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Do you daydream a lot?


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#1 lost235

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Posted 13 February 2021 - 09:35 AM

For as long as I can remember I’ve been daydreaming a lot, like a lot lot. It’s been both maladaptive daydreaming and just normal daydreaming. I think it’s always been a coping mechanism for me. Whether I’ve felt lonely, overwhelmed or depressed I’ve always daydreamed. It’s gotten to the point that I do it everyday ever since I was like 13( I’m 17 now), because I truly can’t feel satisfied without it. I put my headphones in and literally disappear into my own little world. And I’ve been thinking, could this be related to my dissociation? Does my brain just genetically and naturally have it easier to disappear instead of dealing with the issues I’m facing? Has anyone else always had a habit of daydreaming a lot? I think it could actually explain a lot of the issues I’m facing. Please anyone let me know if you can relate at all

#2 forestx5

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Posted 13 February 2021 - 10:47 AM

My daughter was probably aged 7 or 8 years old when she asked me "Daddy, where do you go when you do that?".

I was staring off into space.  "Oh, I said.  I'm just daydreaming."  "Many people often think of seizures as being very noticeable with full body tremors,

but there are many "small" seizures that can be harder to detect. For example, what appears to be an increased

amount of daydreaming or staring off into space might actually be signs your child is experiencing small seizures."

In my case, it was an example of a child recognizing the signs that her adult was experiencing small seizures called

absence seizures. Eventually, I would have an EEG which suggested I had a history of epileptic seizures, though I never lost

consciousness even once. There is a high coincidence of dissociative symptoms and depressive symptoms comrobid

with epileptic activity.



#3 Findmywayhome

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Posted 13 February 2021 - 10:35 PM

First of all, contrary to what the post above said, its probably not because you’re epileptic. Of course there is a correlation with epilepsy and dissociation, but not to an extent where it can be a reasonable first assumption of what the underlying cause is.

It’s fascinating how much I relate to this. And I think you make a great point. The process of daydreaming does seem very similar to the process of dissociation; you are coping in the same way by escaping reality. I literally do the same thing! I put on my headphones and blindly navigate my world imagining my ideal life for hours at a time. I literally cannot listen to music without simultaneously fantasizing about a better life.

Like you it seems, I wonder what can be done with this information. If i learn how to stop daydreaming, and face the reality of my life, will this alleviate my dissociation? Certainly doesn’t sound that far reaching, and I think it can certainly improve your emotional state. But how exactly can you stop daydreaming? Its not easy.

#4 lost235

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Posted 14 February 2021 - 05:58 AM

First of all, contrary to what the post above said, its probably not because you’re epileptic. Of course there is a correlation with epilepsy and dissociation, but not to an extent where it can be a reasonable first assumption of what the underlying cause is.

It’s fascinating how much I relate to this. And I think you make a great point. The process of daydreaming does seem very similar to the process of dissociation; you are coping in the same way by escaping reality. I literally do the same thing! I put on my headphones and blindly navigate my world imagining my ideal life for hours at a time. I literally cannot listen to music without simultaneously fantasizing about a better life.

Like you it seems, I wonder what can be done with this information. If i learn how to stop daydreaming, and face the reality of my life, will this alleviate my dissociation? Certainly doesn’t sound that far reaching, and I think it can certainly improve your emotional state. But how exactly can you stop daydreaming? Its not easy.


Yeah I know I don’t think it could be epilepsy either. I’m very much in control of when I want to daydream and not, it’s not like I accidentally fade away all of a sudden.

And literally, I relate so much to what you’re saying too. My daydreaming has literally gone to a point where I can’t listen to music without wanting to daydream or imagine stuff. I noticed yesterday when I was in the car (after just having another mental breakdown lol), the very first thing that just came natural to me was to daydream, and suddenly I didn’t feel so bad anymore. It does make me a little more derealised afterwards but at the same time I feel more happy so the possibility of me being able to spend time with others and be productive is higher. So I kinda don’t think that stopping the daydreaming necessarily equals to feeling better.

I’ve tried to stop daydreaming before my dpdr, as I noticed it was becoming obsessive (like maladaptive daydreaming), but I just really didn’t see a point in it. It didn’t make me feel better and I still wanted to do it everyday. I allowed myself to imagine things when I was in my car listening to music, other than that I forced myself to not do it. But I literally see no point in stopping it entirely, it’s fairly normal as long as it’s not an obsession. I’m trying more to teach myself to listen to music without wanting to daydream, and thinking one extra time before I do it. I will say tho the DP has helped me to not do it, because a lot of the time I feel too uncomfortable to do it, and can’t help myself from cringing every time (just because I kind of see the situation and myself from the side while I do it).

I’ve been Googling a bit and actually seen some articles about maladaptive daydreamers being more likely to dissociate. Haven’t read them yet because the language is just to complicated for my brain atm but I can let you know if I find any good ones!:)

#5 forestx5

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Posted 14 February 2021 - 09:14 AM

Just for clarification, my post does not say you are probably epileptic or that epilepsy is a reasonable first assumption for an explanation of

your symptoms. 



#6 lost235

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Posted 14 February 2021 - 10:41 AM

Just for clarification, my post does not say you are probably epileptic or that epilepsy is a reasonable first assumption for an explanation of
your symptoms.


Oh no I got that! I guess I’m just looking for a more psychological explanation and how daydreaming and dissociation can be connected.

#7 forestx5

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Posted 14 February 2021 - 02:51 PM

I let my mind wander, and it usually finds its way back home.  But, as with everything there can always be too much of a good thing.

Google "Maladaptive daydreaming" for insight into the potential pathology of daydreaming. (Just FYI.) I'm not suggesting you are

maladapted. lol






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