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#13 Brady12

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Posted 21 December 2016 - 12:25 AM

Does the combo of SSRI + antipsychotic work best at low doses or does it really not matter?

#14 Mydp

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Posted 23 December 2016 - 02:05 PM

Does the combo of SSRI + antipsychotic work best at low doses or does it really not matter?


I don't think the low dosage of the SSRI matters, other than it's best to start at the lowest dose necessary, but the low dose of antipsychotic seems to be across the board for most of us who have had success with this combo. Antipsychotics do different things at different doses. Usually lower doses are prescribed for severe anxiety, middle range doses for severe depression, and higher doses for psychosis.

#15 ManOnTheSilverMountain

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Posted 11 January 2017 - 03:26 PM

Alex222 posted a really interesting question.  Once you open the DP/DR door can it be closed again?  I have been completely recovered a few years and I did it through the traditional route of diet, exercise, CBT, the occasional Xanax and the passage of time.  Basically, I believe that my brain returned back to normal and I no longer have the ability to re-experience the sensations of DP/DR in a visceral way.  I remember what it was like intellectually, but I find that I can't re-experience the sensations or the odd, existential thought content regardless of how much I think about it.  Essentially, I believe that when my brain healed, that door was closed.  I no longer have any generalized anxiety and I've been completely symptom free for almost two years.  That said, I'm confident that I could re-open that door and it would probably re-open more easily now that I've been there before.  I think I'd need to have another major substance induced panic to get back there again and since I don't use any of the substances known to cause panic, I think I'm pretty safe.  To be clear, anxiety and DP/DR were never issues for me prior to my marijuana misadventure.  My symptoms were pretty severe for about 3 months and didn't go away entirely for about a year.  However, once they went away, they were gone completely.  For a long time, I felt 99% recovered, but I found that I had to quit agonizing over that last 1%.  After about a year, I decided to declare myself 100% recovered.  By doing that, I quit thinking about my DP/DR experience any time I felt a little off kilter.  I occasionally don't get enough sleep, get drunk and hung-over, drink too much coffee or just feel out of sorts.  Before, I'd always wonder if I was feeling weird due to lingering DP/DR symptoms.  I no longer ever worry about such things.  In essence, it took a while for my confidence to return even after my symptoms were gone.  I'm now confident that I've recovered 100%.  I am conscious of the fact that I could relapse and I believe it's a risk for anyone who's recovered from marijuana induced DP/DR.  However, I don't worry about it because it's entirely within my control whether I relapse or not.   



#16 mind.divided

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Posted 11 January 2017 - 03:30 PM

Alex222 posted a really interesting question.  Once you open the DP/DR door can it be closed again?  I have been completely recovered a few years and I did it through the traditional route of diet, exercise, CBT, the occasional Xanax and the passage of time.  Basically, I believe that my brain returned back to normal and I no longer have the ability to re-experience the sensations of DP/DR in a visceral way.  I remember what it was like intellectually, but I find that I can't re-experience the sensations or the odd, existential thought content regardless of how much I think about it.  Essentially, I believe that when my brain healed, that door was closed.  I no longer have any generalized anxiety and I've been completely symptom free for almost two years.  That said, I'm confident that I could re-open that door and it would probably re-open more easily now that I've been there before.  I think I'd need to have another major substance induced panic to get back there again and since I don't use any of the substances known to cause panic, I think I'm pretty safe.  To be clear, anxiety and DP/DR were never issues for me prior to my marijuana misadventure.  My symptoms were pretty severe for about 3 months and didn't go away entirely for about a year.  However, once they went away, they were gone completely.  For a long time, I felt 99% recovered, but I found that I had to quit agonizing over that last 1%.  After about a year, I decided to declare myself 100% recovered.  By doing that, I quit thinking about my DP/DR experience any time I felt a little off kilter.  I occasionally don't get enough sleep, get drunk and hung-over, drink too much coffee or just feel out of sorts.  Before, I'd always wonder if I was feeling weird due to lingering DP/DR symptoms.  I no longer ever worry about such things.  In essence, it took a while for my confidence to return even after my symptoms were gone.  I'm now confident that I've recovered 100%.  I am conscious of the fact that I could relapse and I believe it's a risk for anyone who's recovered from marijuana induced DP/DR.  However, I don't worry about it because it's entirely within my control whether I relapse or not.   

 

I would be very grateful if you could explain what you did to fully recover from this :) I'm 80% recovered but all advice is awesome



#17 popdeollie

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Posted 11 January 2017 - 06:14 PM

Alex222, I suffered severe, panic induced DP/DR for two and a half years and have made a full recovery without meds. You will never forget this experience, but I'm here to tell you that full recovery is possible. I haven't been on this site in some time, so I think I will make my own recovery post to share what I've learned.



#18 ManOnTheSilverMountain

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Posted 12 January 2017 - 12:17 AM

Hi mind.divided,

 

I didn't do anything special or have any epiphanies to recover.  I did the usual diet/exercise/CBT stuff, made some significant life changes and a lot of time passed.  To be clear, I recovered from the acute phase of this within a few months.  It's the post acute phase that causes problems for most people.  I had anhedonia on and off for almost a year and an odd feeling of being "out of phase" with reality.  I also developed DP/DR symptoms periodically during that time.  The keys to getting over the acute phase of recovery are fairly straightforward.....learn how to deal with acute anxiety.  However, once the anxiety is lessened, it's the loss of a sense of self, the loss of confidence and the need to regain enthusiasm for life that are challenges.  I found that I had to deliberately re-engage in life.  There's an old adage that we need to act our way into better thinking.  Basically, I needed to get out there and do stuff, despite the fact that I didn't feel like it.  By taking the right actions, my emotions eventually followed and I now feel my old enthusiasm for life again and I feel connected with this reality.  Recovery takes time and nobody's recovery is the same.  Some people have difficult life circumstances and pre-existing issues, but most people do recover from this 100%. 

 

Cheers!

 

MSM



#19 Jjj123

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Posted 12 January 2017 - 01:12 AM

Was yours 24/7? Like all day?

#20 partiedtoohard

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Posted 12 January 2017 - 12:41 PM

Hi mind.divided,

 

I didn't do anything special or have any epiphanies to recover.  I did the usual diet/exercise/CBT stuff, made some significant life changes and a lot of time passed.  To be clear, I recovered from the acute phase of this within a few months.  It's the post acute phase that causes problems for most people.  I had anhedonia on and off for almost a year and an odd feeling of being "out of phase" with reality.  I also developed DP/DR symptoms periodically during that time.  The keys to getting over the acute phase of recovery are fairly straightforward.....learn how to deal with acute anxiety.  However, once the anxiety is lessened, it's the loss of a sense of self, the loss of confidence and the need to regain enthusiasm for life that are challenges.  I found that I had to deliberately re-engage in life.  There's an old adage that we need to act our way into better thinking.  Basically, I needed to get out there and do stuff, despite the fact that I didn't feel like it.  By taking the right actions, my emotions eventually followed and I now feel my old enthusiasm for life again and I feel connected with this reality.  Recovery takes time and nobody's recovery is the same.  Some people have difficult life circumstances and pre-existing issues, but most people do recover from this 100%. 

 

Cheers!

 

MSM

This guy has been so helpful to me over the past year. And MSM seeing your post made me smile, glad to see you are still around and I am happy to see you are still doing well. 

I consider my trip down this road to be pretty similar to MSM's, my horrible symptoms were gone for about 3 months, but i still had/have that "off" or "weird" feeling, which I think is what MSM's 99 and not quite 100% feeling. Sometimes I have slipped and started getting into this bad place about never recovering, and some days are not good. But I am 100% determined to get 100%. Maybe my time will be longer since I did not do CBT or Xanax, and I have been pretty slacking on diet and exercise. January 10th marked 1 year since my ordeal, and I had a bad time of accepting I was not better like MSM after his 1 year, but I made a promise to myself for this year to get both physically ,and mentally better. 



#21 mind.divided

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Posted 12 January 2017 - 06:16 PM

Hi mind.divided,

 

I didn't do anything special or have any epiphanies to recover.  I did the usual diet/exercise/CBT stuff, made some significant life changes and a lot of time passed.  To be clear, I recovered from the acute phase of this within a few months.  It's the post acute phase that causes problems for most people.  I had anhedonia on and off for almost a year and an odd feeling of being "out of phase" with reality.  I also developed DP/DR symptoms periodically during that time.  The keys to getting over the acute phase of recovery are fairly straightforward.....learn how to deal with acute anxiety.  However, once the anxiety is lessened, it's the loss of a sense of self, the loss of confidence and the need to regain enthusiasm for life that are challenges.  I found that I had to deliberately re-engage in life.  There's an old adage that we need to act our way into better thinking.  Basically, I needed to get out there and do stuff, despite the fact that I didn't feel like it.  By taking the right actions, my emotions eventually followed and I now feel my old enthusiasm for life again and I feel connected with this reality.  Recovery takes time and nobody's recovery is the same.  Some people have difficult life circumstances and pre-existing issues, but most people do recover from this 100%. 

 

Cheers!

 

MSM

 

Thank you!



#22 dreamedm

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Posted 12 January 2017 - 09:07 PM

Just curious, MSM, did you have the blank mind, too? Or was your dp/dr more of a racing thoughts type?



#23 Alex222

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Posted 23 January 2017 - 09:20 AM

I want to thank everybody for their replay.
It meens a lot, and it gives hope, and faith in new life and freedom.
I just need to be free so much, now i have hope that i will be.
I am happy that you understood my question, once you open the door can you close them again, can you unsee what you saw and live your life normal again.
By normal life, i understand life in wich you do not question how dp or dr do you feel in every aspect of the day, when you walk, talk, eat, in every moment.
Now i would appreciate some advice on HOW TO LET GO?
On the days i feel happy, i go out, i go have some coffee, but i just can not stop thinking about this even when i feel good, when my vision and my emotions are ok, i can't stop thinking about this.
How am i going to stop this to become a part of my life?
How to forget something i was obsessing for a year and a half now?
I think i have the "pink ellephant in the room" syndrome, as much i want to stop thinking about this i just think about it more.

#24 Alex222

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Posted 23 January 2017 - 09:36 AM

ManOnTheSilverMountain
I also have that same problem with post acute phase, i somethimes do not feel the most symptoms, but i find my self in this place that i do not know what to do, it's like my life stopped, i had dp with nothing else happening, and now i do not know how to continue and forget dp happend in my life.
That patern off thinking drags dp and dr all over again on me.
How do you treat anhedonia? I think that it's normal to have it after the acute phase, but how do we deal with it...




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