all are MEDICAL.

You MUST read about it, listen to the individuals who suffer from it. Have you even listened to the personal descriptions? For my friend, she suffered greatly until she was treated. She is not "cured", but is 1,000 times more functional and HAPPY than she was 20 years ago when she refused to see a psychiatrist.


It can destroy peoples' lives.

This is not striving towards an "ideal life" -- this stands in the way of a productive life. Individuals have committed suicide over having OCD

There is a degree of a need to control our lives, yes. But there is PATHOLOGY. If you think about it, all mental illness is to a degree an exaggeration of normal behaviors..



I guess I was talking about my own experience with OCD.




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